Five College Consortium

ONE FIFTH/HUMANITY: MOD E.ASIA

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
East Asian Studies
Course Number: 
100
Institution: 
Smith College
Same as HST 100. This introductory course looks comparatively at the histories of China, Japan and Korea from the late 18th century to the present. It examines the struggles of these countries to preserve or regain their independence and establish their national identities in a rapidly emerging and often violent modern world order. Although each of these countries has its own distinctive identity, their overlapping histories (and dilemmas) give the region a coherent identity. We also look at how individuals respond to and are shaped by larger historical movements.
Linked Course: 
Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section. To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.
Linked Course Comments: 
You must also register for a Lecture section.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
21434
Schedule #: 
20382-F16

Course Sections

ONE FIFTH/HUMANITY: MOD E.ASIA
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
D02 0.0 Ernest Benz ebenz@smith.edu T 03:00-03:50 SEELYE 204

Literary Currents-Spain II

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Spanish
Course Number: 
321
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Introduction to Spanish literature from 1700 to the present; emphasis on literary currents and their relation to culture and history of the period. Representative drama, poetry, and narrative. Prerequisite: SPANISH 311 or consent of instructor. (Gen.Ed. AL)
Comments: 
PreReq: SPANISH 311 or 354
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
72649

Course Sections

Literary Currents-Spain II
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 3.0 Guillem Molla TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

Ways of Knowing in CSI

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0204
Institution: 
Hampshire College
This course is designed for students transitioning into Division II to introduce them to faculty in the School of Critical Social Inquiry: the kinds of questions we ask, research methodologies we use, and writing we produce. Each week, a faculty guest speaker will share a recent research project, focusing on the "behind the scenes" stories of the intentions, dilemmas, and choices that informed their research. Together we will read and think critically about the epistemological assumptions behind methodology, the power of method to enable or limit particular kinds of knowledge, and the ethics of socially engaged scholarship. Each student will develop a viable research proposal on a subject of their own choosing, while learning how to be more intentional, creative, and ethical in their own research and writing choices.
Comments: 
Power, Community and Social Justice Independent Work Multiple Cultural Perspectives Writing and Research Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
321270

Course Sections

Ways of Knowing in CSI
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
1 4.0 Kimberly Chang kacSS@hampshire.edu 01:00PM-02:20PM M,W Franklin Patterson Hall 102

SEM:SOC JUSTICE, ENVIRON &CORP

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Sociology
Course Number: 
333
Institution: 
Smith College
Over the last century, the reach of corporations has gradually extended into all facets of our lives, yet most of us rarely stop to think about the corporation as a social entity. This course focuses on the social, economic and legal foundations that both shape its power and provide a dominant logic for its actions. We examine the implications of corporate power and processes for communities, workers and the environment. We also focus on the ways that governments and various social groups have sought to change corporate assumptions and behaviors concerning their social and environmental responsibilities. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and permission of instructor.
Comments: 
Instructor permission. Not open to first-years, sophomores
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Schedule #: 
21428-F16

Course Sections

SEM:SOC JUSTICE, ENVIRON &CORP
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Leslie King lesking@smith.edu T 01:00-02:50 SEELYE 310

S-Community Journalism

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Journalism
Course Number: 
394C
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
The Community Journalism Project is an intermediate reporting class that sends students into ghettos, barrios, and poor white and working class communities of Western Massachusetts. Journalists have become increasingly out of touch with the majority of the population. The working class, the poor, minorities are often overlooked in the mainstream media. This course puts students into the homeless shelters, food pantries, health clinics, community centers, public schools, and low-wage job sites in hope of finding solutions and answers from the real experts. Intensive field work, substantial newswriting, and devotion to reading comprise the calculus of this course.
Comments: 
Open to Senior, Junior and Sophomore Journalism majors only. The Community Journalism Project is a reporting and writing collaboration with the journalism and English students at the High School of Commerce in Springfield. Each week we catch our UMass yellow school bus at noon, travel from the Haigis Mall to Springfield, returning to campus at five.

Since 2008 UMass undergrads have served as mentors and writing coaches at Commerce. This is a hybrid journalism as civics and literacy class that is a reciprocal intellectual exchange between undergrads rich in opportunity and black brown and poor white students rich in insight and intellectual capacity. The high school students share truths that most undergrads have only read about. The undergrads in turn share knowledge and resources only available to students in higher education. Many of these high school students have given up on school because they are bombarded by messages that tell them school has given up on them.

