Five College Consortium

Five College Dance Annual Fall Lecture: "Moving Culture, Dancing Justice, A Conversation with Camille A. Brown"

Fri, Sep 28 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Robert Crown Center (RCC)

Camille A Brown is a dancer and choreographer for our times. Her commitment to "reclaiming the cultural narrative of African American identity" is a kind of connective tissue running through all of her artistic endeavors—from her early work as a performer with Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE, to her acclaimed dance-making with her company Camille A Brown & Dancers, her viral TED-Ed video on the history of African-American social dance, and her choreography for the recent Broadway revival of Once on This Island and the NBC production of Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert. In each instance, Ms. Brown's "bold work taps into both ancestral stories and contemporary culture to capture a range of deeply personal experiences." Don't miss this unique opportunity to hear directly from Camille A. Brown in a conversation moderated by Deborah Goffe, Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Dance at Hampshire College. The two will discuss Ms. Brown's intersecting career pathways through concert dance, choreography for theater and in commercial contexts, and her community engagement initiatives as social justice interventions.

Presented by Five College Dance, with support from generous co-sponsors Five Colleges Inc., Hampshire College Office of the President, the Office of the Dean of Faculty, the School of Humanities Arts and Cultural Studies, the Office of Multicultural Education and Inclusion, and the Ethics and the Common Good Project, and made possible through a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts.

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Directions and parking info: 
There is a parking lot in back of the RCC. The library lot and spaces on the lawn are also available for overflow parking.
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public
Event contact: 
Joanna Faraby Walker
Contact phone: 
(413) 559-6622
Contact email: 
jwalker@fivecolleges.edu
Campus contact: 

The history of African-American social dance - Camille A. Brown

Pablo Delano: Artist's Talk and Q&A

Thu, Sep 27 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Franklin Patterson Hall

Join us in Franklin Patterson Hall (main lecture hall) at 5.30pm for a talk by artist Pablo Delano, who will explore the origin and evolution of 'The Museum of the Old Colony', followed by a Q&A. We will then head over to the Hampshire College Art Gallery for refreshments and a chance to view the exhibition (from 7-8pm).

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'The Museum of the Old Colony', a conceptual art installation by Hartford-based artist Pablo Delano, derives its name in part from a U.S. brand of soft drink named Old Colony, popular in Puerto Rico since the 1950s. Old Colony (the beverage) remains available at island groceries and restaurants in two flavors: grape and pineapple. Meanwhile, Puerto Rico endures 523 years of ongoing colonial rule – first under Spain, now the U.S, since 1898. The island, officially defined as an “unincorporated territory of the United States,” is widely regarded as the world’s oldest colony.

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Talking Truth: Work That Reconnects

Thu, Oct 18 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Library, W.E.B. Du Bois Room: 2601, Floor 26

Engage your love for the Earth with a variety of practices. Work that Reconnects builds community and connectivity, reminding us of our core mission. Starting in the 1970s, these practices have spread around the world, shifting how people perceive and address climate change - helping us move from our intellect to our hearts. Facilitated by Bela Schultz '20, student of environmental psychology and trained facilitator.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Contact phone: 
413-577-0784
Campus contact: 

Destroy to Replace: What 21st Century Resistance Means to American Indians

Tue, Oct 16 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Integrated Sciences Building Room 145

Resistance Studies Initiative Fall Speaker Series: 
Distinguished researchers and activists share critical reflections on resistance issues.

Refreshments will be served
Open to all

Kathleen A. Brown-Perez is a faculty member in the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with an appointment in the Anthropology Department. She teaches criminal law and the Senior Honors Thesis seminar “Conquest by Law: The Use of Law to Subjugate and Marginalize in the U.S.” She has a JD and MBA from the University of Iowa and is licensed to practice in Arizona and Massachusetts. Previously a corporate attorney in Boston, Kathleen now limits her legal practice to federal Indian law. 

 A member of the Brothertown Indian Nation (Wisconsin), her research and publications focus on issues of federal Indian policy and law, including sovereignty, identity, and federal acknowledgment. Recent publications include the article "By Whatever Means Necessary: The U.S. Government’s Ongoing Attempts to Remove Indigenous Peoples During an Era of Self-(De)termination" in the New Diversities special issue on Indigenous Politics of Resistance: From Erasure to Recognition (2017), and the chapter "'An Inconvenient Truth': The Use of Federal Policy to Erase American Indians, Indian Tribes, and Indigenous Heritage" in Heritage at the Interface (Univ. of Florida 2018). 

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-545-0394
Campus contact: 

Philosophy Lecture: Cynthia Willett

Thu, Sep 27 2018 - 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Seelye Hall 201

Cynthia Willett, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Philosophy at Emory University, will present a lecture titled "Empathy and a Prison Roast." She will explore whether humor can enable us to bridge social and cultural divides rather than reinforcing them, and ask what kind of empathy could do this radical work. Willett writes, "While straight satire and ridicule subverts or reinforces lines of power, the empathetic humor of the roast, laced with flirtatious mockery, can offer far more than just a temporary break from the harsh realities of life.

