2018-2019 LJST Seminar Series – Law and Illiberalism "Weaponizing Pluralism and the Dilemmas of Illiberal Speech"

Mon, Apr 29 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Clark House, room 100
"Weaponizing Pluralism and the Dilemmas of Illiberal Speech"

On Monday, April 29 at 4:30pm in Clark House Room 100 at Amherst College, Elizabeth Anker, Professor of English and Associate Member of the Law Faculty at Cornell University, will present a paper titled “Weaponizing Pluralism and the Dilemmas of Illiberal Speech.” This is the final presentation in a series of seminars that will take place this year on the theme “Law and Illiberalism.”

Professor Anker’s field of research includes human rights, law and literature, immigration law, and legal and political theory. She is the author of Fictions of Dignity: Embodying Human Rights in World Literature (Cornell, 2012). She is currently writing two books, On Paradox: Rights and the Claims of Theory and Our Constitutional Metaphors: Law, Culture, and the Management of Crisis.

To receive a copy of the paper which will be presented, please email the LJST Department assistant coordinator at slaizer@amherst.edu

https://www.amherst.edu/academiclife/departments/ljst/events

About the seminar series – Law and Illiberalism

With increasing pressure on liberal constitutional values in the United States and abroad, legal institutions face complex challenges. Such taken-for-granted phenomena as judicial independence, freedom of the press, and a commitment to truth are now under attack. "Law and Illiberalism" is designed to explore how legal institutions and legal officials can and should respond to those challenges.

What techniques and resources does law offer in the face of growing illiberalism? How can law check executive power when the executive insists that there is no difference between law and politics? What is law’s role in policing, protecting, framing truth in a world of radical lying and dissembling? What happens to free speech notions that the answer to bad and even false speech is more speech in a world of Facebook and Twitter? What pressures do such technologies place on liberal legal regimes? Does law have a role to play in protecting scientific truth? What lessons can be learned from examining other places or times when liberal values were under attack?

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Freedom in the World 2019: Democracy in Retreat

Mon, Apr 29 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Beneski Earth Sciences Building, Paino Lecture Hall
Sarah Repucci

Sarah Repucci is Freedom House’s senior director of research and analysis. In this capacity, she leads the team producing Freedom House’s flagship research and analysis reports, including: Freedom in the World, Freedom on the Net, and Nations in Transit. Repucci has more than ten years’ experience in research and evaluation techniques in the areas of democracy, human rights, and good governance. Previously she worked for Transparency International and the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights, and as an independent consultant for a range of NGOs, bilateral and multilateral organizations, and private businesses.

The event is being sponsored by the Lamont Fund and the Political Science Department of Amherst College.

This event is free and open to the public.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Simone Hyater-Adams: Physics Seminar Lecture

Tue, Apr 23 2019 - 4:15pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Cleveland Hall, L-3
Simone Hyater-Adams

There is a current push to understand and address the underrepresentation of people of color in physics and in STEM more broadly. This talk discusses research that works to explore this through studies of identity and practice.

This work is premised on an understanding that the systems of oppression operate within the culture of physics, and postulates that bridging the gaps between science and art can help us begin to address this challenge. In this talk, Hyater-Adams will describe three ongoing studies that explore these ideas. The first is an overview of the Critical Physics Identity (CPI) framework, a methodological tool to understand the structural and systemic factors that impact the ways that folks identify with the physics discipline. The second applies the CPI framework for an analysis of black physicists' narratives in order to highlight themes in the institutional and structural resources that mold their physics identities. The third explores ways that the performing arts might be used as a tool to address the issues found from the analysis of these narratives. This talk concludes with a working model for informal physics programs designed to support student identity that incorporates the content and practices from the performing arts and from physics.

