Five College Consortium

Edges, Textures, Stages: James Young and the Field of Memory Studies

Tue, Feb 5 2019 - 10:00am to 6:30pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst MA 01002

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies (UMass Amherst) invites you to attend a symposium on Tuesday, February 5th, "Edges, Textures,
Stages: James Young and the Field of Memory Studies".

Schedule:
10am-10:30am Opening remarks

10:30am-12pm Panel 1
Deborah Dwórk (Clark University)
Samuel Kassow (Trinity College)
Alice Greenwald (National September 11 Memorial and Museum)

12pm-1:30pm Lunch

1:30pm-3pm Panel 2
Horst Hoheisel (artist, Kassel)

3pm-3:30pm Break

3:30pm-5pm Panel 3
Laura Levitt (Temple University)
Lawrence Douglas (Amherst College)

5pm-5:30pm Closing remarks

5:30pm-6:30pm Reception

The symposium is co-sponsored with the generous support of the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies; the College of Humanities and Fine Arts; the Department of History; the University of Massachusetts Press; and the Program in German and Scandinavian Studies.

Organizers: Hannah Pollin-Galay (Department of Literature, Tel Aviv
University) and Jonathan Skolnik (Program in German and Scandinavian Studies, UMass Amherst)

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

Ecologies of Witnessing: Language, Place and Holocaust Testimony

Mon, Feb 4 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst MA 01002

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst is hosting a panel discussion and launch event for the new book, “Ecologies of
Witnessing: Language, Place and Holocaust Testimony” by Hannah Pollin-Galay.

In “Ecologies of Witnessing: Language, Place and Holocaust Testimony”
(Yale University Press, 2018), Pollin-Galay sets out to rethink conventional wisdom about Holocaust testimony, focusing on the power of language and place to shape personal narrative. Oral histories of Lithuanian Jews serve as the textual base for this exploration. Comparing the remembrances of Holocaust victims who remained in Lithuania with those who resettled in Israel and North America after World War II, Pollin-Galay reveals meaningful differences based on where survivors chose to live out their postwar lives and whether their language of testimony was Yiddish, English, or Hebrew. More than an original presentation of yet-unheard stories, this book challenges the assumption of a universal vocabulary for describing and healing human pain.

Panel will include:

Hannah Pollin-Galay is senior lecturer in the Department of Literature at Tel Aviv University, where she teaches on Yiddish, oral narrative, and memory.

Carolyn J. Dean is Charles J. Stille Professor of History and French at Yale University, and is author of six books including most recently, "The Moral
Witness: Trials and Testimonies after Genocide".

Justin Cammy is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and of Comparative Literature at Smith College. Cammy's publications range from essays on Yiddish literary history to scholarly translations of Yiddish literature to critical introductions to new editions of works by Yiddish writers and memoirists.

James E. Young is Distinguished University Professor of English and Judaic Studies Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and Founding Director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst. He is author of "Writing and Rewriting the Holocaust" (1988), "The Texture of Memory" (1993), "At Memory's Edge: After-images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture" (2000), and "The Stages of
Memory: Reflections on Memorial Art, Loss, and the Spaces Between" (2016).

Moderated by Alon Confino, Pen Tishkach Chair of Holocaust Studies, Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, UMass Amherst.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

Rise Up: Resisting Patriarchy in the Age of Trump

Fri, Jan 25 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Carroll Room, Campus Center

Katherine Spillar, Ms. Magazine editor and co-founder of the Feminist Majority Foundation, with an introduced by President Kathleen McCartney. We've marched. We've rallied. We've voted. And we must keep on fighting to protect and advance our rights at this critical political moment. Spillar will share lessons and strategies from the field to inform and inspire us as we move forward.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Overseen, Unseen, and Unknown: Archaeologies of the Spatial Violence of Colonialism

Fri, Jan 18 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Machmer E24

Dr. Sampeck received her PhD from Tulane in 2007 and is currently an Associate Professor at Illinois State University. Her research focuses on culture and peoples of African descent in Latin America and she developed the Afro-Latin American Archaeology Consortium to support this work internationally. She also has archaeological partnerships with the Eastern Band of Cherokee THPO (Tribal Historic Preservation Office) and has a very strong record of digital humanities scholarship (community-based games and websites) as well as ethically-centered data management systems. Dr. Sampeck’s work has interdisciplinary connections with Native American and Indigenous Studies and with Afro-Latinx scholarship. Aspects of her work are at an innovative point of intersection between language revitalization and archaeology.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Why Digital Archaeology Needs Post-Colonial and Indigenous Perspectives

Mon, Jan 14 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Machmer E24

Dr. Gupta received her PhD from McGill University in 2012 and is currently a post doc at University of New Brunswick. Her work is in the area of comparative decoloniality in India and First Nations communities, adding to our departments strengths without overlapping with current research. She has strong GIS/geospatial, archival, archaeological fieldwork skills, and particular strength in digital archaeology methods studying social unrest and political crisis in post-colonial India. She has authored an open-source online textbook on digital archaeology that she uses to teach Digital Archaeology. 

