Choral Society Commencement Concert

Sat, May 20 2017 - 9:15pm to 10:15pm
Location: 
Buckley Recital Hall

Tickets are $10 for the general public and $5 for senior citizens, students and children 12 and under. Five College student tickets are free. Tickets may be purchased at the door, beginning at 8:15 p.m.; during Commencement registration in the Alumni House; or in advance, by contacting Ms. Chernin at mchernin@amherst.edu or 413/542-2484.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
$10 for the general public and $5 for senior citizens, students, and children 12 and under.
Campus contact: 

Desis Divided: A Panel Discussion

Fri, Apr 28 2017 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
Center for Humanistic Inquiry (Second Floor of the Frost Library)

Please join us for a panel discussion on Sangay Mishra’s Desis Divided: The Political Lives of South Asian Americans (University of Minnesota Press, 2016). Focusing on Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi American communities, Desis Divided analyzes features such as class, religion, nation of origin, language, caste, gender, and sexuality in mobilization and shows how these internal characteristics lead to multiple paths of political inclusion, defying a unified group experience.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Feminism, Science, and Corporeal Politics: The Case of Affective Kinship

Wed, Apr 26 2017 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
FPH East Lecture Hall

A talk by Dr. Victoria Pitts-Taylor.

Feminist critiques of biological approaches to kinship have often condemned their determinism – their treatment of biology as fixed genetic blueprint for social organization – and their ignorance of, or dismissal of, familial structures that do not follow heteronormative reproductive imperatives. But a focus on how kinships are socially shaped is not sufficient to address the bodily, material experience that David Eng, in The Feeling of Kinship, insists are part of all kinships. Can bodies be more seriously included in feminist and queer understanding of kinships? Can visceral, felt bonds between people be understood asboth biologically and socially enabled? And can biological accounts of bodily, felt relations be reclaimed from heteronormativity? Victoria Pitts-Taylor poses these questions in a discussion based on her recent book, The Brain’s Body: Neuroscience and Corporeal Politics (Duke University Press, 2016).

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Five College Undergraduate Anthropology Conference

Sat, Apr 15 2017 - 8:30am to 3:00pm
Location: 
Willits Hallowell

All Anthropology students are invited to attend our Annual Five College Undergraduate Anthropology Conference. Please come support your fellow classmates, and Anthropology Majors from the Five College Consortium. The event starts at 8:30 a.m. in the Morrison Room at Willits Hallowell Conference Center. Presentations start at 9:00 a.m. in their designated rooms, pick up a program upon entering for more information.

Five College Undergraduate Anthropology Conference

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Faith Kares (Mount Holyoke College, ’03). Dr. Kares received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Northwestern University in 2015. She has served as a Postdoctoral Researcher and Project Manager at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry and is currently transitioning to a position in the City of Chicago Inspector General’s Office. Her keynote lecture will develop how ethnographic research and anthropological concepts help us address police (mis)conduct and improve community-police relations.

If you have any questions, please contact Michelle Pietras at mpietras@mtholyoke.edu.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Event contact: 
Michelle Pietras
Contact email: 
mpietras@mtholyoke.edu
Campus contact: 

"Freedom of Speech Under Assault on Campus": A Talk by Daniel Jacobson

Thu, Apr 13 2017 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Beneski Earth Sciences Building, Paino Lecture Hall

Philosopher Daniel Jacobson of the University of Michigan will present the second lecture in the 2016-17 Forry and Micken Lecture Series on "Speech and Harm." His lecture is titled "Freedom of Speech Under Assault on Campus," and will be presented in Paino Lecture Hall (Beneski 107) on Thursday, April 13, at 5 p.m.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Five College Chemistry Seminar

Thu, Apr 13 2017 - 11:30am to 12:30pm
Location: 
Lederle Graduate Research Center Room 1634

On April 13, Professor Sam Houk of the Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, and Ames National Laboratory, will give a seminar on "Mass Spectrometry from Atoms to Metabolites: Fundamentals and Applications of ICP-MS and Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization."

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Death of Leviathan: Protest Politics and State Phobia

Wed, Apr 12 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

The Political Science and the Sexuality, Women’s & Gender Studies Departments of Amherst College present: The Death of Leviathan: Protest Politics and State Phobia.

This event is free and open to the public.

