Education Studies Initiative Speaker Series Presents Derron Wallace: “Safe Routes to School? Black Caribbean Youth Negotiating Police Surveillance in London and New York City”

Mon, Feb 25 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Beneski Museum of Natural History, Paino Lecture Hall
Derron Wallace

This talk examines how Black Caribbean youth perceive and experience the state-endorsed ‘Stop and Search’ program in London and then-ongoing ‘Stop and Frisk’ practices in New York City while on route to and from public schools between 2007 and 2014. Despite a growing body of scholarship on the relationship between policing and schooling in the U.S. and U.K., comparative research on how school students experience stop and frisk/search practices remains sparse. Drawing on the BlackCrit tradition of Critical Race Theory and in-depth interviews with 60 black Caribbean secondary school students, this article explores how adolescents experience adult-like policing to and from schools. The findings indicate that participants develop a strained sense of belonging in British and American societies due to a security paradox—a policing formula that promises safety for all in principle, but does so at the expense of some black youth in practice. Participants learned that irrespective of ethnicity, black youth are regularly rendered suspicious subjects worthy of scrutiny, even during the school commute. This paper concludes with recommendations that can assist in improving students’ safety while en route to and from school.

Derron Wallace is an assistant professor of education and sociology at Brandeis University with joint affiliations in African and Afro-American Studies and Social Justice & Social Policy. He is a sociologist of race, ethnicity and education who specializes in cross-national studies of inequalities and identities in urban schools and neighborhoods, focusing specifically on the experiences of young people of African descent. His work has appeared in journals such as Sociology: The Journal of the British Sociological AssociationThe British Journal of Sociology of Education and Harvard Educational Review. His research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Gates Cambridge Trust, the Marion & Jasper Whiting Foundation and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. Prior to joining the Brandeis faculty, he served as a professional community organizer in London, working on youth safety, living wages, fair housing and immigrant rights campaigns.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

M@A Parallels Series Presents Nicole Mitchell: “Mandorla Awakening II”

Fri, Feb 22 2019 - 8:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Buckley Recital Hall
M@A Parallels Series Presents Nicole Mitchell: “Mandorla Awakening II”

With her Black Earth Ensemble, Mitchell uses science fiction to address the question: “What would a world look like that is truly egalitarian, with advanced technology that is in tune with nature?”

Tickets are required and are available at amherst.universitytickets.com or the Concert Office at (413) 542-2195.

Single ticket prices:
General Public: $18
Senior Citizens (65+) and Amherst College Employees: $12
Students, with valid ID: $10
AC student rush one hour before each concert: FREE

Recorded in May 2015 at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Mandorla features Mitchell's Black Earth Ensemble with new collaborators Tatsu Aoki (bass, shamisen, taiko) and Kojiro Umezaki (shakuhachi). Also in the mix is Chicago artist, scholar and poet Avery R. Young, who brings the composers’ lyrics to life with visceral humanity; and longtime collaborators Tomeka Reid (cello, banjo), Alex Wing (electric guitar, out, theremin), Renee Baker (violin) and Jovia Armstrong (percussion).

Mandorla Awakening II explores what Mitchell describes as a “collision of duality,” urban vs. country, hegemonic vs. vulnerable, acoustic vs. electric, with the dialogue of contrasting musical languages: Japanese, African-American gospel, R&B, jazz. The work chronicles the journey of a couple as they find themselves navigating between two civilizations: the World Union, a crumbling society rampant with disease and inequality, and Mandorla, a utopia where spirituality, technology and nature coexist harmoniously. Mandorla Awakening was included among the top 10 jazz albums for 2017 by The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, NPR and Wire (UK).

Nicole M. Mitchell is an award-winning creative flutist, composer, bandleader and educator. She is perhaps best known for her work as a flutist, having developed a unique improvisational language and having repeatedly been named “Top Flutist of the Year” by DownBeat magazine's critics poll and the Jazz Journalists Association (2010–17). Mitchell initially emerged from Chicago’s innovative music scene in the late ’90s, and her music celebrates contemporary African-American culture.

“One of the most exciting jazz soloists and composers in the world” –Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Tickets are required and are available at amherst.universitytickets.com or the Concert Office at (413) 542-2195.
Event contact: 
Amherst College Concert Office
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-2195
Contact email: 
concerts@amherst.edu
Campus contact: 

German Film Series: "Mahler auf der Couch"

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 4:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum
Mahler Auf Der Couch

"Mahler auf der Couch" will be screened at both 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and will be shown in German with English subtitles. Please contact Megan Howes for more information.

Synopsis: Experimental drama that imaginatively reconstructs a real encounter between two giants of fin-de-siècle Viennese culture: in the summer of 1910, composer Gustav Mahler traveled to Leyden in the Netherlands, to seek help with his troubled marriage to Alma – from none other than Sigmund Freud.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

"Change of the Guard": A Talk by Jazz Critic Nate Chinen

Thu, Feb 21 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry
Nate Chinen

The story of jazz has often been upheld in terms of cultural triumph, as a transcendent response to African-American struggle. Jazz is also presented as a story of succession, a chain of creative genius passing from one "Great Man" to the next. These are persuasive frameworks that define the artform by a canon and a fixed set of values, inscribing a kind of perimeter.

In this multimedia presentation, which draws from the first chapter of Playing Changes: Jazz For the New Century(Pantheon, 2018), Chinen will address the rise of a conservation agenda in the jazz culture of the 1970s and '80s, and the stubbornly powerful trope of a jazz messiah, which now exists in a different form.