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Maternal Interventions for Ethical, Political, and Spiritual Transformation

Thu, Feb 28 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, New York Room

A symposium to celebrate and engage Mara Benjamin’s new book, The Obligated Self: Maternal Subjectivity and Jewish Thought (Indiana University Press, 2018). Dr. Emilie Townes, Dean and E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of Womanist Ethics and Society at the Vanderbilt University Divinity School; Dr. Traci Levy, Associate Professor of Political Science at Adelphi University and Mara Benjamin, Irene Kaplan Leiwant Associate Professor of Jewish Studies at Mount Holyoke will investigate the maternal from feminist and womanist perspectives to offer new resources for political, ethical, and theological discourse and to address the urgent needs of the current political moment.

Hosted by the Program in Jewish Studies. Co-sponsored by the Department of Religion, the Department of Gender Studies, the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Politics, the Weissman Center for Leadership, the Division of Student Life & the Office of the Dean of Faculty

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Digital Witnessing in “Jerusalem, We Are Here”

Fri, Apr 26 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst MA 01002

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst presents "Digital Witnessing in 'Jerusalem, We Are Here'”, a screening and discussion with the filmmaker Dorit Naaman, moderated by Olga Gershenson.

“Jerusalem, We Are Here” is an interactive documentary that digitally brings Palestinians back into the Jerusalem neighborhoods from which they were expelled in 1948. Director Dorit Naaman will guide a virtual tour of Palestinian Jerusalem, weaving together pre-1948 memories and documents, with contemporary space politics.

Dorit Naaman is a documentarist and film theorist from Jerusalem, and a professor of Film and Media and Cultural Studies at Queen’s University. Her academic publications focus on Israeli and Palestinian cinemas and media from post-colonialist and feminist perspectives. Her 2016 interactive documentary, “Jerusalem, We Are Here”, offers a model for digital witnessing and has been screened at numerous festivals, conferences, universities, and community events. It can be viewed at https://info.jerusalemwearehere.com/

Olga Gershenson is Professor of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she is also on the Film Studies faculty.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

Ripples in a Pond: The Effects of the Holocaust Over Generations

Wed, May 1 2019 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst MA 01002

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst presents "Ripples in a Pond: The Effects of the Holocaust Over Generations", the 2019 Annual Yom Hashoah Commemorative Event talk by Dr. Tammy Bottner and Deborah Levison.

Dr. Tammy Bottner and Deborah Levison have much in common: both are daughters and granddaughters of Holocaust survivors, and each has written an award-winning book recounting her family’s tale. In their joint presentation, the authors discuss not only their families’ incredible stories of survival, but also the way the Holocaust has affected their own lives.

Dr. Tammy Bottner is a pediatric, adolescent, and integrative medicine physician, and co-founder of Riverside Pediatrics in Newburyport, MA. She is author of "Among the Reeds: The True Story of How a Family Survived the Holocaust".

Deborah Levison’s life has two parts: the first in Canada, where she attended the Royal Conservatory of Music and the University of Toronto, and the second as a journalist based in Connecticut. She is author of "The Crate: A Story of War, a Murder, and Justice".

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

Good Jews: Philosemitism in Post-Holocaust Europe

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst MA 01002

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst presents "Good Jews: Philosemitism in Post-Holocaust Europe", a talk by Daniel Cohen with remarks and moderated Q&A by Daniel Gordon.

While the liberation of Europe in 1945 did not announce the end of antisemitism, Jews, Judaism or Jewishness also acquired positive value in the aftermath of the Shoah. Like antisemitism, European “philosemitic” discourse mutated over time. To counteract the image of the Jewish enemy, secular and Christian “philosemites” imagined various types of loveable “good Jews.” This newfound sympathy is not devoid of ambiguities . But while the demonic Israeli or cosmopolitan Jew continues to fuel antisemitic paranoia, a problematic “philosemitism” also defines the relationship between contemporary Europe and its Jews.

Daniel Gordon (Professor of History, UMass) will offer a brief response and moderate the Q and A.

G. Daniel Cohen is an Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at Rice University (Houston). He has published on forced displacement, Jewish migration, human rights and refugees in the twentieth century. He is now writing a critical history of philosemitism in post-Holocaust Europe, from 1945 to the present.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

The Holocaust and the Nakba: A New Grammar of Trauma and History

Tue, Mar 19 2019 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
IHGMS, 758 N Pleasant St, Amherst

The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst presents a panel discussion of the new book, "The Holocaust and the Nakba: A New Grammar of Trauma and History", edited by Bashir Bashir and Amos Goldberg.

 

In this groundbreaking book, leading Arab and Jewish intellectuals examine how and why the Holocaust and the Nakba are interlinked without blurring fundamental difference between them. The first treatment in English of these two constitutive traumas together, it searches for a new historical and political grammar for relating and narrating their complicated intersections.

 

Panel will include:

 

Bashir Bashir is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology, Political Science and Communication at the Open University of Israel. He is the co-editor of Rethinking the Politics of Israel/Palestine: Partition and Its Alternatives (2014).

 

Amos Goldberg is Senior Lecturer at the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of Trauma in First Person: Diary Writing During the Holocaust (2017)

 

Leila Farsakh is Associate Professor and Chair at the Department of Political Science at UMass Boston. She is the author of Palestinian Labor Migration to

Israel: Labor, Land and Occupation (2012).

 

Laura Jockusch is the Albert Abramson Assistant Professor of Holocaust Studies at the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University. She is the author of Collect and Record! Jewish Holocaust Documentation in Early Postwar Europe (2012).

 

Moderated by Alon Confino, Pen Tishkach Chair of Holocaust Studies, Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, UMass Amherst.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free
Campus contact: 

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