Five College Consortium

Russian Film Screening: Everybody Dies But Me • ВСЕ УМРУТ, А Я ОСТАНУСЬ

Thu, Apr 26 2018 - 4:30pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)

Join us for a screening of Everybody Dies But Me (ВСЕ УМРУТ, А Я ОСТАНУСЬ). The film is from 2008 and directed by Valeria Gai Germanika. The runtime is 80 minutes. This film will be shown in Russian with English subtitles.

The lifelong friendship of three young women is tested in this hard-hitting coming-of-age drama
that broke new ground in post-Soviet cinema with its unflinching, controversial account
of teenage life in a grim urban neighborhood.

The film will be screened at both 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Accessibility info: 
Check with Accessibility Services on campus for more information about accessibility at this event
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-2350
Contact email: 
tvallaste@amherst.edu
Campus contact: 

Tales from the Front: Enhancing the Learning Environment of Large Introductory Stem Courses with Team-Based Learning

Wed, Apr 25 2018 - 12:15pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
Frost Library, CHI Think Tank

Part of our "Food for Thought" lunch series, join Caroline Goutte of the biology, biochemistry-biophysics and neuroscience departments, as well as Alix Purdy of the biology and biochemistry-biophysics departments for lunch and a discussion about team-based learning in introductory STEM courses.

For several iterations now, we have converted the large-lecture based introductory molecular biology course into a course that blends lectures, online quizzing, team-based learning and laboratory applications. Each year we learn what works and what doesn’t, and the course improves a bit more. We finally feel that we’ve reached an effective blend that achieves a dynamic learning environment in which students tackle challenging material and build life-long skills of collaborative inquiry. Kindly R.S.V.P. at the link below.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free but REGISTRATION REQUIRED
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-5935
Contact email: 
mlowe@amherst.edu
Campus contact: 

The Ethics and the Common Food Symposium

Fri, Apr 27 2018 - 11:30am to 3:00pm
Location: 
Roos Rohde House (Mixed Nuts Student Coop)

Hampshire’s inaugural Ethics and the Common Food Symposium will take place on Friday, April 27th from 11:30-2:45 in the Roos-Rhode House on the Hampshire Campus.

Join us as we smell, taste, and chew through the ethics of producing, sourcing, and consuming food. Jade Silverstein, Daniel Lamport, and Grant Holub-Moorman will present their research on seafood retail and consumption, meat production and processing, and coffee production and sourcing. These three will be joined by a panel of researcher-activists and market thinkers: Nicole Civita (Global Food Ethics and Policy Program’s Ethically Benchmarking Food Systems project), Steven Hedlund (Global Aquaculture Alliance), and Alison Wortman (Dean's Beans).

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public
Event contact: 
Grant Holub-Moorman
Contact phone: 
(919) 619-3611
Contact email: 
gch14@hampshire.edu
Campus contact: 

'Sexology's Afterlives'

Mon, Apr 23 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Campus Center 911-15

A talk by Laura Doan, University of Manchester

A major achievement of transnational sexology studies is its attentiveness to the epistemological consequences of movement. To build on this work, this paper scrutinizes recent scholarly debates about what counts as sexological to rethink our historiographical methods in accounting for the public dissemination of sexology, a complex cultural process often characterized simply as popularization. Drawing on the critique of popularization forged by historians and sociologists of science, I suggest that formulations such as “literary sexology” or “vernacular sexology” might be better understood as pioneering models of public dissemination rather than as forms of sexological knowledge. 

Laura Doan is Professor of Cultural History and Sexuality studies at the University of Manchester. She is the author of Disturbing Practices: History, Sexuality and Women's Experience of Modern War (Chicago, 2013) and Fashioning Sapphism: The Origins of a Modern English Lesbian Culture (Columbia, 2001). Her current research project (Heterosexuality: An Unnatural History) explores how the idea of the normal became the most powerful ideological force of the modern age.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
413-545-1922
Contact email: 
lindah@umass.edu

'Tropical Cyclone Intensification under Moderate Vertical Wind Shear'

Tue, Apr 24 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Integrative Learning Center Room: S211

"Tropical Cyclone Intensification under Moderate Vertical Wind Shear" will be discussed by Rosimar Rios-Berrios of the National Center for Atmospheric Researchin Boulder, Colorado.

Abstract: Tropical cyclones, also known as hurricanes or typhoons, are amongst the most powerful atmospheric phenomena.  Accurate forecasts of where a tropical cyclone will move towards (i.e., track), how strong the accompanying winds will be (i.e., intensity), and how much precipitation will accumulate are crucial to minimize the loss of lives and property. These forecasts, however, become particularly uncertain when a tropical cyclone moves through a region of vertical wind shear.  Although vertical wind shear is generally negative for tropical cyclones, many tropical cyclones can intensify under moderate shear—the range of shear magnitudes that are neither too weak nor too strong (5–10 m s−1).  Explaining why and how tropical cyclones can intensify when conditions are seemingly unfavorable is a necessary step towards understanding and predicting tropical cyclone impacts. 

