Five College Consortium

#NoFilter: Drinking Water Hackathon

Fri, Sep 28 2018 - 12:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Dining Commons, Middle Dining Room

How can we provide safe, sustainable, and equitable drinking water for all? You tell us! Join fellow students, faculty, engineers, social justice advocates, and policy experts as we “hack” our way to a better water system. Lunch is provided. Pre-register to reserve your spot!

Learn more at http://hamp.it/kernevents

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-559-5949
Campus contact: 

Drinking Water Policy and Advocacy Panel Discussion

Wed, Sep 26 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:15pm
Location: 
Franklin Patterson Hall, East Lecture Hall

Join Clean Water Action's Marisol Fernandez y Mora and UMass Amherst professors Emily Kumpel, Eve Vogel, and David Reckhow for dinner and a deep dive on drinking water. We’ll discuss the policies that shape our water systems, issues of equity and access, and how to advocate for safe and sustainable water. 

This panel is part of a series of events examining the intersection of policy, technology, and environmental justice in drinking water. Inspired by the on-site water treatment system at the R.W. Kern Center, we’re exploring questions of sustainability and social justice in drinking water: What policies and structures shape our current systems? Who is well served by these systems; who isn’t? And how can we provide safe, sustainable, and equitable access to drinking water for all?

Meet the Panelists:
Dr. David Reckhow is a professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and director of the Water Innovation Network for Sustainable Small Systems at UMass Amherst.
Dr. Emily Kumpel is an assistant professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she focuses on global water quality issues and urban water infrastructure.
Marisol Fernandez y Mora is a drinking water advocate with Clean Water Action Massachusetts, where they focus on environmental justice issues of lead in drinking water.
Dr. Eve Vogel is an assistant professor of political and environmental geography at the University of Massachusetts Amherst; she investigates the human-environmental dynamics of ecosystems.

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-559-5949
Campus contact: 

Environmental & Climate Justice Lecture with Jacqui Patterson

Mon, Sep 24 2018 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
FPH, Main Lecture Hall

Join us for reception and a lecture with Jacqueline Patterson in the Main Lecture Hall on Monday, September 24 at 6pm.

6pm: Reception
6:30pm: Lecture

Jacqueline Patterson is Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program, the organization's largest program. She has worked in many capacities on many issues including, women's rights, violence against women, HIV/AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice. In 2007, she co-founded Women of Color United, an organization that connects women of color in the United States to women abroad.

Jacqui received a Masters degree in Social Work from the University of Maryland, and a Master's degree in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins University. She serves on the International Committee for the US Social Forum, the Steering Committee for Interfaith Moral Action on Climate, Advisory Board for the Center for Earth Ethics as well as the Boards of Directors for the Institute of the Black World, Center for Story Based Strategy and the US Climate Action Network.

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Mimi Sheller Lecture

Tue, Oct 23 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Dwight Hall 101

As part of its speaker series on current information and technology issues which affect society at large, LITS welcomes Mimi Sheller, Professor of Sociology at Drexel University. Dr. Sheller studies the social, political, and environmental impacts of aluminum mining and technology waste. 

Geomedia, Mining, and Mobility Justice: The Matter of Cloud Computing and Bitcoin

Technology never operates on its own, but is always about how people use it, how we put things together and make them work. The “material turn” in media studies and mobilities research highlights the geopolitical and socioecological power relations behind technologies like cloud computing and cryptocurrencies. There is a transnational material and ecological basis for communication infrastructures and virtual media geographies which pose crucial problems of mobility justice. Every historical period involves specific assemblages of transport, logistics, communication, and energy infrastructures, from the coal-fired steam train to the caffeine-fueled WiFi café, along with the pollution and waste these systems leave behind: “the materiality of information technology starts from the soil, and underground” in metals such as cobalt and gallium, tantalum and germanium, bauxite and aluminum (Parikka 2012). This talk will introduce the new interdisciplinary fields of Mobilities Research and Geomedia Studies and reveal the politics of infrastructure through examples such as cloud computing, e-waste, and Bitcoin.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Art of Is

Tue, Sep 25 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum

The Mead is teaming up with the first-year seminar Thinking Through Improvisation, taught by Darryl Harper, visiting professor of music, to bring Stephen Nachmanovitch to campus. Nachmanovitch, author of Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art, argues that improvisation and creativity are important tools for everyone. Join us for a talk by Nachmanovitch about the connection between time and improvisation.

