Kevin Killian Reading for Visiting Writers

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Old Chapel
Kevin Killian

The University of Massachusetts Amherst MFA for Poets and Writers presents a reading by Kevin Killian on Thursday, February 21st at 8pm in the Old Chapel.

Kevin Killian, one of the original “New Narrative” writers, has written three novels, Shy (1989), Arctic Summer (1997), and Spreadeagle (2012), a book of memoirs, and three books of stories.  He has also written four books of poetry, most recently Tony Greene Era, from Wonder Books.  With Peter Gizzi he has edited My Vocabulary Did This To Me: The Collected Poetry of Jack Spicer (2008)—for Wesleyan University Press. Wesleyan also brought out Killian and Lew Ellingham’s acclaimed biography of Spicer in 1998. For the San Francisco Poets Theater Killian has written forty-five plays, and the anthology he compiled with David Brazil—The Kenning Anthology of Poets Theater 1945-1985—has become the standard book on the subject.

Recent projects include Tagged, Killian’s nude photographs of poets, artists, writers, filmmakers and intellectuals; and, with Dodie Bellamy, Writers Who Love Too Much: New Narrative Writing 1977-1997 (Nightboat Books).

Two new projects appeared in November 2018: Fascination: Memoirs, from Semiotext(e)/MIT, including Triangles in the Sand, Killian’s memories of the musician Arthur Russell; and Stage Fright (from Kenning)—ten plays from the San Francisco Poets Theater. He teaches writing to MFA students at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

Killian is reading as part of the MFA program’s Visiting Writers Series.

Celebrating its fifty-fourth year, the nationally renowned Visiting Writers Series at UMass Amherst presents emerging and established writers of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. The Series is sponsored by the MFA for Poets and Writers and the Juniper Initiative, and  made possible by support from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the University of Massachusetts Arts Council, and the English Department. This event is co-sponsored as well by the Amherst College English Department and Center for Creative Writing; the Amherst College Queer Resource Center; the UMass Stonewall Center; the UMass Program in Comparative Literature; the UMass Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies; and The Massachusetts Review. This reading is free, accessible, and open to the public. Learn more at www.umass.edu/english-mfa.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Reassessing Film in the Foreign Language Curriculum: A Multiliteracies Approach

Wed, Feb 20 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Herter Hall 601

Professor Mark Kaiser of the University of California, Berkeley will present
a talk for faculty entitled: "Reassessing Film in the Foreign Language
Curriculum: A Multiliteracies Approach"

Abstract: Since the advent of television in the 1950s and VHS in the 1970s,
the foreign language community has seen great potential in video for foreign
language instruction. And yet, for reasons legal, technical and pedagogical,
video has never lived up to the original expectations. This failure has been
particularly true of film, feature and documentary, as instructors have
struggled with students’ comprehension issues, leading to SLA studies on
the effectiveness of subtitles, captions, pre-viewing and post-viewing
strategies. The ensuing pedagogical approaches rarely went beyond
communicative strategies of scene description and regurgitation of plot. For
the past few years several scholars (Paesani et al 2016; Kaiser 2018) have
advocated for a reexamination of film within a multiliteracies approach,
whereby the film is seen as a text employing various semiotic systems to
create meaning.

In this presentation I will discuss clips from several different films and
examine the ways that filmic devices and language are used to create meaning.
I will consider various tasks that an instructor might employ with the aim of
developing students’ linguistic, intercultural, and symbolic competences
and their visual literacy. Finally, I will demonstrate the core features of
"Lumière," the Berkeley Language Center's database of 19,000+ clips, and the
strategies used in Lumière to aid student comprehension.


Mark Kaiser received his PhD in Slavic Linguistics from the University of
Michigan in 1989. He taught Russian at Illinois State University, reaching
the rank of Associate Professor, and served as director of the Russian
Studies program there. He went to Berkeley in 1996 to serve as the Associate
Director of the newly formed Berkeley Language Center. At the BLC Kaiser has
worked on 150+ curricular projects by graduate students and language
lecturers as part of the BLC Fellows program; he has designed new classroom
spaces; he oversaw the development of an online computer testing platform,
currently in use by Chinese and Japanese for placement. However, most of his
time at the BLC has been spent in the development of the Library of Foreign
Language Film Clips, renamed Lumière, an online database of film and clips.
He occasionally teaches various levels of Russian.

Professor Kaiser's visit to the Pioneer Valley is sponsored by the Mount
Holyoke College Russian & Eurasian Studies Department, the Amherst Russian
Department, the Three College Russian Initiative and the Five College Center
for the Study of World Languages.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
The Whitmore Administration Parking Lot is close to Herter Hall and has open parking after 5pm.
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Five College Dance presents "Spring"

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 8:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Kirby Theater
Spring

Five College Dance, in collaboration with the Amherst College Department of Theater and Dance, presents "Spring," an evening of dance featuring contributions from faculty, guest artists, and dancers across all five campuses. Tickets are free, but reservations are requested: 413-542-2277 or fcddance.reservations@gmail.com.

