"Can We Build Social Media that's Good for Society?" A Talk by Ethan Zuckerman

Mon, Dec 2 2019 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Integrative Learning Center Room: Communications Hub, 3rd floor
Ethan Zuckerman

Presented by the UMass Amherst College of Information and Computer Sciences and the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. 

The tech backlash is in full force, and it's rapidly becoming conventional wisdom that social media is polarizing our politics, abusing our attention, misinforming our democracy and damaging our emotional health. But the situation is far more complex than it seems at first glance. Some of these critiques are not well supported by research. And those that are true apply to a particular model of social media, based around surveillant advertising and an endless quest for human attention. What would it mean to build social media expressly designed to strengthen democratic society? Can we imagine an alternative system where public service digital media overcomes some of the thorniest problems of our contemporary online world?

Ethan Zuckerman is Director of the Center for Civic Media, Associate Professor of the Practice at the MIT Media Lab, Cofounder of the citizen media community, Global Voices, and the author of Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection. Prior to MIT, Ethan worked with the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University on projects focused on civic media, freedom of speech online, and understanding media ecosystems. He led a team focused on Media Cloud, a project that continues to build an archive of news stories and blog posts in order to apply language processing and present ways to analyze and visualize the resulting data. Zuckerman also founded Geekcorp, a non-profit technology volunteer corps that has done work in over a dozen countries, and helped to found Tripod, an early participatory media company.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Free admission
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R.W. Kern Center Tour

Fri, Dec 6 2019 - 2:30pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
R.W. Kern Center Atrium

Come explore the R.W. Kern Center, one of just 17 certified Living Buildings in the world- right on Hampshire's campus!

See how rainwater is collected, filtered, and treated to supply the building's potable water. Check out the greywater system to learn how wastewater is filtered via the building's indoor plants and constructed wetlands. We’ll lift the hood on the composting toilets, kick the tires on the rooftop solar, and see how we keep tabs on where the electricity goes. We'll also take look at the finishes and materials that make up a Living Building, and some clever and puzzling details you might miss on a casual walk-through.

For more Living Building fun head over to the Hitchcock Center for the Environment at 4pm!

Campus: 
Hampshire College
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Climate Change, The Land and Spirituality: Making the Connections

Thu, Dec 5 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
Red Barn

Join us for a lively moderated discussion with two local spiritual leaders, Ellen Bernstein and Margaret Bullit Jonas whose work connects the land, climate change, and spiritual practice. The evening’s conversation will feature each of their new books, revealing the intersection of the outer and inner landscapes of our lives. This event is co-sponsored by Hampshire College Spiritual Life and Kestrel Land Trust

For a full description, please visit: https://www.kestreltrust.org/calendar/climate-change-spirituality-book-e...

Campus: 
Hampshire College
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Amherst Symphony Orchestra Concert Russian Season III: Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade

Sat, Dec 7 2019 - 8:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Buckley Recital Hall
Amherst Symphony Orchestra Concert

The Amherst Symphony Orchestra (“ASO”) presents the third of its ongoing series of works by Russian classical composers with a concert of music by Khatchaturian, Glazunov, and Rimsky-Korsakov. Tickets are required and are available at the door. Free for Five College students.

The concert opens with the propulsive and percussive “Sabre Dance,” from Aram Khatchurian’s ballet “Gayane,” a wild “wedding dance” of Armenian folk melodies so popular, it topped U.S. jukebox charts in 1948. The performance continues with the Romantic violin concerto of Alexandr Glazunov, with soloist Maya Bulos (Amherst College class of 2020), and closes with Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s showpiece "Scheherazade." This iconic masterpiece depicts the heroic legend of a vizier’s daughter who outwits an embittered, murderous monarch. She thus saves her own life and that of countless other women, by telling captivating tales over the course of 1001 nights.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Tickets may be purchased at the door only. Prices are $10 general public; $5 senior citizens, students with ID and children under 12, and are free to Five College students with ID.
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Russian Film Screening: "The Student" • Ученик

Thu, Dec 5 2019 - 4:30pm to 9:30pm
Location: 
Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)
The Student

А film that attracted controversy because of both its subject matter and its director, about a secondary-school student whose fundamentalist views lead to painful confrontations with the adults in his life and unforeseen tragic consequences.