This program is offered in conjunction with Thinking Through Improvisation First-Year Seminar and the Arts at Amherst Initiative. This program is also a part of the Keeping Time Program Series: a series of conversations, performances, and workshops offered in conjunction with the Mead’s exhibition, Timing Is Everything. This series will bring guests from across disciplines to share their work with the public and engage in conversations about how time impacts their practices. Keeping Time programs are free and open to all!

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-5651
Campus contact: 

Book Salon with Betsy Krause on Tight Knit: Global Families and the Social Life of Fast Fashion

Wed, Oct 17 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street, South Hadley, MA

Join us for a discussion of Tight Knit: Global Families and the Social Life of Fast Fashion (University of Chicago Press) by Betsy Krause (Professor of Anthropology, UMass Amherst).

The coveted “Made in Italy” label calls to mind visions of nimble-fingered Italian tailors lovingly sewing elegant, high-end clothing. The phrase evokes a sense of authenticity, heritage, and rustic charm. Yet, as Betsy Krause uncovers in Tight Knit, Chinese migrants are the ones sewing “Made in Italy” labels into low-cost items for a thriving fast-fashion industry—all the while adding new patterns to the social fabric of Italy’s iconic industry. Krause offers a revelatory look into how families involved in the fashion industry are coping with globalization based on longterm research in Prato, the historic hub of textile production in the heart of metropolitan Tuscany. She brings to the fore the tensions—over value, money, beauty, family, care, and belonging—that are reaching a boiling point as the country struggles to deal with the same migration pressures that are triggering backlash all over Europe and North America.

Discussants: Anna Botta (Professor of Italian Studies and Comparative Literature, Smith College), Calvin Chen (Associate Professor of Politics, Mount Holyoke College), Anne Ciecko (Associate Professor of Communication, UMass Amherst), and Vanessa Fong (Professor of Anthropology, Amherst College)

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology at UMass Amherst

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Directions and parking info: 
https://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc/directions_parking
Accessible location
Accessibility info: 
For any event accessibility needs, please contact the Center at 413-538-2275 or fcwsrc@fivecolleges.edu in advance
Contact phone: 
413-538-2275
Campus contact: 

21st Annual Eqbal Ahmad Lecture & Symposium presents JACKSON RISING

Thu, Nov 8 2018 - 4:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
RCC

Announcing the 21st annual Eqbal Ahmad Lecture and Two-Day Symposium, November 8-9, 2018 at Hampshire College

Jackson Rising: Participatory Democracy, Solidarity Economy, and the Struggle for Racial Justice in Jackson, Mississippi
November 8, 2018, 4 pm
Robert Crown Center

In 2017, newly elected mayor Antar Lumumba pledged to make Jackson “the most radical city on the planet,” building on decades of work toward the creation of a solidarity economy and alternative institutions like people’s assemblies and workers cooperatives. Join our intergenerational panel of brilliant political strategists Rukia Lumumba, Dr. Safiya Omari, and Charles Taylor as they discuss the history of organizing for economic democracy, Black self-determination, and political transformation in Jackson and beyond.

Workshop and Activist Exchange: Cooperation Jackson and Soul Fire Farm
November 9, 2018, 12-3pm
Join us for this exciting presentation followed by an activist workshop & exchange to learn about Black-lead cooperative economics, food sovereignty, and the role of environmental justice in the fight against racism and state violence. Our panelists will join Iya’falola Omobola, former co-director of Cooperation Jackson, and regional activists from Soul Fire Farm for an opportunity to learn from one another’s experiences. This workshop is open to all. Please stay tuned for more details and RSVP information.

