Five College Consortium

Jane Cecil Memorial Lecture

Wed, Oct 24 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Graham Hall-HILLYR

Free and open to the public.

Larry Rosenstock is an urban educational reformer connected who has worked with Silicon Valley entrepreneurs to develop a pilot urban school focused on developing a curricular approach and orientation toward project based learning that could "educate scientists, engineers, and artists." The first school was started in San Diego in 1998 and today the are 13 schools in the High Tech High network.

Rosenstock's work is at the intersection STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) and urban education reform. Rosenstock describes his work, "Public education is the single institution more than any other that best gives one the ability to rise above social disadvantage, yet it is the least changed in our society,” said Rosenstock. “We wanted a school that didn’t focus on where students came from, but creates an environment that challenges all students to think and create – trying on different hats and identities as scientists, engineers and artists.”

He has been awarded the most prestigious awards in the field of education and his work in New Tech High was featured in the award-winning documentary--"Most Likely to Succeed. " We screened this film at Smith several years ago in conjunction with a faculty workshop on the learning sciences. The link to the film is here: teddintersmith.com…

Larry's lecture will be of broad interest to our community:

Faculty interested in his approach to project based learning that weaves together the liberal arts and STEM fields.

Students and faculty interested in urban education, social justice, and school reform.

Students and faculty interested in applied science and math. The pedagogies developed by Rosenstock and utilized at High Tech High are cutting edge in the field.

Public policy students interested in the scaling up of educational reforms.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible

McGrath Lecture w/ Veronika Schapers

Wed, Oct 31 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Alumnae House Conference Hall, Alumnae House Gallery Space

Veronika Schapers is a German book artist who has lived in Japan for 15 years. The Japanese culture and aesthetics have fascinated and influenced her ever since, leaving marks in almost all of her projects. In her talk she will explain her conceptual way of making artist books and also show a selection of her books that are part of the Smith College’s rare book collection.

Veronika’s creative use of materials is what first attracts to her work. Plastic, acrylic, latex, felt, wood, oil, and vintage tissue are unusual substrates in modern bookmaking.

Veronika’s exquisite craftsmanship is also matched with subtle humor in most of her books. Using current events as a springboard for inspiration, she works collaboratively or alone on projects that resonate long after the first viewing. Commenting on the ways and means in which we struggle with various realities, she never omits the joke. Whether she’s producing a book about pension fraud, giant squids, or questioning the university entrance exams, her conception and design prove that books still have the ability to create tension and build narrative.

Campus: 
Smith College
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CHS Fall Pita Pocket Party

Tue, Oct 16 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
The Powerhouse

Please come join us for some food and a chance to mingle with other CHS students and faculty from the 5-Colleges! There will be general information about certificate requirements and CHS classes being offered next semester. We’ll be ordering food from Pita Pockets, located in Amherst. The restaurant offers a variety of vegan and vegetarian options as well; please email us if you have any other dietary restrictions as soon as possible. This event will take place after Dr. Kim Baranowski’s talk.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Keeping Time: Community Fall Back!

Sat, Nov 3 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum

Join us for a free afternoon of time-themed fun at the Mead! 

This year’s Community Day will prepare us for the end of Daylight Saving Time. Learn how farmers have responded to turning the clock back while enjoying veggies from Book and Plow Farm, and participate in a movement workshop to ask how we appreciate the present with Dante Brown, Visiting Assistant Professor of Theater and Dance, and students in the course “Ensemble: Dancing in Community.”

This program is offered in conjunction with the Mead’s exhibition Timing Is Everything and in collaboration with the Arts at Amherst Initiative and Book and Plow Farm. Free and open to all!

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Escaping Slavery, Envisioning Freedom

Tue, Nov 27 2018 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Northampton Center for the Arts

Distinguished historians Erica Armstrong Dunbar and Barbara Krauthamer will explore how enslaved and formerly enslaved African American women envisioned and experienced freedom. This is the capstone event of All Hamptons Read, a community-wide reading of Armstrong Dunbar's award-winning book, Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge. Presented by the UMass Amherst History Department Feinberg Family Distinguished Lecture Series.

Free and open to the public. Book signing to follow.

Campus: 
Other
Directions and parking info: 
33 Hawley St Northampton, MA 01060
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Contact email: 
communications@umass.edu
Campus contact: 

All Organizing is Science Fiction

Tue, Nov 13 2018 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Student Union Ballroom

Educator, writer, public scholar and spoken word artist Walidah Imarisha will explore the history of sci-fi and social change, sharing tools for using science fiction as a practice ground for social justice strategizing and vision. Imarisha is co-author with adrienne maree brown of Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements. Presented by the UMass Amherst History Department Feinberg Family Distinguished Lecture Series.

