Not Backing Down

Sat, May 4 2019 - 6:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Fine Arts Center
Not Backing Down

Legendary rocker Roger Waters of Pink Floyd fame, who has emerged as one of the world’s most prominent advocates for Palestinian human rights, will appear at the UMass Fine Arts Center in Amherst on May 4 at 6:30 p.m. for a panel discussion on the accelerating backlash against pro-Palestinian voices.

The panel, “Not Backing Down: Israel, Free Speech, and the Battle for Palestinian Human Rights,” will address recent attacks on Rep. Ilhan Omar and other progressives who have spoken out against Israel’s 50-year military occupation of Palestinian land and pushed back against the claim that criticizing Israeli government policies is “anti-Semitic.”

Waters, who has himself been repeatedly vilified as an “anti-Semite” for his criticisms of Israel’s human rights abuses, will be joined on the panel by other activists and journalists who have come under fire and faced death threats for their outspoken criticisms of the occupation.

They include: Palestinian-American political activist Linda Sarsour, the co-founder of MPower Change and co-chair of the Women’s March, who was recently targeted by a private Israeli intelligence firm as part of a coordinated U.S. campaign to prevent her from speaking out against Israeli policies on American college campuses; Marc Lamont Hill, a professor and political commentator who has visited the West Bank with Black Lives Matter and was fired earlier this year by CNN for remarks he made in support of Palestinian rights; and Nation magazine sports editor and author Dave Zirin, a frequent contributor to MSNBC and ESPN who has been called a “self-hating Jew” for his criticisms of Israeli human rights abuses, his outspoken defense of Ilhan Omar, and his support for NFL players who refused to go on a promotional trip to Israel funded by the Israeli government.

“The vicious smears these four people have been subjected to are part of a systematic effort to change the subject and deflect attention away from the billions of dollars in financial and military aid the U.S. continues to give Israel despite its ongoing violations of international law and Palestinian human rights,” said Sut Jhally, a professor of Communication at UMass and the Executive Director of the Northampton-based Media Education Foundation (MEF), which is organizing the event. “The good news is that more and more people – Palestinians, African-Americans, young progressive Jews and Christians alike – are staring down these intimidation tactics, refusing to be silenced, and speaking up for Palestinian human rights regardless of the consequences. This panel is clear evidence of that.”

The panel will be moderated by Vijay Prashad, a journalist and historian who appears regularly on Democracy Now! and the Real News Network and is the author or editor of over 30 books, including Letters to Palestine: Writers Respond to War and Occupation.

This event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Tickets will be available at the FAC box office the night of the event, but advanced tickets are highly recommended. For tickets and more information, visit NotBackingDownUmass.com.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
Fine Arts Center 151 Presidents Drive, Amherst, MA. 01003 Free and secure parking is available on Massachusetts Avenue in University Lots 32, 34, and 71 after 5:00pm and all day on weekends. Accessible parking is available in the South Entrance Lot in front of the Fine Arts Center building when the appropriate license plate or placard is displayed.
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Wake Up: Reflections on Our Past Envisioning our Future

Fri, Apr 19 2019 - 8:30am
Location: 
All Campus
Wake Up: Reflections on Our Past Envisioning our Future

W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies

Graduate Student Symposium

*New Africa House Theater Room (8:30 am - 12:15 pm)

Alumni Panel:  
Judyie Al-Bilali, Shawn Alexander, Mtali Banda, Sid Ferreira, Jacinta Saffold

Chair Panel: 
Emeritus Professors Ernest Allen, Esther Terry, Michael Thelwell; and, Professors John Bracey, Amilcar Shabazz

*Amherst Room, Campus Center (12:30 pm - 7:00 pm)

Undergraduate Panel: 
Nathalie Amazan, Ethank Bakuli, Ivis Batista, Chayanne Chataigne, Franzchesca Dormeus, Samantha Sims, Alexis Umeh, Christian Woods

Graduate Panel: 
Biko, Kymberly Newberry, Quaram Robinson, Lana Sims, Erika Slocumb

Keynote Panel:
Professors Kymberly Juanita Brown, Fumi Okiji, Britt Rusert and Frank B. Wilderson, III

*Lunch and refreshments provided!

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

UMass Earth Day Festival 2019

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 12:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Goodell Hall Lawn
Earth Day 2019

Each year, UMass Amherst holds a festival where various sustainability-related organizations on campus and in the greater Pioneer Valley showcase the awesome projects they are working on to make our community more socially, economically, and environmentally just! Join us in our festivities!

This year, the Earth Day Network's global campaign is Protect our Species. Their goals are to:

1.) Educate and raise awareness about the accelerating rate of extinction of millions of species and the causes and consequences of this phenomenon.
 
2.) Achieve major policy victories that protect broad groups of species as well as individual species and their habitats.
 
3.) Build and activate a global movement that embraces nature and its values.
 
4.) Encourage individual actions such as adopting plant based diet and stopping pesticide and herbicide use.
Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
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Zube Lecture: 'How We See' with Eric and Silvina Blasen

Wed, Apr 17 2019 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Olver Design Building Room: 170
Zube Lecture: 'How We See' with Eric and Silvina Blasen

Eric and Silvina Blasen from Blasen Landscape Architecture will present: "How we see".

