Film screening: The River and the Wall (2019)

Wed, Feb 19 2020 - 5:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Old Chapel Room: 2nd Floor
The River and the Wall

The migration film & facilitation series is a collaboration between the institute of diversity sciences, the migration studies working group, and the center for teaching and learning and is funded by a Campus Climate Improvement Grant. Our aim is to bring together staff, faculty, and students and people from a variety of perspectives to watch films about migration and to create a space for an open and respectful facilitated discussion on one of the most hotly-debated topics of our times – migrants.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free admission
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"Improvising Across Abilities: Pauline Oliveros and the Adaptive-Use Musical Instrument": A Talk by Professor Sherrie Tucker (University of Kansas)

Fri, Feb 21 2020 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Arms Music Center, 3
Sherrie Tucker

The music department presents a special talk by jazz historian and professor of American studies Sherrie Tucker. All are invited.

Professor Tucker’s talk focuses on the work of composer, musician and humanitarian Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016), who is renowned for her innovations in composition, sound technology, research, philosophy and practices of listening, as well as feminist and environmental humanitarian projects. Less known is her work on all-ability improvisation through the Adaptive-Use Musical Instrument (AUMI), a free download/app that transforms any laptop, desktop, iPad or iPhone into a musical instrument that uses motion tracking to adapt to every body. Oliveros considered the AUMI a continuation of, not a departure from, her life’s work, listing it as her major research project with her department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in her final years. From 2007 until her passing, she spoke of the AUMI as interconnected with her other projects and collaborations intended to expand our abilities to listen, and thus to expand consciousness—such as the Sonic Meditations, Expanded Instrument System and Deep Listening® practice.

In this lecture/demonstration, jazz studies scholar Sherrie Tucker shares what she has learned as a member of the ongoing collaborative AUMI Research Project, including how it challenged her exclusive relationship with jazz as an object of study, and pivoted her jazz studies questions and methods toward explorations of inclusive mixed-ability listening, sounding and sociality. Participants are invited to bring laptops, iPads or iPhones (sorry, Android users), if they wish. Those who want to try the AUMI in advance may download it free of charge at http://aumiapp.com/download.php.

Sherrie Tucker (professor, American studies, University of Kansas) is the author of Dance Floor Democracy: The Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen (Duke, 2014) and Swing Shift: “All-Girl” Bands of the 1940s (Duke, 2000) and co-editor, with Nichole T. Rustin, of Big Ears: Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies (Duke, 2008). She is a member of the AUMI Editorial Collective, whose collaborative volume, Improvising Across Abilities: Pauline Oliveros and the Adaptive Use Musical Instrument (AUMI) is currently under review at University of Michigan Press. She is a member of two major collaborative research initiatives: the International Institute of Critical Improvisation Studies and Improvisation, Community and Social Practice (for which she served as facilitator for the Improvisation, Gender and the Body research area), both funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is a founding member of the Melba Liston Research Collective, a member of the AUMI (Adaptive Use Musical Instrument) Project and founding member of AUMI-KU InterArts, one of six member institutions of the AUMI Research Consortium. She was the Louis Armstrong Visiting Professor at the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University in 2004-2005, where she was a member of the Columbia Jazz Study Group. With Randal M. Jelks, she co-edits the journal American Studies. She serves with Deborah Wong and Jeremy Wallach as series editors for the Music/Culture Series at Wesleyan University Press. She is the proud holder of a Deep Listening® Ear-tificate.

For more information, contact Professor Jason Robinson (jrobinson@amherst.edu).

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

"The Red Plague Rid You for Learning Me Your Language": Artist Talk with Christopher Myers

Tue, Feb 4 2020 - 1:30pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum
Christopher Myers

Christopher Myers is an artist and writer based in New York City. A widely acclaimed author of literature for young people, he is also an accomplished fine artist who has lectured and exhibited internationally. His work questions what it means to be an artist and to create art that is rooted in the experience of global cultural exchange.