BRIDGE is supported by a Campus Climate Improvement Grant. Learn more: http://blogs.umass.edu/bridge

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

'Keeping it Real with EUREKA! A Smart STEM-Ed Partnership'

Tue, Apr 24 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Hasbrouck Hall Room: 138

Christine Hatch, EUREKA! Program faculty liaison and Extension associate professor in the Geosciences Department, will describe the EUREKA! program, highlight how this program makes a real and lasting difference in the lives of the scholars who join, discuss its importance for underrepresented groups at a key life stage, translate that knowledge into quantifiable broader impacts, and of course, show you just how much fun it is.

Have you found yourself wondering how to channel your science into meaningful broader impacts that really make a difference?  Are you curious about the dynamic group of 8th - 12th grade girls in bright red t-shirts who occupy UMass every July?  Do you know a colleague, or are you one of the CNS faculty who have been teaching STEM workshops in this exciting outreach program for middle and high school girls from Girls Inc. Holyoke?

The UMass-Holyoke Girls Inc. EUREKA! program is entering its sixth year on campus and is only one of 20 such programs connected to just under a hundred girls in. programs around the country.  This presentation will describe the program, highlight how this program makes a real and lasting difference in the lives of the scholars who join, discuss its importance for underrepresented groups at a key life stage, translate that knowledge into quantifiable broader impacts, and of course, show you just how much fun it is.

 For more information, visit: https://www.cns.umass.edu/outreach/eureka-umass-amherst  Or email: eureka@umass.edu

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
413-575-0030
Contact email: 
holly@hollyhargraves.com

'A Road to Damascus' - in words and music

Tue, Apr 17 2018 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Commonwealth Honors College Building Room: 157

An evening with Lebanese novelist and filmmaker Meedo Taha reading from his just-published novel A Road to Damascus and Layaali Arabic Music Trio: Jamal Sinno (qanun), Said Khoury (oud), and Michel Moushabeck (percussion).

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
413-545-3478
Contact email: 
jhicks@complit.umass.edu

'What Makes a Great City' by Alexander Garvin

Thu, Apr 19 2018 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Olver Design Building Room: 170

Alexander Garvin has combined a career in urban planning and real estate with teaching, architecture, and public service. He is currently president and CEO of AGA Public Realm Strategists, Inc., a planning and design firm in New York City that is responsible for initial master plans for the Atlanta BeltLine; Tessera (a 700-acre new community outside Austin); and Hinton Park in Collierville, Tennessee. Between 1996 and 2005 he was managing director for planning at NYC2012, the committee established to bring the Summer Olympics to New York in 2012. During 2002-2003, as Vice President for Planning, Design and Development, he was responsible for planning the rebuilding of the World Trade Center for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. Over the last 46 years he has held prominent positions in five New York City administrations, including Deputy Commissioner of Housing and City Planning Commissioner.

Garvin has won numerous awards, including the Municipal Art Society ‘s New York City Masterwork Award for Best Planning and Urban Design, the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter Merit Award, and the American Planning Association New York City Chapter, Distinguished Service Award.

In addition to his professional work, for the past 50 years Garvin has taught at Yale University, his alma mater, where, as Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning and Management, he has taught a wide range of courses in architecture, city planning, and real estate development. Garvin has also taught workshops on basic real estate development for the Urban Land Institute.

Garvin is the author of "The American City: What Works and What Doesn’t," now in its third edition; "The Planning Game," "Public Parks: The Key to Livable Communities" and his newest book, "What Makes a Great City," published in 2017 by Island Press.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

'At Night' by Catie Newell

Tue, Apr 17 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Olver Design Building

Catie Newell is the founding principal of the architecture and art practice *Alibi Studio. Her creative practice has been widely recognized for reworking existing spaces using material aggregations and the effects of light and darkness. Newell’s work explores design construction and materiality in relationship to location, geography, and cultural contingencies; she is known for her iterative process of site-specific fabrication. 

Newell won the 2011 ArtPrize Best Use of Urban Space Juried Award and the 2011 Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Designers. Newell exhibited at the 2012 Architecture Venice Biennale and the 2015 Lille3000 Art Triennial. In 2017 the University of Michigan Museum of Art hosted Newell’s museum solo show, Overnight. She is a Lucas Fellow, a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, and a Kresge Arts Fellow.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

'The Original Sin of Europe’s Dark Twentieth Century', talk by Stefan Ihrig

Tue, Apr 24 2018 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies Room: event hall 758 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA

Our knowledge of the Armenian Genocide and of what it meant for the world at the time has been expanding rapidly in recent years. Stefan Ihrig shows that it also provoked intense debates in Germany after World War I – to such an extent that we can clearly identify a larger and true genocide debate taking place there over the course of a few years.

Many Germans came to the wrong conclusions though: for German nationalists and the Nazis the Armenian Genocide presented core lessons on ethnic policies and the international order. By virtue of its reception and the debates it provoked the Armenian Genocide thus was part of the prehistory of the Shoah. What does this mean for our understanding of the twentieth century? In this lecture Ihrig will develop some ideas on how we must rethink some core notions of the history of the last century.

Stefan Ihrig is a Professor of History at the University of Haifa, in the Department of General History and the Haifa Center for German and European Studies. His books include Justifying Genocide—Germany and the Armenians from Bismarck to Hitler (Harvard University Press, 2016), Atatürk in the Nazi Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2014) and Wer sind die Moldawier? (“Who are the Moldovans?”, Ibidem, 2008).

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
413-835-0221
Contact email: 
dnoto@umass.edu

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