"Architecture and Race," with Mabel O. Wilson (Architecture, Columbia University)

Thu, Mar 30 2017 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
R.W. Kern Center 202

Sponsored by the Questioning Aesthetics Symposium: Black Aesthetics, organized by Michael Kelly and Monique Roelofs

For suggested readings in preparation for the workshop, please see under the link to Mabel O. Wilson at
blackaesthetics.hampshire.edu and transaestheticsfoundation.org

contacts: Monique Roelofs

For practical information please contact Tripp Johnson

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Not accessible
Event contact: 
Tripp Johnson
Contact email: 
wgjHA@hampshire.edu
Campus contact: 

Ethnomusicology Certificate Celebration

Sun, Apr 9 2017 - 3:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Alumni House

Presentations by 6 Five College students receiving the Five College Certificate in Ethnomusicology as well as a keynote address by Dr. Christine Yano, Professor and Chair of Anthropology at the University of Hawaii on "Cover Up: Mixed-Race Performance on the Japanese Stage."  All welcome. Reception to Follow.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Power to the People Workshop

Fri, Mar 24 2017 - 6:15pm to 7:15pm
Location: 
Kirby Memorial Theater

This workshop explores the performative possibilities of the Greek Chorus using music from different parts of Africa, and is led by Chief Baba Neil Clarke and stage director Yagil Eliraz.

The workshop is open to viewers, but participation is only for students and professionals with performance experience.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public for viewing, but only professionals and experienced performers may participate.
Campus contact: 

"Dancing in the Light" Film Screening

Wed, Mar 22 2017 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

A film screening of the American Dance Festival's Dancing in the Light: Six Dances by African-American Choreographers.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

The Five College Annual Lecture in Late Antiquity: "After Atilla, Rethinking Steppe Nomads in Roman Late Antiquity"

Wed, Mar 22 2017 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

Michael Maas will discuss "After Atilla: Rethinking Steppe Nomads in Roman Late Antiquity."

Maas is the William Gaines Twyman Professor of History at Rice University, where he is the director of the B.A. Program in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations. Last year, he was director in Byzantine studies at Dumbarton Oaks Research Center and Library. Maas publishes in the field of Late Antiquity. His most recent book, The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila, appeared in 2015. Currently in production with Cambridge University Press is a co-edited (with Nicola Di Cosmo) volume titled Empires and Exchanges in Eurasian Late Antiquity. He is completing a book about late antique ethnography.

This event is presented by the Five College Faculty Seminar in Late Antiquity and sponsored by Five Colleges, Inc., the Amherst College Department of Religion, the University of Massachusetts Department of History, the Mount Holyoke College Department of Religion, the Smith College Department of History and Smith College Classical Languages and Literatures.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

"Call to Action: Leveraging the Power of Diversity to Achieve Academic Excellence" Talk by Robert Teranishi

Tue, Mar 21 2017 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

Robert Teranishi will discuss "Call to Action: Leveraging the Power of Diversity to Achieve Academic Excellence."

Teranishi is a professor of social science and comparative education; the Morgan and Helen Chu Endowed Chair in Asian American Studies; and co-director for the Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also a senior fellow with the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy at New York University and principal investigator for the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education. His research examines the causes and consequences of the stratification of college opportunities, with a particular interest on the impact of higher education practice and policy on the mobility of marginalized and vulnerable communities.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

Global Deportation - The Rise of a Dangerous New Phenomenon

Wed, Mar 22 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Old Chapel Great Hall

Daniel Kanstroom, professor of law, Thomas F. Carney Distinguished Scholar at Boston College, and associate director of the Boston College Center for Human Rights and International Justice, will speak on "Global Deportation: The Rise of a Dangerous New Phenomenon".

Kanstroom, the 2016-17 Interdisciplinary Studies Institute (ISI) resident, will be on campus March 21-24 as part of their 2016-17 theme, "Trespassing." [4] In addition to his lecture, he will engage with faculty, graduate students, and the local community.

This public ISI lecture takes place in collaboration with the College of Social & Behavioral Science series, "Social Science Matters: Perspectives on Migration."

