"Making It (Work)": A Candid Conversation with June Gehringer on the Realities of Life for Emerging LGBT+ Artists

Tue, Apr 9 2019 - 10:00am
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, New York Room
 June Gehringer

Speaking from her experience as a trans woman of color, June Gehringer will share reflections on working in literature and especially in indie lit. In this interactive session, she will share the skills she has learned along the way, specifically in terms of communication, self-promotion, self-care and staying organized.

Born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, June Gehringer is a poet, essayist and activist currently based in Philadelphia. She is the author of two full-length collections of poetry, the most recent of which, “I Don’t Write About Race” (Civil Coping Mechanisms 2018), was the winner of Civil Coping Mechanisms’s 2017 Mainline Competition, was named an Entropy Best Poetry Book of 2018, and debuted as the #1 New Release in LGBT Books on Amazon. She co-founded Tenderness Lit, a small press dedicated to celebrating innovative and under-appreciated LGBT lit, and currently serves as an editor at the Wanderer. She can be found running her mouth on Twitter @June_Gehringer.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

“Women, Money, Death and Patriarchy: The Kenyan Experience”

Mon, Apr 8 2019 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Five College Women's Studies Research Center, Seminar Room

Public Lecture by Mary Njeri Kinyanjui, FCWSRC Research Associate and Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi.

Sharon Otieno was a second-year student at Rongo University in Kenya. She was raped, brutally murdered, and left in a bush in Uriri, Migori County, on September 3, 2018. Okoth Obado, her rich boyfriend and governor of Migori County, was arrested and accused of the murder. Sharon was thought to be involved in a phenomenon locally known as "sponsorship," where rich men sponsor young girls‘ expensive lifestyles.Sharon‘s story provoked Kinyanjui to interrogate the issue of women, money, death and patriarchy in Kenya in the context of women's financial uncertainty. Kenyan women are excluded from global financial circuits and have been struggling to earn money in difficult and dangerous terrains. This is a contradiction to the lived experiences of girls in sponsored relationships where beauty, youth and sex play a role in accessing money. In this talk, Kinyanjui will trace the reality of Kenyan women's financial precarity from its introduction during the colonial time to present day Kenya.Kinyanjui will aim to answer the following questions:
  • How were women incorporated into the global money culture?
  • What were the women‘s reactions to the introduction of money?
  • What are the emergent male-female relationships in relation to money?
  • How has money affected women's lives? Feminists' lives? 
Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Dr. Ayça Çubukçu — "For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq"

Mon, Apr 8 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, New York Room
 Dr. Ayça Çubukçu

The Mary E. Johnson Lecture this year will be given by Ayça Çubukçu, who will discuss her book "For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq."

The global anti-war movement against the invasion and occupation of Iraq crystalized on February 15, 2003, when millions of people simultaneously demonstrated in 600 cities around the world. The World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) emerged from this global anti-war movement "to tell and disseminate the truth about the Iraq War." Between 2003 and 2005, in the absence of official institutions of justice willing or able to perform the task, the WTI established a globally networked platform where the reasons and consequences of the war could be investigated, and those responsible for the destruction of Iraq could be publicly judged. Based on two years of fieldwork with WTI activists around the globe, this talk will examine the transnational praxis of the World Tribunal on Iraq to address challenges of forging global solidarity through an anti-imperialist politics of human rights and international law.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Amherst Symphony Orchestra Presents "Carmen" with the Amherst College Choral Society

Fri, Apr 12 2019 - 8:00pm
Location: 
Buckley Recital Hall

The Amherst Symphony Orchestra presents a semi-staged performance of Georges Bizet's tragic masterpiece, the opera Carmen. It will be performed in a condensed, two-act, two-hour production in French with supertitles.

Visiting professional guest artists for Carmen include Olga Perez Flora in the title role, James Flora as Don José, Danielle Pastin as Micaela and Brian Hupp as Escamillo. The Amherst College Choral Society, directed by Arianne Abela, joins the cast and orchestra for this performance.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Tickets at the door: $10 general admission, $5 seniors, children and students with ID. This event is free for Five College students.
Campus contact: 

Women Veterans At War - A Panel Discussion

Thu, Apr 11 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Stirn Auditorium, Mead Art Museum
Women Veterans at War

Join us for a panel discussion with two women veterans who have led in their military and civilian careers: former Marine Corps officer Kate Germano and former Army linguist Kayla Williams. The discussion will be moderated by CBS This Morning: Saturday co-host and NCAA Tournament sidelines reporter Dana Jacobson. The panelists will explain what it has been like to serve while the United States has been at war, the particular challenges impacting women servicemembers and veterans and the impact of policy changes such as the end of the ground combat exclusion policy.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Politics of Research: From Fortress to Intimacy

Wed, Apr 10 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall, room A011
Paulo Ravecca

Paulo Ravecca will give a talk titled “ The Politics of Research: From Fortress to Intimacy". Paulo Ravecca is assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the Universidad de la República, Uruguay, where he researches epistemology and the history of political science, critical theories (queer, neo-marxist, postcolonial, and poststructural approaches), political economy and international relations, and gender and sexuality. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Narrative Politics and Crítica Contemporánea. Revista de Teoría Política.

This event is being sponsored by The Political Science Department of Amherst College along with funding support from the Lamont Fund and the Lurcy Endowment.

This event is free and open to the public.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

"Math for Real Life: The Role of Quantitative Skills in Educating the Next Generation of Voters, Consumers, and Citizens"

Wed, Apr 10 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Science Center, Lipton Lecture Hall

Join us for this year's Lazerowitz Lecture with Kate Follette, assistant professor of astronomy. Professor Follette will discuss the critical role that quantitative reasoning plays in educating savvy consumers, discerning voters, and conscientious citizens, focusing on recent results that can inform pedagogical practice across the curriculum.

Reception to follow!

This event is made possible by the Max and Etta Lazerowitz Lectureship Fund.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Stories From the Front Lines: Indigenous Environmental Justice and Human Rights Violations Under the Duterte Regime

Mon, Apr 8 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Frost Library, CHI Seminar Room
Stories From the Front Lines: Indigenous Environmental Justice and Human Rights Violations Under the Duterte Regime

Guest Speaker Cristina Rey (2019E) will give a history of indigenous resistance in the Philippines and share first-hand updates on the current conditions of indigenous peoples in Mindanao who are being harassed, bombed, raped and murdered by Philippine military forces in response to their resistance to multinational mining corporations and other extractive industries. In addition, she will discuss one of the primary expressions of indigenous self-determination in Mindanao today: alternative community schools whose three basic pillars are academics, sustainable and organic agriculture, and holistic health. Her experiences in the Philippines can help shine light on the inside of the media blackout for those of us outside of its bubble.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Event contact: 
Joseph Centeno
Contact phone: 
(215) 519-8818
Contact email: 
jcenteno22@amherst.edu
Campus contact: 

Bach Festival Faculty Concert: Gilles Vonsattel, Piano

Fri, Apr 12 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Fine Arts Center Bezanson Recital Hall
Gilles Vonsattel

The Departmet of Music and Dance presents a Faculty Concert by Gilles Vonsattel, piano, in conjunction with the Bach Festival and Symposium.

The program will feature J.S. Bach: Prelude in C major, BWV 846 from The Well-Tempered Clavier, J.S. Bach: 3 Counterpoints from Art of Fugue, BWV 1080, Mendelssohn: Variations Sérieuses, Op. 54, Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in A major, No. 7, Op. 87, and Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Event contact: 
Music & Dance Dept.
Contact phone: 
413-577-2154
Contact email: 
music@music.umass.edu
Campus contact: 

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