Presented by Nikita Dhawan, professor of political science and director of the Research Platform Gender Studies: “Identities-Discourses-Transformations” at the University of Innsbruck, Austria.

Nikita Dhawan will examine the romantic enthusiasm evoked by the protest movements that seek to reconfigure international politics by way of interpellating a global demos that has been wronged by the neoliberal beast, and how they erase the exploitative and exclusionary material conditions that make possible the exercise of agency of the global citizens.

This event is being sponsored by the Lurcy Fund, the Lamont Fund, the Political Science and the Sexuality, Women’s & Gender Studies Departments of Amherst College.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Reporting Muslims and Arabs in the Anglo-American Media

Tue, Apr 18 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall Room 201

The Anglo-American media coverage of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is dominated by news of conflict. There is no doubt that the region has seen many conflicts throughout the 20th century and into the 21st century, from anti-colonial uprisings, to the Arab-Israeli conflict, to the rise of militant religious groups like Al-Qaeda and the self-declared Islamic State (or ISIS), to recent Arab “revolts”. Nevertheless, the coverage of the MENA region in mainstream Anglo-American media has been impacted by currents of “Orientalism” that perpetrate negative stereotypes and connotations about Arabs and Muslims, which in turn reinforce Islamophopic sentiments in mainstream news discourse and various sectors of the Anglo-American society, and engender hate and fear against Arabs in general and Muslims specifically. This lecture will explore the coverage of Arabs and Muslims in the Anglophone media, by drawing on examples from the news coverage in Britain and the United States.

Dr. Zahera Harb is senior lecturer in International Journalism at City University of London. She has more than 11 years of experience as a journalist in Lebanon working for Lebanese and international media organizations. She is also a board member of Ethical Journalism Network. Her recent publications include Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communications Practices in Lebanon and Palestine (IB Tauris 2017). She is review editor for the Journal of Media Practice.
Sponsored by the Smith College Religion Department, Government Department, Endowed Lecture Fund, Lewis Global Studies Center, and the Five College Lecture Fund.
Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

Koh Isha: A Concert of Jewish Music

Mon, May 1 2017 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Jewish Community Center of Amherst

Music from across the diaspora, including works by Salamone Rossi, wordless Ashkenazi tunes, and Sephardic folk songs from Spain, Bosnia, and Turkey.

Included: heartbreak, advice from mothers to daughters, lullabies, liturgy, and at least one song about a king.

Campus: 
Other
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

The Happiest Song Plays Last (English and Español)

Sat, Apr 15 2017 (All day)
Location: 
Fine Arts Center

There’s power in family traditions. There’s power in the songs sung and the food served at gatherings. They bind families and communities together across time and distance.

Pulitzer-winner Quiara Alegía Hudes’ The Happiest Song Plays Last follows Puerto Rican cousins Elliot and Yaz as they navigate their haunted pasts and uncertain futures in the shifting political climate of a post-9/11 world. Elliot, a former marine, is now a military consultant for a war film in Jordan; while Yaz, a music professor, opens her house to feed and assist the local community in North Philadelphia. Against the backdrop of the Arab Spring, Elliot and an international cast of characters explore and negotiate their identities as politically marginalized persons in worlds and cultures that often erase and silence their narratives. Elliot and Yaz must not only find ways of protest and language to end the cyclical violence that haunts their family, but also find music to feed and heal their souls.

“This play promotes cultural pride and understanding. It not only provides space for us to strengthen connections to our own cultural roots, but also helps us investigate our identities as global citizens in the current political climate,” shares director Jennifer Onopa.

The play is a complex mixture, balancing epic historical events with intimate life moments, all of them connected through the wonders of modern technology and the richness of Puerto Rican cuatro music.

The UMass Theater Department has assembled an appropriately diverse cast and creative team to bring these characters’ stories to the stage. The production features a local musician who will perform the cuatro live at every performance.

“Our hope is to engage with diverse audiences within and around the area.  We look forward to several pre- and post-show events with community groups, ranging from CMASS to UMass Veterans, during which audiences, community members, and theatre artists can engage in dialogue about various aspects of the play,” says Onopa.

Production dramaturg Gaven D. Trinidad says, “Music, language, and theatre are mediums through which we can imagine new worlds of diversity and equality. Let’s sing, imagine, and create something new together.”

The Happiest Song Plays Last runs April 5 – 15 at the UMass Fine Arts Center.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

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