Campus: 
Smith College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Performance of Trifles by Susan Glaspell

Repeats every day until Sat Oct 20 2018.
Thu, Oct 18 2018 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Fri, Oct 19 2018 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Sat, Oct 20 2018 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Rooke Theatre

 An important early feminist drama from 1916, the play explores the divide between men and women and poses the questions "What is justice?" and "Who gets to judge?"

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

An Evening with Aatish Taseer ’03

Wed, Oct 10 2018 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

Join us for an evening with Aatish Taseer ’03, author and contributing opinion writer for the International New York Times.

In his new book, The Twice-Born: Life and Death on the Ganges, Aatish Taseer embarks on a journey of self-discovery in an intoxicating, unsettling personal reckoning with modern India, where ancient customs collide with the contemporary politics of revivalism and revenge

When Aatish Taseer first came to Benares, the spiritual capital of Hinduism, he was eighteen, the Westernized child of an Indian journalist and a Pakistani politician, raised among the intellectual and cultural elite of New Delhi. Nearly two decades later, Taseer leaves his life in Manhattan to go in search of the Brahmins, wanting to understand his own estrangement from India through their ties to tradition.

Known as the twice-born—first into the flesh, and again when initiated into their vocation—the Brahmins are a caste devoted to sacred learning. But what Taseer finds in Benares, the holy city of death also known as Varanasi, is a window on an India as internally fractured as his own continent-bridging identity. At every turn, the seductive, homogenizing force of modernity collides with the insistent presence of the past. In a globalized world, to be modern is to renounce India—and yet the tide of nationalism is rising, heralded by cries of “Victory to Mother India!” and an outbreak of anti-Muslim violence.

From the narrow streets of the temple town to a Modi rally in Delhi, among the blossoming cotton trees and the bathers and burning corpses of the Ganges, Taseer struggles to reconcile magic with reason, faith in tradition with hope for the future and the brutalities of the caste system, all the while challenging his own myths about himself, his past, and his countries old and new.

Aatish Taseer was born in 1980. He is the author of the memoir Stranger to History: A Son’s Journey Through Islamic Lands and three acclaimed novels: The Way Things Were, a finalist for the 2016 Jan Michalski prize; The Temple-Goers, which was short-listed for the Costa First Novel Award; and Noon. His work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. He is a contributing writer for The International New York Times and lives in New Delhi and New York.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-7666
Campus contact: 

"Religion and Diplomacy: The Vatican and the Post-Soviet Orthodox World"

Mon, Oct 1 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lewis Global Studies Center, Wright Hall
Since the fall of the Soviet Union, most former communist, officially atheistic, states have seen a resurgence in religious affiliation, especially Eastern Orthodox Christianity. While historically a part of a transnational Orthodox world that includes regions in Eastern and Central Europe, the Balkans, Eurasia, and the Middle East, post-Soviet states nevertheless routinely engage and seek out diplomatic relations with the Vatican—a tiny state that nonetheless lays claim to the largest global “population.”  Why do post-Soviet states routinely seek relations with the Vatican, and how do these diplomatic relations contribute to a broader dialogue, particularly on problems of social justice?  What attracts them to this sui generis state?  More broadly, what are the pressing geopolitical, social and cultural interests that engage religious actors and issues in diplomacy? 
 
Tamara Grdzelidze is an Orthodox theologian who is currently the nation of Georgia’s ambassador to the Holy See. Ambassador Grdzelidze was previously on the staff of the World Council of Churches, and her scholarship explores topics in the Georgian Orthodox tradition, Orthodox monasticism, and early Christian theology.
 
Sponsored by Smith College's Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies Program, Religion Department, Lewis Global Studies Center and Lecture Committee; Five College REEES Program; and Mount Holyoke College
Campus: 
Smith College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Book Salon with Rajani Bhatia on Gender Before Birth: Sex Selection in a Transnational Context

Tue, Oct 2 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street, South Hadley, MA

Join us for a book talk and Q&A with Rajani Bhatia (Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality, University at Albany, SUNY) on her new book Gender Before Birth: Sex Selection in a Transnational Context (University of Washington Press).

In the mid-1990s, the international community pronounced prenatal sex selection via abortion an "act of violence against women" and "unethical." At the same time, new developments in reproductive technology in the United States led to a method of sex selection before conception; its US inventor marketed the practice as "family balancing" and defended it with the rhetoric of freedom of choice. In Gender before Birth, Rajani Bhatia takes on the double standard of how similar practices in the West and non-West are divergently named and framed.

Bhatia's extensive fieldwork includes interviews with clinicians, scientists, biomedical service providers, and feminist activists, and her resulting analysis extends both feminist theory on reproduction and feminist science and technology studies. She argues that we are at the beginning of a changing transnational terrain that presents new challenges to theorized inequality in reproduction, demonstrating how the technosciences often get embroiled in colonial gender and racial politics.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Directions and parking info: 
https://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc/directions_parking
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
413-538-2275
Campus contact: 

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