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

Brazilian Portugays: Pajuba' and LGBT Language and Culture in Brazil

Fri, Mar 24 2017 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Lewis Global Studies Center, Wright Hall
Steven Butterman is Associate Professor and Director of the Portuguese Language Program at the U. of Miami. He is author of Perversions on Parade: Brazilian Literature of Transgression and Postmodern Anti-Aesthetics in Glauco Mattoso (2005) and has published widely articles on Brazilian film, poetry, music, and LGBTQ culture.
Dr. Butterman will discuss a chapter from his forthcoming book, “Brazilian Portugays: LGBT Language and Culture in Contemporary Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo,” focusing on ways minority sexualities are addressed in the reference genre, including the first “gayspeak” dictionaries published in Brazil. He will also address roles, influences, and social dynamics in Brazilian LGBT language of Bajubá (or Pajubá), a Yoruba-Bantu-Portuguese creole sociolect originally associated with Afro-Brazilian religious practices and adopted as a secret language among Bahia’s transgender/travesti community.
Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Campus contact: 

Career Networking Event

Thu, Mar 23 2017 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Cape Cod Lounge of the Student Union

The program will begin at a 6 PM; please arrive at 5:45 PM for a brief orientation. Once everyone is situated, there will be a short introduction and then several rounds of networking each lasting 20 minutes, where you can talk with them about the transition from student life to the working world . This event is sponsored by the IT Program and UMass Career Services.

We also welcome you to attend the IT program’s annual ICT summit on March 24.
The summit includes a tech fair featuring a wealth of 3D Printing and other IT equipment from the corporate world, and demonstrations of technologies used in a wide range of 5 College research and education projects; as well as a slate of talks on the role of technology in academia and society today.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Re-Imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-Cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy

Thu, Mar 23 2017 (All day) to Sat, Mar 25 2017 (All day)
Location: 
Kirby Theater

The Theater and Dance Department at Amherst College will host a three-day international conference, Re-imagining the Greeks: Contemporary and Cross-cultural Approaches to Greek Tragedy, in Holden Theater March 23-25, 2017.

Each day will be devoted to a different region/culture around the world, and its cross-cultural approach to plays from ancient Greece. The first day will be about Japanese adaptations, the second about Black interpretations (African and American), and the third about American adaptations. The conference will combine scholarly discussions, workshops based on non-western performative approaches, and live performances.

“In the past few decades, we have witnessed a worldwide trend of adapting and re-imagining ancient Greek plays,” says Yagil Eliraz, organizer of the conference. “These cross-cultural approaches prove that Greek tragedy is a universal resource, and not the exclusive property and cradle of the West. The conference will offer the opportunity to focus on the performative aspects of these contemporary adaptations, and will bring together scholars and practitioners from various disciplines.”

Conference highlights

March 23, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Japanese adaptations. Discussion: Mae Smethurst from the University of Pittsburgh will lead a discussion about the works of Tadashi Suzuki, Yukio Ninagawa and Miyagi Satoshi. She will be accompanied by director Izumi Ashizawa. Workshop: Experiment with Greek texts using Butoh.

March 23, 9 p.m. Performance: the performer Yokko will present her dance-theater solo piece, “Butoh Medea,” a new adaptation of Medea.

March 24, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Black Interpretations

Discussion and staged reading: Astrid van Weyenberg from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands will lead a discussion about political change as reflected in South African and Nigerian adaptations of Antigone and the myth of House of Atreus. Weyenberg will be joined by scholar and Percussionist Neil Clarke, who will talk about social functions of African drumming. Actors will read scenes from Molora (Yael Farber), Tegonni (Femi Ososfisan), and The Darker Face of The Earth (Rita Dove). Workshop: experiment with Greek texts using live African drumming.

March 24, 9:00 p.m. Screening: Chi-Raq (2015), directed by Spike Lee. adaptation of "Lysistrata", a comedy by Aristophanes, set against the backdrop of gang violence in Chicago.

March 25, 10.30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Book Launch: George Rodosthenous from the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom will launch his new book, Contemporary Adaptations of Greek Tragedy: Auteurship and Directorial Visions.

March 25, 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American interpretations

Discussion: Helene Foley from Columbia University will lead a discussion about the representations of war in American adaptations. Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics Sarah Olsen will discuss dance in ancient Greek tragedies. Workshop: stage director and Visiting Assistant Professor Yagil Eliraz will explore The Persians live music. 

March 25, 9 p.m. Screening: La Medea: a musical re-imagining of Euripides’ violent tragedy into a dance-theater performance and feature film á la Latin-disco-pop variety show. Conceived and directed by Yara Travieso.

The conference is funded by the Office of the Dean of the Faculty and the Arts at Amherst Initiative, with additional support from related academic departments. The conference will be part of the Arts at Amherst Spring Festival events.

All conference events are open to the general public, free of charge. Registration is recommended, at www.amherst.edu/go/reimaginingthegreeks . Performers (students and professionals) who wish to take part in the workshops must register in advance, due to limited capacity.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public
Campus contact: 

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