Over the years we have been able to get countless students reengaged with school simply by being available and validating their wisdom as valuable. Undergraduates have been reengaged as well, moving away from the idea of bachelors degree as workforce passport, to a deeper understanding of why journalism is the only profession enshrined in and protected by the US Constitution.

In the process of multimedia storytelling students do what the educational theorist Paulo Freire calls ?intervening in history.? Students realize that exposing facts from ignored sources reveals new truths and increased possibilities.

Dealing with the subject matters of poverty, racism, social inequality, food insecurity, misuse of police authority and institutional racism, while simultaneously telling the stories of hope, resilience and unrecognized intellectualism, our ambition is to move from holding up a mirror to social injustice to an understanding that journalism is a social action in itself, that has the power to make our work in progress democracy into a more perfect union.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
73199

Course Sections

S-Community Journalism
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 3.0 Nicholas Mcbride W 12:00PM 5:00PM

Intro Environmental Health Sci

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Public Health
Course Number: 
203
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological implications relating to human exposures to a variety of environmental contaminants, including air, water, and soil pollution, infectious disease, and occupational environmental health. Recommended (but not required) Prerequisites: Biology 100 and 101 (or Biology 102 or 106 and permission of the instructor) AND Chemistry 111 or 121 and Chemistry 112 (or Chemistry 110 and permission of the instructor)

Recommended (but not required) Prerequisites:
Biology 100 and 101 (or Biology 102 or 106 and permission of the instructor)
AND
Chemistry 111 or 121 and Chemistry 112 (or Chemistry 110 and permission of the instructor)
Comments: 
Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
77262

Course Sections

Intro Environmental Health Sci
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 3.0 Richard Peltier M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

JAPANESE I (INTENSIVE)

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Japanese
Course Number: 
110
Institution: 
Smith College
An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Emphasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, along with reading and writing skills. Students acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no background in Japanese.
Linked Course: 
Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section. To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.
Linked Course Comments: 
You must also register for a Discussion section.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
15745-F16

Course Sections

JAPANESE I (INTENSIVE)
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
02 5.0 MWF 10:00-10:50 SEELYE 107

General Genetics Lab

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Biology
Course Number: 
284
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Various classical and molecular genetic techniques using various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems such as bacteria, yeast, plants, and humans. The lab exercises will be largely inquiry based with a focus on experimental design. Laboratory projects include genetic crosses, analysis of the genotype/phenotype relationship, complementation, linkage mapping, and detection of DNA polymorphisms. Also, bioinformatics tools will be used to perform SNP analysis and analyze sequence similarity.
Comments: 
Open to sophomore and junior Biology majors only. BIOLOGY 151/190H,152/197FH w/C Must be concurrently enrolled in Biology 283 or have previously passed Biol 283 with grade of C or higher.

10 seats reserved for sophomores.

Additional fees are associated with this section.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
80322

Course Sections

General Genetics Lab
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 2.0 Kari Loomis TH 8:15AM 12:15PM

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Anthropology
Course Number: 
135
Institution: 
Smith College
Same as ARC 135. This course studies past cultures and societies through their material remains and explores how archaeologists use different field methods, analytical technique and theoretical approaches to investigate, reconstruct and learn from the past. Data from settlement surveys, site excavations and artifact analysis are used to address economic, social, political and ideological questions across time and space. This course is taught from an anthropological perspective, exploring key transitions in human prehistory, including the origins of food production, social inequality and state-level societies across the globe. Relevance of archaeological practice in modern political, economic and social contexts is explored. Limited to first-year students and sophomores. Enrollment limited to 30.
Comments: 
Limited to first-years, sophomores.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
18952
Schedule #: 
18048-F16

Course Sections

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Elizabeth Klarich eklarich@smith.edu TTh 09:00-10:20 SEELYE 208

KOREAN II

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2016
Subject Name: 
Korean
Course Number: 
201
Institution: 
Smith College
Intermediate Korean I is the first half of a two-semester intermediate course in spoken and written Korean for students who already have a basic knowledge of Korean. This course reinforces and increases students' facility with Korean in the four language areas: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students are encouraged to expand their knowledge and take confidence-inspiring risks through such activities as expanding knowledge of vocabulary, role play in authentic contexts, in-depth study of grammar, students mini-presentations, various types of writing, Korean film reviews, skits and Korean film making. Prerequisite: KOR 102 or permission of the instructor.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
18573-F16

Course Sections

KOREAN II
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Suk Massey smassey@smith.edu MWF 01:10-02:00 SEELYE B4