Exhibit: 'Healing The Earth: Tibetan Sand Mandala'

Tue, Apr 17 2018 - 10:00am to Fri, Apr 20 2018 - 4:00pm
Location: 
Old Chapel
umass mandala 2 credit John Suchocki

Of all the artistic traditions of Tantric Buddhism, painting with colored sand is one of the most unique and exquisite. Millions of grains of sand are painstakingly laid in place on a flat platform over a period of four days. All across the world, the creation and beauty of a Tibetan Sand Mandala painting is an abiding phenomenon of art and construction, emanating spiritual and healing power for all who experience it.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.
Contact phone: 
413-545-2511 | 1-800-999-UMAS
Contact email: 
facbox@umass.edu

Trans Art Showcase and Open Mic

Thu, Apr 19 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Fine Arts Center Room: FAC Arts Bridge
Copy of 2018 Trans Visibility Week (1) 5

A one night showcase dedicated to the work of trans individuals by trans individuals. We are looking for 2D/3D artists, singers, dancers, poets, and all manner of performing artists. This event is open to all but submissions will only be accepted from transgender and nonbinary individuals. 

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Free and open to the public.

14th Annual Historical Swordsmanship Symposium

Sat, Apr 28 2018 - 9:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
The Arthur F. Kinney Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, 650 East Pleasant Street, Amherst
4 28 Swords

14th Annual Historical Swordsmanship Symposium.

Various speakers will present lectures and demonstrations on the topic of historical swordsmanship. Lunch is provided.

Pre-registration required via email: renaissance@english.umass.edu or phone 413-577-3600 by April 25th

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

"Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario

Fri, Sep 21 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Location: 
Lewis-Sebring Commons, Valentine Hall, Mullins and Faerber Rooms
Vicario

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2018-19 presents a lecture titled " Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario, assistant professor of Art and the History of Art.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Fall Orientation Dance Concert and Dance Party

Fri, Sep 7 2018 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Kirby Memorial Theater
DSC 23041

Join the theater and dance department as we us kick off the new school year with original performances by Amherst and Five College faculty members Dante Brown, Leslie Frye Maietta, Katie Martin, Jake Meginsky and Jen Polins, as well as dancing and stepping at Amherst College (DASAC)!

A dance party for students will immediately follow in Holden Theater with D.J. Jake Meginksy. Join us for a meet-and-greet with pizza, music and dancing!

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Ticket info: 
Events are free and open to the Amherst and Five College communities. Tickets are not required.
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The Ferguson Rebellion, Five Years On; or, Philosophy and the Event, American-Style

Thu, Sep 20 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Dwight Hall 101
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Paul Taylor

W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy  -  Vanderbilt University

 

Next year will mark the 5th anniversary of the day Darren Wilson killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In the aftermath of that day, "Ferguson"

seemed to be the name not just of a place but also of an event, in the fullest sense of that term. The word stood for something momentous, like Appomattox or Dunkirk or Selma or Stonewall (the inn and the 1969 riots, not the man). It marked one of those periodic occasions that push people to reflect on the demands of justice, the art of living well, and the burdens of living well together. Now, though, every passing day - every new outrage, tweet, controversy, or death - pushes this occasion farther away from the living present, and threatens to diminish its claim to relevance.

 

"The Ferguson Rebellion, Five Years On" explains what it means to treat Ferguson as an event, and to take that event seriously even now as a contemporary barometer of important social conditions. The temptation to forget it, to let the energy from the event die out like spent nuclear fuel, is dangerous. It is also, though, entirely predictable in light of the conditions that Ferguson brought to light. Provoked but not constrained by Alain Badiou's influential work on the philosophy of the event, this talk will suggest a way of approaching the upheavals in Ferguson that is appropriate to the moment and to the burdens of responsible and responsive ethical life.

 

Thursday, September 20, 2018

4:30

Dwight Hall 101

Mount Holyoke College

Reception following lecture

Roger W. Holmes Lecture

Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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The Art of Is

Tue, Sep 25 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Mead Art Museum
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The Mead is teaming up with the first-year seminar Thinking Through Improvisation, taught by Darryl Harper, visiting professor of music, to bring Stephen Nachmanovitch to campus. Nachmanovitch, author of Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art, argues that improvisation and creativity are important tools for everyone. Join us for a talk by Nachmanovitch about the connection between time and improvisation.

This program is offered in conjunction with Thinking Through Improvisation First-Year Seminar and the Arts at Amherst Initiative. This program is also a part of the Keeping Time Program Series: a series of conversations, performances, and workshops offered in conjunction with the Mead’s exhibition, Timing Is Everything. This series will bring guests from across disciplines to share their work with the public and engage in conversations about how time impacts their practices. Keeping Time programs are free and open to all!

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Contact phone: 
(413) 542-5651
Campus contact: 

Imagining Community, Living In Community

Mon, Oct 1 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm
Location: 
Cape Cod Lounge, UMass Amherst Student Union
10

This panel will explore efforts to create intentional communities based on participants' visions of just and harmonious social relationships. Often described as “utopian,” these movements have focused on realizing revolutionary visions on a small scale in the “here and now,” and were envisioned by participants as an opportunity to live rightly even within a larger oppressive society. Recognizing the complicated social realities in which such movements have always been embedded, this event places practitioners and scholars in critical conversation about the movements' premises, challenges, contradictions, blind spots, impacts, and transformative potentials.

Presenters include Jasmine Burems, Wildseed Community Farm and Healing Village; Kate Daloz, author of We Are As Gods: Back to the Land in the 1970s on the Quest for a New America; Lior Libman, Binghamton University and a historian of the kibbutz; and Ousmane Power-Green, Clark University and the David Ruggles Center and author of Against Wind and Tide: The African American Struggle against the Colonization Movement.

Free and open to the public. Book signing to follow.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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John Lax Memorial Lecture - Peter C. Perdue: "From Paris to Beijing in 1900: A Global Moment?"

Thu, Oct 18 2018 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Mary Woolley Hall, NY Room
2018 John Lax Poster

Peter C. Perdue, Professor of History, Yale University, will speak on "From Paris to Beijing in 1900: A Global Moment?"

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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African American Perspectives on Othello: Artist Curlee Raven Holton in Conversation with Actor and Playwright Keith Hamilton Cobb

Fri, Nov 2 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Art Building, Gamble Auditorium A
ImageHandler

In their respective artistic fields, Curlee Raven Holton and Keith Hamilton Cobb have both engaged in new interpretations of William Shakespeare’s Othello. In their public conversation, Holton and Cobb will discuss the agency of artists of African descent, and share the experiences that led to their Othello-inspired projects in printmaking and theaterThe museum will have extended hours following the event.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

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