Free and open to the public. Book signing to follow

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Event contact: 
Adeline Broussan
Contact email: 
communications@umass.edu
Campus contact: 

Author Talks: Paul Chappell

Thu, Nov 8 2018 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
W.E.B. Du Bois Library, Room: 2601, Floor 26

Paul K. Chappell is the Peace Literacy Director for the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. He graduated from West Point in 2002, was deployed to Iraq in 2006, and left active duty in 2009 as a Captain. Chappell drew on his time in the military and his multiracial identity to introduce the concept of Peace Literacy (peaceliteracy.org), which he offers as a new paradigm to better understand not just peace and war, but also the art of living and what it means to be human. Chappell develops these ideas further in his seven-book series The Road to Peace

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Dreams and Nightmares – The Promises and Perils of Revolutionary Visions

Mon, Nov 5 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies 758 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA

What is at stake, and what is at risk, in the building of new worlds? Five College faculty will deliver short presentations and lead a community conversation on the nightmarish visions of social transformation and oppressive aspects of liberatory movements around the world. Presented by the UMass Amherst History Department Feinberg Family Distinguished Lecture Series.

Free and open to the public.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
From the main UMass Amherst campus, head north on North Pleasant Street. The Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies is on the left, just past the traffic circle.
Not accessible
Event contact: 
Adeline Broussan
Contact email: 
communications@umass.edu
Campus contact: 

Domestic Workers Building Dignity and Power, Past and Present

Thu, Nov 1 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Goodell Hall, Bernie Dallas Room

Domestic workers are organizing on a massive scale to build economies that respect the labor of women of color. This panel of organizers and historians will discuss the goals and challenges facing the domestic workers’ movement. Panelists will explore how the rich history of domestic worker organizing can inform present-day struggles for dignity and respect, and inform the creation of alternative feminist economies that respect the labor of women of color.

About the Panelists

Linda Burnham, Senior Advisor at the National Domestic Workers Alliance has worked for decades as an activist, writer and strategist, focused on women’s rights and racial justice. She co-founded the Women of Color Resource Center, where she served as Executive Director for 18 years. Burnham has published numerous articles on African-American women, African-American politics, and feminist theory in a wide range of periodicals and anthologies. She edited and contributed to the anthology, Changing the Race: Racial Politics and the Election of Barack Obama. Her article, “No Plans to Abandon Our Freedom Dreams” was widely circulated online in the wake of the 2016 election. Her recently completed research, Living in the Shadows: Latina Domestic Workers in the Texas-Mexico Border Region, coauthored with Lisa Moore, was published in 2018 and she is currently working on a book about domestic worker organizing. Burnham’s writing and organizing are part of a lifelong inquiry into the dynamic, often perilous intersections of race, class and gender.

Jennifer Guglielmo is an associate professor of history at Smith College who has published on a range of topics, including working-class feminisms, anarchism, whiteness and the Italian diaspora. Her book, Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945 (University of North Carolina Press, 2010) received several national awards, including the Saloutos Award for best book in U.S. immigration history and the Marraro Book Prize from the American Historical Association and Society for Italian Historical Studies. For the last three years, she and Prof. Michelle Joffroy (Smith College) have worked closely with the Matahari Women Workers’ Center in Boston to assist their use of history as an organizing tool. In 2017, they secured a grant of over $1 million to expand this work into a two-year popular education initiative with the National Domestic Workers Alliance.

Monique Tú Nguyen, Executive Director of the Matahari Women Workers’ Center.

Diana Sierra Becerra (moderator) is a historian, popular educator, and organizer. Her book manuscript, tentatively titled Insurgent Butterflies: Gender and Revolution in El Salvador, documents the feminist praxis that working-class and peasant women developed within labor and armed movements during the late 20th century. As a postdoctoral fellow, she is developing the project Putting History in Domestic Workers’ Hands, a popular education initiative to empower and mobilize domestic workers on a massive scale. The project is a collaboration between Smith College academics and organizers from the National Domestic Workers Alliance. Sierra Becerra is also an organizer at the Pioneer Valley Workers Center, an organization that builds the collective power of immigrants and workers.

Presented by the UMass Amherst History Department Feinberg Family Distinguished Lecture Series.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
If you need directions or additional assistance to plan your visit, or to request specific accommodations, please contact the History Department's communications assistant, Adeline Broussan, at communications@umass.edu.
Accessible location
Event contact: 
Adeline Broussan
Contact email: 
communications@umass.edu
Campus contact: 

ITL Delcourt Lecture

Wed, Nov 7 2018 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Weinstein Auditorium

Blending Local and Global: A Conversation with Alice Delcourt '99

Alice Delcourt ’99 trained at prestigious restaurants in London and with famous Italian Chefs Andrea Provenzani and Viviana Varese before opening her own farm-to-table restaurant in Milan in 2010.  Our conversation will reveal Alice’s path from a GOV/ITL major at Smith to being the woman chef/owner of Erba Brusca, a popular farm-to-table restaurant in Milan, Italy.  Alice grows many vegetables in the restaurant’s patio gardens and aims to increase awareness of sustainability through human and natural resources that go into growing and preparing food.

Campus: 
Smith College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

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