Sami Schalk: 'Bodyminds Re-imagined'

Fri, Mar 30 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Campus Center 208 Multipurpose Room

As part of the 5-college Disability Studies conference, Sami Schalk will give a talk and lecture from her new book. 

Sami Schalk, University of Wisconsin-Madison, will explore how black women's speculative fiction offers new imaginings of embodiment. Schalk's talk will be drawn from her new book "Bodyminds Reimagined" available spring 2018.

Bridging black feminist theory with disability studies, Schalk demonstrates that speculative fiction's political potential lies in author's creation of bodyminds that transcend reality's limitations.

The Office of Disability Studies will be hosting Schalk as part of a student disability studies conference that will run from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. the same day. Three student panels will present talks, and local faculty will offer response afterward. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public
Contact phone: 
415-513-2970

SWG Guest Dean Spade

Fri, Mar 30 2018 - 4:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Weinstein Auditorium

Dean Spade, founder of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, author of Normal Life, and Associate Professor at Seattle University School of Law, will give a talk “Getting Together, Tearing It Apart” 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
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Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Landscape Studies - Carolyn Finney

Thu, Mar 29 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 106
Landscape Studies Program presents Carolyn Finney

LSS Presents Carolyn Finney--'Black Faces, White Faces & the Possibility of US'

Carolyn Finney, Ph.D., is a writer, performer and cultural geographer. As a professor in geography at the University of Kentucky, she is deeply interested in issues related to identity, difference, creativity and resilience. In particular, she explores how issues of difference impact participation in decision-making processes designed to address environmental issues. More broadly she likes to trouble our theoretical and methodological edges that shape knowledge production and determine whose knowledge counts. This special Landscape Studies presentation is open to the entire Smith College community.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

'Queer Visualities' with Moon Charania

Thu, Mar 29 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Dewey Hall Common Room
Cory Albertson and Moon Charania
Terie Fleury

Moon Charania offers a nuanced analysis of many figures of Muslim wo/men that travel in transnational media, books and film, fruitfully troubling and radically expanding our knowledge of the place of gender, sexuality and racialization in the (neo-)colonial production of otherness and its materialized deployment in global politics. Charania uses dominant images of Muslim women and men to direct a critical gaze toward photography and toward the systems that use visual practice to both name themselves as free and identify the other as dangerous or desirable, where the possibility of both are read through the landscape of the brown body.

Sociologist Moon Charania has published essays in various journals and collections, most recently, in Sexualities. She has taught Feminist Studies, Global Perspectives on Violence Against Women, Sexuality and Islam at both Tulane University and Georgia State University. She lives in Atlanta

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Transfiguring Boys Love Media in Asia

Wed, Mar 28 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Graham Hall-HILLYR

"Transfiguring Boys Love (BL) Media in Asia"

James Welker is associate professor in the Department of Cross Cultural Studies at Kanagawa University in Tokyo,
Japan. He is also a co-founder and current co-chair
of the Society for Queer Asian Studies, an affiliate of the
Association for Asian Studies. His research has focused on gender and sexuality in shojo manga (girls’ comics) and
on the lesbian community in Japan. His first book Transfigurations: Feminists, Lesbians and Shojo Manga Fans in Late Twentieth Century Japan (forthcoming from University of Hawaii Press) examines female genders and
sexualities in Japan in the 1970s and 1980s. He also co-edited Queer Voices from Japan: First Person Narratives of Japan’s Sexual Minorities, and Rethinking Japanese Feminisms (University of Hawaii Press 2018). His articles have been published in peer reviewed journals such as Signs and Mechademia, as well as included in anthologies such
as Boys Love Manga and Beyond: History, Culture and Community in Japan, Asia PacifiQueer: Rethinking Genders
and Sexualities (Fran Martin and Peter A. Jackson, eds.).
His talk will be appealing to Five College faculty and students interested in East Asia (particularly Japan), Japanese popular culture, gender and sexuality in East Asia. Students and faculty in gender and sexuality studies may find a comparative perspective of interest as well.

Sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, the Program in East Asian Studies, and the Program for the Study of Women and Gender.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
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Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Ocean Vuong Poetry Reading

Tue, Mar 27 2018 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Alumnae House Conference Hall

Born a rice farm near Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, OCEAN VUONG came with family to live in Hartford as a toddler, and before turning thirty was hailed by BuzzFeed Books as one of “32 Essential Asian American Writers.” His blazing debut collection, Night Sky with Exit Wounds, has garnered a slew of honors, including a Whiting Award, the citation for which praises how these poems “unflinchingly face the legacies of violence and cultural displacement but…also assume a position of wonder before the world.” His poems are whispered prayers of the body that seek a pathway out of trauma through intimacy. Daniel Wenger writes in the New Yorker that reading his work is like “watching a fish move” through the “currents of English with muscled intuition.” As described by The New York Times, Vuong is a poet who “captures specific moments in time with both photographic clarity and a sense of the evanescence of all earthly things,” at once uncovering and resurfacing histories that are interwoven with the present. His poems have been featured in The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Nation, New Republic, and The Village Voice. Vuong was selected by Foreign Policy magazine as one of 2016’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers, alongside Hillary Clinton and Ban Ki-Moon. He holds an MFA from NYU, and recently joined the faculty of the MFA Program at UMass Amherst.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Loretta Ross Lecture Series

Tue, Mar 27 2018 - 7:00pm to 8:15pm
Location: 
Campus Center 205
Loretta Ross Series II

Social justice activist Loretta Ross presents the next event in the lecture series "White Supremacy in the U.S. Today."

The topic of the March 27 session is "Understanding Charlottesville--What is the Alt-Right?" Understanding the scope and impact of the white supremacist movement on today's US politics is vital for organizing the resistance and building a human rights movement. This workshop series will discuss recent events, analyze the history and components of the white supremacist movement and their mainstream counterparts, and offer steps all human rights activists can use to effectively defend democracy. The concept of "Appropriate Whiteness" is a more useful concept than white guilt for people who commit to the struggle as co-collaborators than allies.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

17-18 Chaired Professor Lecture Series

Tue, Mar 27 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 106

Virginia Hayssen, Mary Maples Dunn Professor of Biological Sciences, will give her inaugural lecture, "Misconceptions about conception and other fallacies: historical bias in reproductive biology," on Tuesday, January 30 at 5 p.m. in Seelye 106. All are welcome.

Lynne Yamamoto, Jessie Wells Post Professor of Art, will give her inaugural lecture, "Borrowing Time: Inscriptions of Class and Memory," on Tuesday, March 20 at 5 p.m. in Seelye 106. All are welcome.

Sam Intrator, Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor of Education and Child Study, will give his inaugural lecture, "Playing for Change: Out-of-School Programming's Quest to Close Opportunity Gaps," on Tuesday, March 27 at 5 p.m. in Seelye 106. All are welcome.

Susan Voss, Achilles Professor of Engineering, will give her inaugural lecture, "Engineering & Hearing: Sound transmission through the ear," on Tuesday, April 3 at 5 p.m. in Seelye 106. All are welcome.

Susan Levin, Professor of Philosophy and Roe/Straut Professor in the Humanities, will give her inaugural lecture, "Posthuman Bliss: A Combustible Mix of Flaws and Fantasy," on Tuesday, April 24 at 5 p.m. in Seelye 106. All are welcome.

www.smith.edu…

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
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Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Kahn lecture: Zahera Harb, journalist

Mon, Mar 26 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 201
"Covering Regional Conflicts in Arab News: Political Loyalties and Hate Speech"

Zahera Harb, a correspondent who provided coverage of war in South Lebanon, a leading television news producer and anchor in Lebanon, and now a senior lecturer in international journalism at City University of London, will address how recent political and military developments in the Arab region have resulted in Arab news media organizations becoming fully fledged political actors in the region. She will explore how 24 Arabic news channels, including Al-Jazeera, have been actively disseminating and propagating political ideologies enforcing political hegemonies that match certain political affiliations in the region. She will also examine examples of hate speech in the media amid a battle to reinforce political loyalties.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

Economics Annual Lecture: David Cutler

Mon, Mar 26 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Stoddard Hall Auditorium
Health Care in America: A Play in Two Acts

"Health Care in America: A Play in Two Acts." David Cutler is the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics at Harvard University and was the Senior Health Care Advisor for the Obama Presidential Campaign.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public

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