Five College Consortium

Global Salon with Bassam Khabieh

Mon, Nov 26 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Lewis Global Studies Center Lounge & Library-Wright 127 & 128

Documenting the Syrian Human Rights Crisis: A Conversation with Photographer Bassam Khabieh

Syrian freelance photographer Bassam Khabieh, winner of the Robert Capa Gold Medal for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise,” will present his photographs and talk about documenting the war and the human rights crisis in Syria.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Smith Wind Ensemble

Mon, Nov 19 2018 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Sweeney Concert Hall

Ellen Redman, music director. Classics Old & New: The Wind Ensemble explores music that defines the genre. Works by composers such as Holst, Vaughan Williams and William Schuman alongside the contemporary voices of John Mackey, Frank Ticheli and Brian Balmages.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Global Salon with Lori Tharps '94

Mon, Nov 19 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Lewis Global Studies Center Lounge & Library-Wright 127 & 128

"Kinky Gazpacho: Life, Love & Spain."

Lori L. Tharps '94, associate professor of journalism, Temple University, will share her experience as a Smith student spending her junior year in Spain in search of her authentic self. Tharps will discuss what she found in Spain – from romance to racism – and how that adventure literally changed her life.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

The Color of Tomorrow: Community in the Age of Resistance and Trump

Tue, Dec 4 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
227 Herter Hall

On December 4, 2018, Rich Benjamin, a writer for The New Yorker on African-American issues and author of SEARCHING FOR WHITOPIA, will be visiting the MFA for Poets and Writers and will also address the general UMass population.

 

Rich Benjamin is the author of Searching for Whitopia: An Improbable Journey to the Heart of White America (Hachette Books), selected as an Editor’s Choice by Booklist and The American Library Association. Now in its second printing, this study is one of few to have illuminated in advance the social-political forces propelling the political rise of Donald Trump.

 

Having earned his doctorate in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University, Benjamin is a cultural translator: He aims to translate complex research in a distinct voice for general audiences and to translate ideas and cultural competencies across different nationalities, ranks, social backgrounds, and academic disciplines. As such, his work appears regularly in debate, including in The New York Times, The Guardian, The New Yorker, The New York Times Sunday Book Review and NPR. Benjamin has taught writing and/or the interdisciplinary humanities at Stanford University and Miami University of Ohio.

 

Benjamin’s literary citizenship includes serving as a Juror for the PEN Center’s John Kenneth Galbraith Book Award for Nonfiction in 2017. He also serves as a Board Member of the Authors Guild, the largest, oldest union of writers in the US that has been protecting authors’ creative interests and free speech since 1912.

 

This event is sponsored by the MFA for Poets and Writers, the UMass Amherst English Department, the W.E.B. Du Bois Library's Special Collections, and the Office of Equity and Inclusion.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Eileen Myles Reading

Thu, Dec 6 2018 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Art Building, Gamble Auditorium B

“It seems you should obviously always be pleasing somebody with your writing but who.” Eileen MYLES

Eileen Myles is a poet, novelist, public talker and art journalist. Their twenty-one books include evolution (poems), Afterglow (a dog memoir), a 2017 re-issue of Cool for You, I Must Be Living Twice/new and selected poems, and Chelsea Girls. Eileen is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an Andy Warhol/Creative Capital Arts Writers grant, four Lambda Book Awards, and the Shelley Prize from the PSA. In 2016, Myles received a Creative Capital grant and the Clark Prize for excellence in art writing. In 2019 they'll be teaching at NYU and Naropa University and they live in New York and Marfa, TX. 

Free and open to the public. 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Lecture by Sylvia Chan-Malik: Being Muslim: A Cultural History of Women of Color in American Islam

Thu, Dec 6 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Art Building, Gamble Auditorium
Sylvia Chan-Malik (Rutgers University) will give a lecture based on her recently published book, Being Muslim: A Cultural History of American Islam. 
In her lecture, Professor Chan-Malik will discuss the ways U.S. Muslim women’s identities are expressions of Islam as both Black protest religion and universal faith tradition. Drawing on archival images, cultural texts, popular media, and interviews, she will show how communities of American Islam became sites of safety, support, spirituality, and social activism, and how women of color were central to their formation. By accounting for American Islam’s rich histories of mobilization and community, her book Being Muslim brings insight to the resistance that all Muslim women must engage in the post-9/11 United States. 

From the stories that she gathers, Professor Chan-Malik demonstrates the diversity and similarities of Black, Arab, South Asian, Latina, and multiracial Muslim women, and how American understandings of Islam have shifted against the evolution of U.S. white nationalism over the past century. In borrowing from the lineages of Black and women-of-color feminism, Chan-Malik offers us a new vocabulary for U.S. Muslim feminism, one that is as conscious of race, gender, sexuality, and nation, as it is region and religion.

 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Vespers

Sun, Dec 2 2018 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Abbey Chapel

The Mount Holyoke College Choral Ensembles and the Chamber Jazz, Vocal Jazz and English Handbell ensembles will once again present their annual holiday-inspired performances, best known for the candlelight procession and carol singing. The theme this year is "On a Winter's Night," and musical selections include images of stars, dreams, memories, and the magic and wonder of the season.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Latina/o Conference/Symposium

Thu, Nov 29 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, New York Room

In the Heights/In Holyoke: A Latina/o Cultural Symposium sponsored by Mount Holyoke College's Office of the Dean of Faculty, the Weissman Center for Leadership, the Spanish/Latina/o and Latin American Studies Department, La Unidad, MEcha and Holyoke Community College: One Community Holyoke

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free event
Campus contact: 

Amherst College Symphony Orchestra: ¡Cuba y Brasil!

Sun, Dec 9 2018 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Arms Music Center, Buckley Recital Hall

Program
Tania León: Alegre (Cheerful) and La indígena (Indigenous)
Heitor Villa-Lobos: Bachianas Brasilieras #5
Zequinha de Abre: Tico Tico
George Gershwin: Cuban Overture
Traditional Cuban folk song: La Paloma 

Traditional Afro-Cuban and agricultural worker Guajiro styles first incorporated in art music of Roldan and Caturla find their modern-day expression in the work of Cuban-born composer Tania León (b. 1943). The orchestra performs León’s boisterous and jazzy Alegre (Cheerful) as well as the chamber work La Indígena (Indigenous), a collage of melodic memories evoking the sonic environment of León's childhood in Havana. 

Sandwiched between Cuban repertoires is the ravishing Bachianas Brasilieras #5 (1942/1945) for solo soprano and eight cellos, from a suite of nine works by the Brazilian master Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887-1959) as well as the whirlwind showpiece Tico Tico by Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935).
The concert closes with Cuban Overture (1932) by the American master George Gershwin (1900-1937), a giant rumba that draws on popular hits Gershwin absorbed during a vacation in Havana in 1932, followed by the traditional Cuban folk song La Paloma.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Tickets may be purchased only at the door. Prices are $10 for the general public; $5 for senior citizens, students with ID and children under 12, and are free to Amherst and all Five College students with ID.
Campus contact: 

Pages