Eric Blasen, ASLA, studied art history at the University of London, England, received his Bachelor of Science in Geography from Oregon State University and his Masters of Landscape Architecture from University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He first explored practical design by making furniture and won his first design award for it. In 1993, he cofounded, with his wife, Silvina, Blasen andscape Architecture, a design studio, in San Anselmo, California. The design team has created landscapes for places of worship, schools, corporate offices, and wineries, but its main focus is large residential gardens, for which it has garnered top American landscape architecture awards. Eric Blasen has taught in the Architecture Department at California College of Art, San Francisco, California, and served on many academic juries.

Silvina Blasen is a principal of Blasen Landscape Architecture and it’s plant expert and green practices advocate. After gaining her Certificate in Horticulture from Sierra College, Rocklin, California she became a partner with Stienstra/Martierena Landscape Architecture-Design Build Garden Company in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and nursery manager at Smith & Hawken’s original store, in Mill Valley, California. Her passion for planting design and knowledge of the environment result in work that is acclaimed for its creativity and commitment to sustainability

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Contact email: 
larpinfo@umass.edu
Campus contact: 

Artist's Talk: Mary Frey

Tue, Apr 16 2019 - 5:00pm
Location: 
South College Rm. W360
Mary Frey

Mary Frey will present images from two of her recent publications, Reading Raymond Carver(2017) and Real Life Dramas (2018), and discuss her process and thoughts about re-shaping early work into a new form — the photo book.

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition What’s So Funny? How Humor Makes Us Think / Co-curated by Kayla Peterson (M.A. Art History, 2020) and Siyu Shen (M.A. Art History, 2020) / On view through April 28 at the University Museum.                           

Aabout the Artist: Mary Frey earned her MFA from the Yale University School of Art in 1979 and later taught photography at the Hartford Art School; she retired from the undergraduate program in 2015. Among the numerous awards Frey has received are a Guggenheim Fellowship (1984), and two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts (1980 and 1992). She was the Harnish Visiting Artist at Smith College (1994–95). Her pictures are included in many public and private collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Chicago Art Institute; and the International Polaroid Collection. www.maryfrey.com

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Divest, Resist, Transform

Tue, Apr 16 2019 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Integrated Science Building Rm. 145
Divest, Resist, Transform

Come learn how we can free up resources for green sustainable technologies and invest in environmental and social justice — all by abolishing nuclear weapons. And learn why the new UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons is the game-changer we've been waiting for.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Event contact: 
Tim Wallis
Contact phone: 
774-262-2833
Contact email: 
timmon@nuclearban.us
Campus contact: 

Senior Recital Performance: Amber Liu '19, Piano

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Arms Music Center, 3
Amber Liu

Amber Liu's senior piano recital is an exploration of music from different time periods, including Classical, Romantic, French and Spanish Impressionism and Contemporary. The program features pieces by Haydn, Chopin, Debussy, Prokofiev,and Albeniz.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Why Do Countries Refrain from Using Nuclear Weapons?

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Beneski Earth Sciences Building, Paino Lecture Hall
Jennifer Erickson

Jennifer Erickson will give a talk titled: "Why Do Countries Refrain from Using Nuclear Weapons". Jennifer L. Erickson is an associate professor in the Political Science Department and International Studies Program at Boston College. Her research interests include international security and arms control, conventional and nuclear weapons, and the laws and norms of war. Her current book project explores the historical and contemporary cases of new weapons technologies and the creation of new laws and norms of war. Her first book, which deals with the conventional arms trade and the creation of the UN Arms Trade Treaty, won the 2017 APSA Foreign Policy Section's Best Book Award.

The event is being sponsored by the Stanton Foundation and the Political Science Department of Amherst College.

This event is free and open to the public.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Stars on Screen

Wed, Apr 17 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum
The Stars On Screen

Join us for a screening of short science films from the 1920s and 1930s. Stay for a conversation with Vanja Malloy, curator of American Art; Hannah Goodwin, assistant professor of film and media studies at Mount Holyoke College; and Kate Follette, assistant professor of astronomy at Amherst College. This program is supported by Arts at Amherst, Amherst College Program of Film and Media Studies and the Amherst College Department of Astronomy.

This event is free and open to all!

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Whiteness of Walden: Reading Thoreau with Attention to Race

Tue, Apr 16 2019 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Chapin Hall, 101
Thoreau Venture

Rebecca Kneale Gould is associate professor of environmental studies at Middlebury College where she teaches courses in the environmental humanities. She received her Ph.D. in the study of religion from Harvard University in 1997 and her research and teaching focuses on the many compelling ways in which religious and spiritual identity shape and are shaped by our relationships to the natural world (both urban and rural). She is the author of numerous articles and books, and has worked as a board member for the “Religion and Ecology” group of the American Academy of Religion and currently serves on the boards of Vermont Interfaith Power and Light and The Thoreau Society.

The environmental movement in the United States has been criticized, quite justifiably, for its overwhelming “whiteness” — including the demographics of its leadership, its lack of attention to social and environmental justice and the racist views of many early conservationists. Where does the life and work of Henry David Thoreau fit into this troubled history? Should we still read, teach and study the work of this “dead white man” today? Gould's argument is that we do a disservice both to Thoreau and to ourselves if we fail to acknowledge the “whiteness” of his thinking and his legacy. At the same time, however, Thoreau’s work calls us to be accountable to our broken world in ways that may ring true now more than ever. In this talk, Gould will offer both scholarly and pedagogical reflections on reading Thoreau with attention to race, leaving ample time for questions and conversation.

This lecture is free and open to the public and is generously sponsored by the Willis D. Wood Fund.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

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