Five College Consortium

Sightlines Tour: Shaping the World: The Art of Architecture

Sat, Feb 3 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:15pm
Location: 
Art Museum, Art Museum Exhibit Hall

On this tour, led by Serena McDonald-Newman ’20, Student Guide, visitors will consider how architecture can shape our everyday experiences. Architecture does not only provide a place to live, eat, and work, it has more subtle functions as well. It can manipulate our understanding of the truth, instill values, and promote ideals. We will look at all of these ideas and more in a journey that incorporates art from first-century Italy to nineteenth-century New England.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
mfinnega@mtholyoke.edu

Branko Milanovic: "Global Inequality: Causes and Socio-political Implications"

Thu, Feb 8 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Art Museum, 106AB

Branko Milanovic, City University of New York, and world-renowned scholar on income inequality, speaks on "Global Inequality: Causes and Socio-political Implications."

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
jmedina@mtholyoke.edu

Play Reading of Chay Yew's Question 27, Question 28

Fri, Feb 9 2018 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Rooke Theatre, Rooke

Directed by Heidi Holder, this reading weaves a story of the struggles, plights and courage of Japanese American female detainees in the American internment camps of World War II.

Free and open to the public. 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
bbunyan@mtholyoke.edu

Staged reading of Chay Yew's "Question 27, Question 28

Fri, Feb 9 2018 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Rooke Theatre, Rooke Theatre

 What happened to the women of the Japanese American internment?  How did these brave women keep their American dream alive?  This play weaves a story of the struggles, plights and courage of Japanese American female detainees in the American internment camps of World War II

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
bbunyan@mtholyoke.edu

Gallery Talk: Portraits of Mary Woolley

Thu, Feb 15 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Art Museum, Art Museum Exhibit Hall

This talk, led by Katia Kiefaber ’17, Art Museum Advisory Board Curatorial Fellowfeatures two portraits of Mary Woolley commissioned by the Mount Holyoke Classes of 1909 and 1931. They capture different moments in Woolley’s tenure at the College and spark a dialogue about the gendered perspectives of both the sitter and the artists.

 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
mfinnega@mtholyoke.edu

China Night 2018

Fri, Feb 16 2018 - 5:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, Chapin Auditorium

Chinese New Year is coming! Amazing dancing and singing performances, live sand painting, Chinese Kungfu and music ensemble with best Chinese food! 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with AccessAbility Services office on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
$6 show only; $10 dinner and show

2018 Hastorf Lecture

Thu, Feb 8 2018 - 4:15pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Clapp Laboratory, Hooker Auditorium

2018 Hastorf Lecture

Sponsored by Barbara and Albert Hastorf

The Significance of Gut Bacteria: Microbiome-nervous system interactions in health and disease

Elaine Y. Hsiao, University of California, Los Angeles

Thursday, February 8th, 4:15 pm
Hooker Auditorium, Mount Holyoke College

The gut microbiota is emerging as an important modulator of brain function and behavior. Recent discoveries reveal substantial effects of the intestinal flora on neurophysiology, neurogenesis, blood brain barrier permeability, neuroimmunity, brain gene expression and animal behavior. To better understand these emergent findings, my lab and others are mining human intestinal flora to further investigate the impact of the microbiota-immune system interactions on neurodevelopment, and examine the interface between gene-environment interactions in neurological diseases. 

Elaine Y. Hsiao is an emerging leader in the field of gut-brain connections. Her research explores how microbe-nervous system interactions impact mental health and brain development, with a focus on identifying ways to modify the microbiota to treat symptoms of neuropsychiatric diseases. In 2014 Dr. Hsaio was recognized by Forbes 30 under 30 as an innovator in Health and Science. Her work has been featured in top tier journals including Cell, Nature Neuroscience, and Biological Psychiatry. More recently, Dr. Hsiao was named one of 2015’s Emerging Explorers by National Geographic and she was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

 Free and open to the public  ■  Refreshments will be served For more information call 413-538-2338 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact email: 
jcrosby@mtholyoke.edu

Maya Joshi lecture

Tue, Feb 27 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 201
Stretching Space, Keeping Time: The Explorative Abundance of Rahul Sankrityayan

This talk traces the life and work of Rahul Sankrityayan, 1893-1963, a fascinating polymath born in India who left behind a multi-disciplinary legacy of works, largely in Hindi, though he worked with languages as diverse as Tibetan and Tajik, Sanskrit and Bhojpuri. His largely autodidactic trajectory, inspired by innate wanderlust, buttressed by philosophical conviction, enlivened by extraordinary linguistic abilities, and charged by urgent activist concern, cuts across the domains of politics, philosophy, history, and literature. He concerns himself with nothing less than the past, present, and future of India and the world. Buddhism and Marxism are the lode stars for this exploration. While his remarkable life tempts one to a reading of it as irreducibly unique, my attempt is to locate it within a larger intellectual and political milieu.

Maya Joshi is Associate Professor in English at Lady Shri Ram College, University of Delhi. She is currently Fulbright Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, working towards an intellectual biography of Rahul Sankrityayan. She has worked closely with Tibet House, Delhi over the years, has published on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, aspects of Buddhism in India today, and on different aspects of Rahul Sankrityayan, especially his engagements with Buddhism and Marxism.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

David Daley: Gerrymandering

Tue, Feb 27 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 106

David Daley, senior fellow for FairVote and author of "Ratf**ked:  The True Story Behind the Secret Plan to Steal America's Democracy." will discuss "Gerrymandering--How Politicians Elect Their Voters."  Daley is a frequent lecturer and media source about gerrymandering.  A former editor-in-chief of Salon.com and the former CEO and publisher of the Connecticut News Project, his work has appeared in New York Magazine, the Atlantic, the Boston Globe, the New Yorker, the Washington Post, and USA Today.  When writing for the Hartford Courant, he helped identify Mark Felt as the "Deep Throat" source for Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

Poetry Reading by Red Pine

Mon, Feb 26 2018 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Poetry Center (prev. Wright CRM)

Red Pine (Bill Porter) was born in Los Angeles in 1943 and attended graduate school at Columbia University. An acclaimed translator, his published works include three major Buddhist texts: The Platform Sutra, The Diamond Sutra, and The Heart Sutra. He is also the author of Zen Baggage, Road to Heaven: Encounters with Chinese Hermits. Red Pine has lived in Taiwan and Hong Kong, and has traveled extensively in China, visiting Zen temples and seeking out hermits. He lives in Port Townsend, Washington.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Disability Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

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