The concert opens with "made in the maze", a new work by Dante Brown (Visiting Assistant Professor/Amherst College) that responds to current events, highlighting the paradoxical strength and fragility of marginalized bodies that reside in American culture as they search for the idea of community. Lailye Weidman (Visiting Assistant Professor/Hampshire College) presents "Showman." This solo emerged from found photographs of a hardcore punk band active in New England in the 90s. Attempting and failing to re-perform these still images opened the door to an investigation of the energies and textures of hardcore music, the genre’s modes of feeling, and qualities of movement that “sound” like reverb. In its current state, "Showman" is also a resonating chamber, where other iconic performance modes - from glam rock to competition dance - resound alongside hardcore embodiment. Barbie Diewald (Visiting Artist/Mount Holyoke College) offers "Pare: Constellation 2." Comprised of several layers - each an independent dance with its own rules and relationships - "Pare: Constellation 2" asks what it means to share space and time, and to come together at the level of the body. The work brings together local professional dancers and Five College Dance faculty, alumni, and current students, and features an original score composed and performed by Jazer Giles. UMass and Smith College dancers present "Picture This," a new work by critically acclaimed choreographer David Dorfman. What started as an invitation by UMass faculty member Paul Dennis to respond to José Limón’s "A Choreographic Offering," in which Limón pays homage to his mentor Doris Humphrey, ended up as a kinetic, visual, musical and textual homage to the next generation of dance citizens - a brief look at what makes these fine performers both joyous and angry in regard to love and politics. Video design by UMass faculty member Jenny Vogel adds to the architectural soul of the dance, while Kellie Lynch (SC MFA ‘07) and Kelsey Saulnier (UM ‘18) contributed as choreographic assistants and UMass faculty member Leslie Frye Maietta served as rehearsal director. The concert concludes with Camille A. Brown’s "New Second Line," Five College Dance’s 2018-19 guest artist repertory project, made possible with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. This exuberant, funky work was inspired by the events of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The dance is a celebration of the spirit and culture of the people of New Orleans. Second Line is a traditional brass band parade for weddings, social events, and most notably, funerals. The people who follow the parade dancing with high energy and spirit are known as the ‘second line.’ Camille A. Brown & Dancers company member Mayte Natalio and Five College Dance faculty member Shakia Johnson served as rehearsal directors. The concert will also feature a new video installation work by Rodger Blum (Professor/Smith College) in the lobby.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Ticket info: 
Tickets are free, but reservations are requested: 413-542-2277 or fcddance.reservations@gmail.com.
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The Clocks That Time Us: A Time to Deliver,

Wed, Feb 27 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
McConnell B-05, 2 Tyler Drive

“The Clocks That Time Us: A Time to Deliver,” by Carmel Martin-Fairey, Center for Reproductive Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine. 

Campus: 
Smith College
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The Saddest Words: William Faulkner and the Problem of Memory

Mon, Feb 25 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Conference Room, Alumnae House, 33 Elm St.

Smith College Professor Michael Gorra is the author of, among other books, The Bells in Their Silence: Travels through Germany and Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He teaches English at Smith College. His current book-in-progress is William Faulkner’s Civil War

Campus: 
Smith College
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Rhythm Nations

Sat, Feb 23 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
John M. Greene Hall, 60 Elm St.

 Smith College international students showcase their many talents. Past performances have included dancing, singing, and martial arts.

Campus: 
Smith College
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The Moors

Fri, Feb 22 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Hallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, Mendenhall CPA, 122 Green St. +

“The Moors” by Jen Silverman, directed by Isabelle Brown '19. Two sisters and a dog live out their lives on the bleak English moors, dreaming of love and power. The arrival of a hapless governess and a moor-hen set all three on a strange and dangerous path. “The Moors” is a dark comedy about love, desperation, and visibility.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
$10 General, $5 Students/Seniors.
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A Love Letter: An Encounter with White Backlash

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Seelye 201, Two Seelye Drive

George Yancy, professor of philosophy, Emory University, will discuss what it means to do public intellectual work as a philosopher who believes in fearless speech when it comes to discussing race, especially whiteness. He will also discuss how fearless speech linked with love can lead to tremendous forms of white hatred and white backlash. 

Campus: 
Smith College
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Grief in Focus: On the War Photography of Cynthia Elbaum

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Campus Center 103/104, 100 Elm St.

 Michael Kunichika, professor of Russian and media studies at Amherst College, will speak about the work of photojournalist Cynthia Elbaum, whose powerful images of the Chechen War are on view in Nolen Art Lounge in the Smith College Campus Center (See Campus Exhibitions). Elbaum was a 1989 Smith College graduate who was killed in 1994 while on assignment for Time magazine. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Karma in Translation: Buddhism, Darwinism and the Rediscovery of Children in Modern China

Mon, Feb 11 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Fayerweather Hall, 113

Lei Ying, postdoctoral fellow at Fudan University in Shanghai, will give a talk titled "Karma in Translation: Buddhism, Darwinism and the Rediscovery of Children in Modern China."

When Thomas Henry Huxley’s Evolution and Ethics was translated into Chinese at the end of the 19th century, thanks to the ingenious efforts of Yan Fu, it became an immediate hit among Chinese intellectuals who were preoccupied with China’s fate in a colonial world order.

This study traces how evolutionary thinking entered China through Buddhist translingual practice and brought with it unexpected implications, when Huxley’s invocation of the notion of karma stirred the power of darkness in Lu Xun. The leader of “New Literature” who championed the call to “save the children” was torn between a widespread developmentalist faith among his contemporaries and his own deep-rooted fear for karmic inheritance and a spectral past that constantly returns to haunt the present. This study highlights the global circulation of Buddhist ideas as a distinct facet of the modern age. Moreover, in revisiting some of Lu Xun’s best-known and lesser-known works, it celebrates literature as a vehicle for spiritual reflection and pays homage to writing as existential courage.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible

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