The Clocks That Time Us: A Time to Deliver,

Wed, Feb 27 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
McConnell B-05, 2 Tyler Drive

“The Clocks That Time Us: A Time to Deliver,” by Carmel Martin-Fairey, Center for Reproductive Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Saddest Words: William Faulkner and the Problem of Memory

Mon, Feb 25 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Conference Room, Alumnae House, 33 Elm St.

Smith College Professor Michael Gorra is the author of, among other books, The Bells in Their Silence: Travels through Germany and Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He teaches English at Smith College. His current book-in-progress is William Faulkner’s Civil War

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Rhythm Nations

Sat, Feb 23 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
John M. Greene Hall, 60 Elm St.

 Smith College international students showcase their many talents. Past performances have included dancing, singing, and martial arts.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Moors

Fri, Feb 22 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Hallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, Mendenhall CPA, 122 Green St. +

“The Moors” by Jen Silverman, directed by Isabelle Brown '19. Two sisters and a dog live out their lives on the bleak English moors, dreaming of love and power. The arrival of a hapless governess and a moor-hen set all three on a strange and dangerous path. “The Moors” is a dark comedy about love, desperation, and visibility.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
$10 General, $5 Students/Seniors.
Campus contact: 

A Love Letter: An Encounter with White Backlash

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Seelye 201, Two Seelye Drive

George Yancy, professor of philosophy, Emory University, will discuss what it means to do public intellectual work as a philosopher who believes in fearless speech when it comes to discussing race, especially whiteness. He will also discuss how fearless speech linked with love can lead to tremendous forms of white hatred and white backlash. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Grief in Focus: On the War Photography of Cynthia Elbaum

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Campus Center 103/104, 100 Elm St.

 Michael Kunichika, professor of Russian and media studies at Amherst College, will speak about the work of photojournalist Cynthia Elbaum, whose powerful images of the Chechen War are on view in Nolen Art Lounge in the Smith College Campus Center (See Campus Exhibitions). Elbaum was a 1989 Smith College graduate who was killed in 1994 while on assignment for Time magazine. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Karma in Translation: Buddhism, Darwinism and the Rediscovery of Children in Modern China

Mon, Feb 11 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Fayerweather Hall, 113

Lei Ying, postdoctoral fellow at Fudan University in Shanghai, will give a talk titled "Karma in Translation: Buddhism, Darwinism and the Rediscovery of Children in Modern China."

When Thomas Henry Huxley’s Evolution and Ethics was translated into Chinese at the end of the 19th century, thanks to the ingenious efforts of Yan Fu, it became an immediate hit among Chinese intellectuals who were preoccupied with China’s fate in a colonial world order.

This study traces how evolutionary thinking entered China through Buddhist translingual practice and brought with it unexpected implications, when Huxley’s invocation of the notion of karma stirred the power of darkness in Lu Xun. The leader of “New Literature” who championed the call to “save the children” was torn between a widespread developmentalist faith among his contemporaries and his own deep-rooted fear for karmic inheritance and a spectral past that constantly returns to haunt the present. This study highlights the global circulation of Buddhist ideas as a distinct facet of the modern age. Moreover, in revisiting some of Lu Xun’s best-known and lesser-known works, it celebrates literature as a vehicle for spiritual reflection and pays homage to writing as existential courage.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible

LEAKS, HACKS, AND SCANDALS: ARAB CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Wed, Feb 13 2019 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Herter Hall 301

The Five College Arabic Language Initiative invites you to a lecture by Tarek El-Ariss, Associate Professor and Chair of Middle Eastern Studies Dartmouth College. 

Refreshments will be served. Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by:

The Qatar Foundation International

UMass Amherst Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

MHC Asian Studies Department

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Tale of Genji in Word and Image

Mon, Feb 18 2019 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Graham Auditorium, Hillyer, 20 Elm St.

 “The Tale of Genji in Word and Image” by Melissa McCormick, Professor of Japanese Art and Culture at Harvard University. McCormick will discuss her recent book and upcoming Met exhibition: The exhibition will feature artwork from the 11th century to the present, including contemporary manga.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Undercurrents: Excerpts from an Atlas of the Sea

Mon, Feb 18 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Graham Auditorium, Hillyer, 20 Elm St.

“Undercurrents: Excerpts from an Atlas of the Sea” by Elisa Kim, assistant professor of art, Smith College.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

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