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-559-6040
Campus contact: 

Encounters of Shoah and Nakba in Palestinian and Arabic novels: talk by Sadia Agsous

Wed, Oct 3 2018 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Herter Hall 601

The Shoah is a theme which is present in the Arabic novel, spanning a broad geographical space from North Africa (Boualem Sansal, Anouar Benmalek) to the Middle East (Ghassan Kanafani, Rabai al-Madhoun, Elias Khoury...). This talk will focus on the articulation of the Shoah in the Palestinian and Lebanese novel since the 1960s. Indeed, the Palestinian novelist Ghassan Kanafani seems to be the first Arab author to have presented a Jewish-Israeli character in his novella, Return to Haifa (1969) which was followed later by other Palestinian writers and by the Lebanese writer Elias Khoury. The particularity of these literary works is that they convene both the Shoah and the Nakba for an encounter of painful memories shared by Jews and Palestinians that only literature allows and admits at the present time. 

Sadia Agsous is a postdoctoral fellow at The French research center in Jerusalem (CRFJ) with the support of the Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah. Her research is focused on the cultural production (Arabic-Hebrew) of Palestinians in Israel (literature, cinema and media), on the Palestinian translators of Hebrew literature and on the Holocaust in the Arabic novel. Her book J’écris en hébreu, mais en arabe: L’identité palestinienne à l’épreuve dans l’écriture romanesque en hébreu is under contract with Classiques Garnier (2019).

Presented by the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
Herter Hall is located on the UMass Amherst campus at 161 Presidents Dr, Amherst MA, 01003
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-835-0221
Campus contact: 

Exploring Palestinian and Hebrew Literature: seminar with Anton Shammas and Hannan Hever

Thu, Oct 4 2018 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Herter Hall 601

In this seminar, open to all students and faculty, we shall read two poems, by Muhammad Ali Taha and Yehuda Amichai, and discuss their significance within Palestinian and Hebrew literature.

Anton Shammas is a Professor of Middle Eastern and Comparative Literature, University of Michigan.

Hannan Hever is Jacob & Hilda Blaustein Professor of Hebrew Language & Literature and Comparative Literature, Yale University.

Alon Confino is Professor of History and of Jewish and Near Eastern Studies, Pen Tishkach Chair of Holocaust Studies, and the Director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, UMass Amherst.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst, UMass Department of History, UMass Program in Comparative Literature, and UMass Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
Herter Hall is located on the UMass Amherst campus at 161 Presidents Dr, Amherst MA, 01003.
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-835-0221
Campus contact: 

1948: To De-Nakbafy Sanat al-Iḥtilāl, "The Year of Occupation”: keynote talk by Anton Shammas

Fri, Oct 5 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Herter Hall 601

1948: To De-Nakbafy Sanat al-Iḥtilāl, "The Year of Occupation”
Keynote talk by Anton Shammas

In 1948, “the year of iḥtilāl/occupation,” the Palestinians were pushed out of history, out of time, suppressed into the unconscious of the Jewish state and, in the cartography of catastrophes, Palestine was mapped out while Israel was mapped in. In a series of personal reflections, this talk will argue that, unlike a Nakbah, an occupation can, theoretically speaking, be undone; that instead of a timeless, abstract notion of catastrophe that leaves the culprit outside the semantic field of the crime, as if it was an irreversible act of nature, iḥtilāl/occupation marks a signified in a concrete, contiguous manner, de-Nakbafying 1948 and connecting it to 1967, ever threatening to cross the bar into Israeli consciousness, back into time and history.

A Professor of Comparative Literature and Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, since 1997, Anton Shammas is a Palestinian writer and translator of Arabic, Hebrew and English. His publications include a novel in Hebrew (translated into 9 languages), two collections of poems and a book for children in Hebrew; a collection of poems in Arabic; and many articles, essays and translations in the three languages. He is currently working on a book manuscript: Blind Spots and other essays on translation.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at UMass Amherst, UMass Department of History, UMass Program in Comparative Literature, and UMass Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Directions and parking info: 
Herter Hall is located on the UMass Amherst campus at 161 Presidents Dr, Amherst MA, 01003.
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-835-0221
Campus contact: 

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