Nate Chinen was born in Honolulu, to a musical family: he grew up around the local Musicians Union, as his parents were popular nightclub entertainers. He began writing about jazz in 1996 for the Philadelphia City Paper, and has now authored content for several national music publications, including DownBeatBlender and Vibe. Chinen spent about 12 years working as a jazz and pop critic for The New York Times and wrote monthly columns for JazzTimes. He is a 10-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing, presented by the Jazz Journalists Association. The same organization presented him with its award for Best Book About Jazz, for his work on Myself Among Others, the autobiography of impresario George Wein. Chinen is currently working as director of editorial content at WBGO, while still closely engaging with programs like Jazz Night in AmericaThe Checkout and a range of jazz programming on NPR.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Music, the Corliss Lamont Lectureship for a Peaceful World and the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series at Amherst. This event is free and open to the public.

For more music department events, see our department calendar at https://www.amherst.edu/academiclife/departments/music/events.

Photo by Michael Lionstar

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Artist Talk with Stephen Vitiello

Wed, Feb 20 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum
Stephen Vitiello

"Listening, Hearing and the Human" is a course taught by Associate Professor of Music Jeffers Engelhardt and Associate Professor of Music Darryl Harper, that asks us to think about listening and hearing as culturally specific practices that are guided by particular histories, identities, technologies and other factors. All are invited to a talk by sound artist Stephen Vitiello, followed by a discussion led by Professors Engelhardt and Harper. This program is made possible with support from Amherst College Departments of Anthropology and Sociology and Music as well as Arts at Amherst.

This event is free and open to all.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Russian Film Screening: I Am Dragon (ОН-ДРАКОН)

Thu, Feb 14 2019 - 4:30pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)
I Am Dragon

The Department of Russian presents I Am Dragon (ОН-ДРАКОН), a 2015 film directed by Indar Dzhendubaev.

Synopsis: During her wedding ceremony, Princess Mira is snatched by a dragon and is carried away to its lair on a remote island where rescue is impossible. The princess is unharmed and has nothing but a stone cage and a mysterious young man named Arman who finds her food and drink but keeps his distance from her. Who is he, and what's he doing on the island? Is he also the dragon's prisoner?

The movie is in Russian with English subtitles and will be screened at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The runtime is 110 minutes.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

M@A Chamber Series Presents Mnozil Brass: "Cirque"

Sun, Feb 10 2019 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Buckley Recital Hall
Mnozil Brass, Cirque

This septet from Vienna is probably the strangest brass ensemble you will ever hear. With a musical virtuosity mixed with their own special kind of comedy, they really have to be seen to be believed.

Tickets go on sale two weeks before each performance. Evening box office opens one hour prior to the concert. Free Amherst student rush tickets are available on the night of the performance.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Chamber Series: General public: $28 Senior citizens (65+) and Amherst College employees: $22 Students, with valid ID: $12 Amherst student rush tickets on the night of the performance: FREE
Campus contact: 

"Footnotes: Reflections on the Research Process" with Professor Sara Brenneis

Thu, Feb 7 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:45pm
Location: 
Frost Library, 2nd Floor
Sara Brenneis

Join us for a conversation with Associate Professor of Spanish Sara Brenneis about her new book, Spaniards in Mauthausen: Representations of a Nazi Concentration Camp, 1940-2015. In this book, Brenneis provides a historical, critical and chronological analysis of a virtually unknown body of work by examining narratives about Spanish Mauthausen victims over the past 70 years. Leah Kim '19 will interview Professor Brenneis about the project and her approaches to the research process. Coffee & tea will be provided.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

"Hawks, Doves and Arms Control" - Talk by Sarah Kreps

Thu, Feb 7 2019 - 10:45am to 3:00pm
Location: 
Science Center, E108
Sarah Kreps

The Political Science Department, along with funding from the Stanton Foundation, welcomes Sarah Kreps to present "Hawks, Doves and Arms Control."

Does it really take a Nixon to go to China, as pundits often claim? Does it take a Trump to get Russia to reduce their production of nuclear weapons? Sarah Kreps will explore these timely questions. Challenging common wisdom, Kreps will discuss when and why leaders with a reputation for preferring peace to war (so called “dovish leaders”) can overcome disadvantages at the negotiating table.

Sarah Kreps is a professor of government and adjunct professor of law at Cornell University. In
2017-2018, she was an adjunct scholar at the Modern War Institute at West Point. She is also a Faculty
Fellow in the Milstein Program in Technology and Humanity at the Cornell Tech Campus in New York
City. Kreps is the author of four books, including, most recently, Taxing Wars: The American Way
of War Finance and the Decline of Democracy
.

This event is free and open to the public.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

This Bystander with Cold, Clear Eyes: Meta-theater in The Peach Blossom Fan

Wed, Feb 6 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Fayerweather Hall, 113

Allison Bernard of Columbia University will give a talk titled "This Bystander with Cold, Clear Eyes: Meta-theater in The Peach Blossom Fan."

Summary by Allison Bernard: This talk addresses the uses of meta-theater in The Peach Blossom Fan (Taohua shan), a historical drama completed in 1699 by the Chinese playwright Kong Shangren. I argue that meta-theater — how the play calls attention to itself as a work of theater — becomes a way for The Peach Blossom Fan to critique the historical and dramatic contexts out of which it arises. Historically, the play uses meta-theatrical techniques to evaluate the problems of China’s turbulent 17th century, which for many period writers felt unmoored and even a bit surreal. Dramatically, the play uses meta-theater to question and complicate standard generic conventions, such as the classification of characters by “role-type” and the expected happy ending. In this talk, I focus on one case study that unites these historical and dramatic aspects of The Peach Blossom Fan’s meta-theatrical method: the stage character of Ruan Dacheng, a 17th century politician who was also a popular playwright.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible

Pages