Polit Econ of Petro-States

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Political Science
Course Number: 
231
Institution: 
Amherst College

[IL] This is a modified version of POSC 232, The Political Economy of Development. The first half of the course is identical to 232, but the second half will have a different focus: the political economy of oil. This section will explore the extent to which oil is a “resource curse,” the neo-structuralist notion that an abundance of a natural resource, in this case oil, is detrimental for development because it distorts economic incentives (away from diversification) and distorts politics (by facilitating corruption, raising the stakes of power-holding, increasing the chance for abuse of state power, and weakening society’s capacity to hold the state accountable). We will examine these hypotheses by focusing on Venezuela, one of the world’s leading oil producers. Until the 1980s, Venezuela was considered an example of democratization. In the 1990s, Venezuela became instead a paradigmatic case of policy incoherence. In the early 2000s, under the Hugo Chávez administration, Venezuela became a case of political polarization, and some argue, rising authoritarianism. The second half of this course will assess whether the resource-curse theory provides the best account of Venezuela’s politics since the 1980s. To address this question, we will: (1) compare the resource-curse argument with other competing theories of development that might account for Venezuelan politics; and (2) compare the Venezuelan case with other cases in Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. This course fulfills requirements for the Five College Certificates in Latin American Studies and International Relations.


Not open to students who have taken POSC 232. Limited to 35 students. Fall semester. Professor Corrales.

Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
POSC-231-01-1415F

Course Sections

Polit Econ of Petro-States
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Javier Corrales jcorrales@amherst.edu W 02:30PM-05:00PM

Food & Eating Disorders

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Psychology
Course Number: 
217
Institution: 
Amherst College

Food shapes our lives in many ways that extend far beyond mere ingestive acts. Through a broad survey of basic and clinical research literature, we will explore how foods and food issues imbue our bodies, minds, and relationships. We will consider biological and psychological perspectives on various aspects of eating such as metabolism, neural mechanisms of hunger and satiety, metabolic disorders, dieting, pica, failure to thrive, starvation, taste preference and aversion, obesity, anxiety and depression relief, food taboos, bulimia, and the anorexias. Strong emphasis will be placed on biological mechanisms and controlled laboratory research with both human and animal subjects.


Requisite: PSYC 100 or 212, or consent of the instructor. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Baird.

Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
PSYC-217-01-1415F

Course Sections

Food & Eating Disorders
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 John-Paul Baird jpbaird@amherst.edu T 09:00AM-11:20AM

SPECIAL STUDIES

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Computer Science
Course Number: 
400
Institution: 
Smith College
For majors, by arrangement with a computer science faculty member.
Comments: 
Permission Instructor/Chair. Not open to first-years
Variable Credit Comments: 
1 to 4 credits
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
Y
Schedule #: 
10139-F14

Course Sections

SPECIAL STUDIES
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
0 0.0

SPECIAL STUDIES

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Religion
Course Number: 
400
Institution: 
Smith College
By permission of the department, normally for senior majors who have had four semester courses above the introductory level.
Comments: 
Permission Instructor/Chair. Limited to REL majors Limited to seniors
Variable Credit Comments: 
2 to 4 credits
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
Y
Schedule #: 
11405-F14

Course Sections

SPECIAL STUDIES
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
0 0.0

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
German Studies
Course Number: 
200
Institution: 
Smith College
A review of basic grammatical concepts and the study of new ones, with emphasis on vocabulary building. An exploration of contemporary German culture through literary and journalistic texts, with regular practice in written and oral expression. Prerequisite: 110y, permission of the instructor, or by placement.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
15111-F14

Course Sections

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
02 4.0 Judith Keyler-Mayer jkeyler@smith.edu MWF 11:00-12:10

INTR ARCHITECTURE:SITE & SPACE

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Art Studio
Course Number: 
283
Institution: 
Smith College
The primary goal of this studio is to engage in discourse about the built environment through the architectural design process. Design is a process of discovery based on personal experience, the joy of exploration, and a spirited intuition. Gaining skills in graphic communication, model making, and design composition, students will produce projects to illustrate their ideas and observations in response to challenging questions about the art and craft of space-making. This course will ask students to take risks, intellectually and creatively, to foster a keener sensitivity to the built environment as something that can be analyzed and manipulated. Prerequisite: one college level art history, architectural history, landscape studies, or architectural design studio course. Note: LSS 250 can substitute for ARS 283 in the Plan C studio art major. A required fee of $75 to cover group supplied materials and/or printing will be charged at the time of registration. Enrollment limited to 24.
Comments: 
Instructor Permission.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
Y
Schedule #: 
15854-F14

Course Sections

INTR ARCHITECTURE:SITE & SPACE
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 TTh 01:00-04:00 HILLYR 106

WESTRN CLASSICS HOMER TO DANTE

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Comparative Literature
Course Number: 
202
Institution: 
Smith College
Same as ENG 202.Texts include the Iliad; tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; Plato's Symposium; Virgil's Aeneid; Dante's Divine Comedy. Lecture and discussion.

CLT 202/ENG 202, like CLT 203/ENG 203, is among the courses from which Comparative Literature majors choose two as the basis of the major. Students interested in Comparative Literature and/or the foundations of Western literature and wanting a writing-intensive course should take 202 or 203, or both.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Crosslisted Section ID: 
16001
Schedule #: 
16608-F14

Course Sections

WESTRN CLASSICS HOMER TO DANTE
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
02 4.0 Maria Banerjee mbanerje@smith.edu TTh 09:00-10:20

Honors Thesis Seminar-1st Sem

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Political Science
Course Number: 
499C
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Not available at this time.
Comments: 
Sr & Jr COMCOL SOCIOL majors Topic: Power & Conflict in International Politics

Students can contact: dpfundstein@polsci.umass.edu
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
Y
Crosslisted Section ID: 
79478
Schedule #: 
79520

Course Sections

Honors Thesis Seminar-1st Sem
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
02 4.0 Dean Robinson TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

SOUTH ASIA: AN INTRODUCTION

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
South Asia Concentration
Course Number: 
140
Institution: 
Smith College
This course introduces students to the study of South Asia, the history of the region, the cultures and cultural productions of South Asia, and the economic, political and religious forces that shape South Asia as well as the impact of South Asian and its diaspora on the contemporary world. It is the gateway course to the South Asia concentration and is required for all concentrators. It is co-taught by all of the Smith faculty associated with the South Asia concentration. Offered first half of the semester only. Graded S/U only. (E)
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
18947-F14

Course Sections

SOUTH ASIA: AN INTRODUCTION
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 1.0 Ambreen Hai ahai@smith.edu M 07:30-09:00

KOR POP CLT:TRANSL TRAD

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
East Asian Studies
Course Number: 
217
Institution: 
Smith College
This course investigates and evaluates contemporary South Korean popular culture and the 21st century cultural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave). It will consider the popularity of the Wave and the backlash against it both in East Asia and globally. It will raise the issue of how film, television, music, manhwa (comic books), sports and the Internet-participate in the transnational production and circulation of culture, identity, modernity, tradition, ideology, and politics. The course aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically think about and understand popular culture.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
19464-F14

Course Sections

KOR POP CLT:TRANSL TRAD
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Jina Kim jkim@smith.edu MW 09:00-10:20