Alphabet Histories: From Ancient Sources to Global Infrastructure

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Leo Weinstein Auditorium, Wright Hall, 5 Chapin Drive

Presented by Johanna Drucker, the Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA. One of the longest-lasting technologies of knowledge production, the alphabet continues to play a major role in global information infrastructure. This year's Enid Mark lecture will be presented by Johanna Drucker, the Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA. She is internationally known for her work in artists’ books, the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. She is currently the Inaugural Beinecke Fellow in Material Cultures at Yale. The lecture will take place from 6:30-8pm; reception to follow.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Addressing Open Challenges in Genomics and Data Science Education

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Seelye 106, 2 Seelye Drive

In this talk, Stephanie Hicks of the Department of Biostatistics at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health will address some open challenges teaching students how to analyzing data, with examples of applications of genomics data.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Between the Jewish Question and the Global Question

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Seelye 201, 2 Seelye Drive

“Between the Jewish Question and the Global Question: Inheriting, Differentiating and Characterizing the Moral and the Legal in Kant, Hume and the 18th Century” presented by Rahul Govind, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Delhi. Political argument in 17th century Europe was preoccupied with the relationship between 'Judaic Law' and Christianity, all connected to the attempt to understand "natural law". Prof. Govind will examine the legacy, reconfiguration and abandonment of this problematic, and the impact of this debate on Kant and Hume. He will explore how this debate conditions modern theories of human history and human nature, and how it informs thinking about universality in epistemology and politics

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Addressing Open Challenges in Genomics and Data Science Education

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Seelye 106, 2 Seelye Drive

“Addressing Open Challenges in Genomics and Data Science Education” In this talk, Stephanie Hicks of the Department of Biostatistics at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health will address some open challenges teaching students how to analyzing data, with examples of applications of genomics data.

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Lecture: Abdellah Taïa

Thu, Apr 18 2019 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Campus Center 103/4, 100 Elm Street

Abdellah Taïa is a Moroccan writer and filmmaker who has been based in Paris since 1998. In 2007, he became the first Moroccan writer ever to publicly come out as gay in a country where homosexuality is still considered a crime. Talk will be given in English. 

Campus: 
Smith College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Pioneer Valley Maker Faire

Sat, Apr 13 2019 - 11:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 
Davis Center, 12 Prospect Street
PV Maker Faire

25+ Hands-on Making Booths. 3 Interactive Outdoor Installations. 10 Immersive Demonstrations & Workshops and FOOD! Maker Faire is a celebration of invention, creativity, and curiosity showcasing the very best of the Pioneer Valley Maker Movement.

Sponsored by Smith College Design Thinking Initiative, Smith College Imaging Center, Smith College Museum of Art, Mount Holyoke College Fimbel Maker and Innovation Lab, and We Are Makers, with support from national, regional, and local businesses and organizations.

Campus: 
Smith College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free admission
Campus contact: 

Imagining the Underworld: Life after Death in Ancient Greek Religion

Mon, Apr 15 2019 - 4:30pm
Location: 
Beneski Earth Sciences Building, Room 107 (Paino)
Imagining the Underworld: Life after Death in Ancient Greek Religion

How did the ancient Greeks imagine the underworld? Their depictions of the life after death reveal the variety of conflicting ideas in the Greek tradition, from the continuative existences after death that preserve cultural memories to the compensatory afterlives that rectify the incompleteness of justice in the mortal world to the grand cosmic visions that bring together life and death, mortal and immortal, chthonic and celestial, into a single system. All these imaginings of afterlife make use of familiar tropes, names and images from the Greek mythic tradition, and each of the authors of an afterlife vision thinks with and through an imagined underworld in different ways for different ends.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Poetry Reading: Jericho Brown

Thu, Apr 11 2019 - 8:00pm
Location: 
Amherst Books, 115
Jericho Brown

Claudia Rankine has said, “To read Jericho Brown's poems is to encounter devastating genius." Brown’s first book, Please, won the American Book Award. His second book, The New Testament, won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith says of his forthcoming third collection, The Tradition, “These astounding poems […] don't merely hold a lens up to the world and watch from a safe distance; they run or roll or stomp their way into what matters―loss, desire, rage, becoming―and stay there until something necessary begins to make sense.” Brown directs the Creative Writing Program at Emory University.

The reading is free and open to the public and will be followed by refreshments.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

How Democracies Die: American Democracy After Two Years of Trump

Thu, Apr 11 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall, room A011
levitsky

Steven Levitsky will give a talk titled “ How Democracies Die: American Democracy After Two Years of Trump". Steven Levitsky is a professor of government at Harvard University. He is co-author of the best-seller “How Democracies Die”. Professor Levitsky is also and expert on Latin American politics, populism, democratic backsliding, and competitive authoritarianism. He is currently working on writing about revolutionary regimes.

This event is being sponsored by The Political Science Department of Amherst College along with funding support from the Lamont Fund and the Lurcy Endowment.

This event is free and open to the public.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Seeing the Moon in Islamic Traditions

Wed, Apr 10 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum
seeing the moon

Join us for a conversation with Amherst College Muslim Student Association and advisors to learn more about the lunar calendar and moon sightseeing in Islamic traditions leading up to the month of Ramadan. People of all religions, beliefs and experience levels are invited to attend. This program is offered in conjunction with Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein with support from the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life and the Muslim Students Association.

This event is free and open to all!

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

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