Join us for an artist talk with Christopher Myers to learn more about his artistic practice and the thinking behind this year’s Rotherwas Project.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
This program is supported by the Arts at Amherst Initiative and is free and open to all.
Campus contact: 

Reflections on Teaching with Rhonda Cobham-Sander

Thu, Feb 20 2020 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Frost Library, CHI Think Tank
Rhonda Cobham-Sander

Rhonda Cobham-Sander, Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of Black Studies and English, will reflect with us about her teaching now and how her teaching has evolved throughout her career at Amherst College.
Please RSVP through the CTL website.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Biology Monday Seminar

Mon, Feb 17 2020 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall A011
Biology Monday Seminar

Seminar with Javier Apfeld, Ph.D., assistant professor in the biology department at Northeastern University.
C. elegans processes sensory information to choose between freeloading and self-defense strategies
My lab’s goal is to elucidate how the brain regulates aging and resilience to oxidants, using the nematode C. elegans as a tractable model organism. Our work combines molecular genetics, quantitative microscopy, mathematical modelling, and engineering. During my Ph.D., I pioneered using genetics to study aging in Prof. Cynthia Kenyon’s lab, and discovered that intercellular communication regulates lifespan in the nematode C. elegans. I then translated this new science of aging in biotech. Returning to academia, I help develop enabling technologies for studying C. elegans aging in collaboration with Prof. Walter Fontana, a theorist and computational scientist.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Five College Dance Faculty Concert

Sat, Feb 22 2020 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Main Studio Theater

This year’s Five College Dance Faculty Concert features five faculty and guest artist works (one per campus) that diversely investigate human distance and intimacy. Set against the backdrop of global social and environmental crises, these performances provide ways to contemplate how we connect -- or not -- with our own internal landscapes, with other individuals, and with our physical surroundings.

All five pieces are premieres that either continue or newly initiate the artists’ choreographic investigations with Five College Dance students. Featuring new work by newer members of the Five College Dance community, this concert can be seen as a look into the future of Five College Dance.

Choreographers:
Deborah Goffe (Assistant Professor of Dance, Hampshire College)
Barbie Diewald (Assistant Professor of Dance, Mount Holyoke College)
Sarah Lass (Smith guest artist, Smith MFA ‘18)
Jenna Riegel (Assistant Professor of Dance, Amherst College)
Aston K McCullough (Assistant Professor of Dance Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
$5 for students/seniors, $10 for general admission
Campus contact: 

Five College Dance Faculty Concert

Repeats every day 3 times.
Thu, Feb 20 2020 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Fri, Feb 21 2020 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Sat, Feb 22 2020 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Main Studio Theater

This year’s Five College Dance Faculty Concert features five faculty and guest artist works (one per campus) that diversely investigate human distance and intimacy. Set against the backdrop of global social and environmental crises, these performances provide ways to contemplate how we connect -- or not -- with our own internal landscapes, with other individuals, and with our physical surroundings. All five pieces are premieres that either continue or newly initiate the artists’ choreographic investigations with Five College Dance students. Featuring new work by newer members of the Five College Dance community, this concert can be seen as a look into the future of Five College Dance. Choreographers: Deborah Goffe (Assistant Professor of Dance, Hampshire College) Barbie Diewald (Assistant Professor of Dance, Mount Holyoke College) Sarah Lass (Smith guest artist, Smith MFA ‘18) Jenna Riegel (Assistant Professor of Dance, Amherst College) Aston K McCullough (Assistant Professor of Dance Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
$5 for students/seniors, $10 for general admission
Campus contact: 

Sonia Guajajara Keynote

Thu, Feb 13 2020 - 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Conference Center Paradise Room 102

Indigenous Women on the Front Lines of Climate Activism: The Battle for Environmental Justice in the Amazon

Sônia Bone Guajajara is an indigenous environmentalist and political activist who advocates for indigenous rights in Brazil and is a leading voice for progressive change.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Reinterpreting Margaret Sanger

Thu, Feb 13 2020 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 201

A Five College Discussion with Loretta Ross, Joyce Follet and Joyce Berkman

When a Black woman walks through anti-abortion protesters at abortion clinics, chants of “Martin Luther King” and “Margaret Sanger” dog their footsteps, usually shouted by white people who claim that abortion is black genocide. They entwine these two iconic names as if one contradicts the other. This workshop will explore how the intersection of race and gender affects how Margaret Sanger is interpreted through a Black feminist lens.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

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