Directed by Kirill Serebrennikov, the film was released in 2016, and its duration is 118 minutes.

The film is in Russian with English subtitles. There are two screenings: 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Lee Ann Roripaugh Poetry Reading

Tue, Nov 19 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Campus Center 208 Multipurpose Room

Lee Ann Roripaugh writes with imagination and candor, fearlessly engaging with a broad range of topics: Japanese internment, the Fukushima disaster, and the semiotics of language. Roripaugh’s latest collection of poems, tsunami vs. the fukushima 50 (Milkweed Editions, 2019) distills the grand scale of natural (and human-influenced) disasters through compassionate, complicated monologues and persona poems, capturing the anxieties of humans faced with the previously unthinkable. In the poem “mothra flies again,” a woman pregnant with twins wrestles with the unknown following the Fukushima disaster: “at night I lie awake and unpack / my worries like wooden kokeishi dolls, / nested one inside the other // what if? what if? what if?” Roripaugh has been awarded the Association of Asian American Studies Book Award in Poetry/Prose as well as the South Dakota Arts Council Artist Fellowship Grant. Her poem “Utsuroi” was recently featured on recent U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith's podcast, “The Slowdown.” Roripaugh is currently the South Dakota Poet Laureate, and teaches literature and creative writing at the University of South Dakota. Supported by the Smith College Museum of Art and the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures.

Campus: 
Smith College
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Free and open to the public.
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"Unsettling"

Mon, Nov 18 2019 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Graham Hall-HILLYR

"Unsettling" by filmmaker Iris Zaki
Dr. Iris Zaki, independent documentary filmmaker:
What happens when a leftist from Tel Aviv spends a month living in the Israeli settlement of Tekoa? Zaki will screen her controversial film "Unsettling" and talk about the challenges of making films about topics that arouse great passion and unnerve audiences.

Sponsored by the Smith College Lecture Committee, the Roth Fund of the Program in Jewish Studies, the Program in Middle East Studies, and the Program in Film and Media Studies.

Campus: 
Smith College
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Faculty Concert: Rémy Taghavi, Bassoon and Nadine Shank, Piano

Thu, Nov 21 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Fine Arts Center Bezanson Recital Hall
Faculty Concert

The Department of Music & Dance presents a faculty concert by Rémy Taghavi, bassoon and Nadine Shank, piano.

With Bixby Kennedy, clarinet.

The concert includes music by Robert Schumann, Francis Poulenc, Luigi Zaninelli, François Devienne and Philippe Hersant.

Free and open to the public.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Free admission
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Avery Sharpe Sextet: 400

Thu, Nov 21 2019 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Bowker Auditorium
Avery Sharpe Sextet

In 1619, the Dutch brought the first African slaves to Jamestown, Virginia. Acclaimed bassist and composer Avery Sharpe marks this 400th anniversary with a new original piece of music touched by spirituals, gospel, blues, jazz and classical idioms, and featuring a video component.

Pre-performance talk in the auditorium at 6:30 p.m.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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General Admission $15; Students $7
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Documentary Screening "LOST and FOUND"

Thu, Nov 21 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Carney Auditorium College of Education 813 North Street Amherst, MA 01003
LOST and FOUND

Join us for a early screening of a powerful documentary about childhood trauma and related issues of conflict and displacement. Panel of experts to support discussion about conflict, trauma, and the Rohingya people to follow viewing.

Raffle Drawing and Door Prizes.

Presented by The Center for International Education through generous support from National Geographic

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Free admission
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