Hyater-Adams is a Ph.D. candidate at the ATLAS Institute, College of Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Lecture, Dr. Charles Nelson, "Early Profound Deprivation and Brain Development"

Fri, Apr 26 2019 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Commonwealth Honors College Room: Event Hall East

Charles Nelson, PhD; Professor of Pediatrics and Neuroscience, & Psychology Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education; and Richard David Scott Chair, Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research, Boston Children’s Hospital

Experience is the engine that drives much of postnatal brain development. When children are deprived of key (i.e., experience-expected) experiences, particularly during critical periods of development, brain and behavioral development can be derailed. There is perhaps no more egregious form of deprivation than being raised in large, state-run institutions.

In my talk, I will introduce a project launched nearly 20 years ago, based in Bucharest, Romania. In the Bucharest Early Intervention Project three groups of Romanian children are being studied: infants abandoned to institutions and who remain in institutional care; infants abandoned to institutions but then placed in high quality foster care; and infants who have never been institutionalized. These three groups have been studied through age 16, with a 20 year follow up being planned. 

I will introduce the overall project, including its conceptual framework, its experimental design, the ethics involved in conducting this work and the nature of the intervention we deployed.  I will then briefly summarize findings from several key domains, including cognitive development, social-emotional development, psychopathology, brain development and stress physiology.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Dance Performance by First Year MFA Dance Candidates

Thu, May 2 2019 - 8:00pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Scott Gym Dance Studio, 102 Lower College Ln.

The Department of Dance presents the annual performance showcasing new solo work by first year MFA dance candidates: Xan Beurley, Alex Springer, and Toni Craige.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Wailing Banshees Spring Concert

Thu, May 2 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Earle Recital Hall, Sage Hall, 144 Green St.

Celebrate the end of classes with the Wailing Banshees. As always, jigs, reels, and the best craic on campus! Directed by Ellen Redman.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Universal Language and I Sing Earth Pt. 1

Repeats every day 2 times.
Wed, May 1 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Thu, May 2 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Hallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, 122 Green St.

The Smith College Department of Theatre presents studio productions of The Universal Language, a short one-act by David Ives, directed by Cathy Kennedy ‘20, and I Sing Earth Pt.1: Elephant's Tears, a play with music about the environment and our place in it by the Choreopoem Acting Class directed by Andrea Hairston and Pan Morigan. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Orchestra Spring Concert

Sat, Apr 27 2019 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Sweeney Concert Hall, Sage Hall, 144 Green St.

Jiayan Sun performs Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No.1 in B-flat Minor, Op. 23, paired with an exploration of Romeo and Juliet themes in Prokofiev’s Suite No.2 and in Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story. Jonathan Hirsh conducts.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

“As You Like It”

Repeats every day 3 times.
Thu, Apr 25 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Fri, Apr 26 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Sat, Apr 27 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Theatre 14, 122 Green St.

A girl named Rosalind is in love with a boy named Orlando, which is convenient because they’ve been banished to the same forest. Orlando is in love with Rosalind. Orlando is also very attracted to a boy named Ganymede. And what does it mean to be a girl or a boy anyway? Or to play one? Come to the Forest of Arden, and find answers for all your questions. Or questions for all your answers. Seating is general admission on risers on the stage. Fully accessible. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free for Smith Students. $5 Seniors and Students, $10 Adult.
Campus contact: 

Data Science Research Symposium 2019

Wed, Apr 24 2019 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 
Campus Center Auditorium
Data Science Research Symposium

The annual Data Science Research Symposium brings together data science researchers across industry and academia to showcase research collaborations, encourage technical exchange and professional networking, and facilitate new efforts to tackle emerging challenges. 

The morning plenary session will feature a keynote speaker, followed by short "lightning" talks by academic and industry researchers on a wide array of topics.

After an informal networking lunch, the afternoon "deep dive" sessions provide an opportunity to learn more about industry-relevant research areas.

The afternoon also features an Industry Meet and Greet session where company representatives can meet and talk with data science students about potential job and internship opportunities.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free admission
Campus contact: 

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