Five College Consortium

Senior Honors

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Biology
Course Number: 
498
Institution: 
Amherst College

Honors students take three courses of thesis research, usually, but not always, with the double course load in the spring. The work consists of seminar programs, individual research projects, and preparation of a thesis on the research project.


Open to seniors. Fall semester. The Department.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
BIOL-498-01-1718F

Course Sections

Senior Honors
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 The Department M 04:00PM-05:00PM MERR 4

Third-Year Russian I

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Russian
Course Number: 
301
Institution: 
Amherst College

This course advances skills in reading, understanding, writing, and speaking Russian, with materials from twentieth-century culture. Readings include fiction by Chekhov, Babel, Olesha, Nabokov, and others. Conducted in Russian, with frequent writing and grammar assignments, in-class presentations, and occasional translation exercises. Two seminar-style meetings and one hour-long discussion section per week.


Requisite: RUSS 202 or consent of instructor. First-year students with strong high school preparation (usually 4 or more years) may be ready for this course. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Rabinowitz and Senior Lecturer Babyonyshev.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
RUSS-301-01-1718F

Course Sections

Third-Year Russian I
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Stanley Rabinowitz, Tatyana Babyonyshev sjrabinowitz@amherst.edu; tbabyonyshev@amherst.edu M 04:30PM-05:45PM; TH 04:15PM-05:45PM CONV 308; CONV 308

Performance

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
German
Course Number: 
360
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as GERM 360, ARCH 360, EUST 360 and FAMS 316) What is performance? What constitutes an event? How can we address a phenomenon that has disappeared the moment we apprehend it? How does memory operate in our critical perception of an event? How does a body make meaning? These are a few of the questions we will explore in this course, as we discuss critical, theoretical, and compositional approaches in a broad range of multidisciplinary performance phenomena emerging from European--primarily German--culture in the twentieth century. We will focus on issues of performativity, composition, conceptualization, dramaturgy, identity construction, representation, space, gender, and dynamism. Readings of performance theory, performance studies, gender studies, and critical/cultural studies, as well as literary, philosophical, and architectural texts, will accompany close examination of performance material. Students will develop performative projects in various media (video, performance, text, online) and deliver a number of critical oral and written presentations on various aspects of the course material and their own projects. Performance material will be experienced live when possible, and in text, video, audio, digital media and online form, drawn from selected works of Dada and Surrealism, Bauhaus, German Expressionism, the Theater of the Absurd, Tanztheater, and Contemporary Theater, Performance, Dance, Opera, New Media, and Performance Art. A number of films, including Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari, Oskar Schlemmer’s Das Triadische Ballett, Fernand Léger’s Ballet Mécanique, and Kurt Jooss’ Der Grüne Tisch, will also be screened.  Conducted in English, with German majors required to do a substantial portion of the reading in German.


Limited to 18 students. Fall semester.  Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
GERM-360-01,ARCH-360-01,EUST-360-01,FAMS-316-01
Schedule #: 
GERM-360-01-1718F

Course Sections

Performance
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Heidi Gilpin hgilpin@amherst.edu W 02:00PM-05:00PM CONV 209

Dem in Mod Latin America

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
History
Course Number: 
263
Institution: 
Amherst College

[LA] Latin Americans began their struggle for democracy during the Independence wars at the start of the nineteenth century. Their struggle continues today. This course considers the historical meanings of democracy in various Latin American countries, with particular attention to the relationship between liberalism and democracy in the nineteenth century; the broadening of democracy at the start of the twentieth century; the rise and fall of military dictatorships in the 1960s-1980s and their impact upon civil society; and the current clashes between neo-Liberal economic programs and the neo-populist resurgence of the left.  Readings and discussions will focus on the ways broad economic and political shifts impacted individuals' lives; how each economic class experienced these shifts differently; the way race and gender have shaped peoples' experience with democratization and repression; and the personal processes of radicalization by which individuals became inspired to take risks in their struggle for inclusion and against repression.  Because the approach is thematic and chronological, some countries and regions will receive more attention than others.  Meetings and readings will draw on secondary studies, historical documents, testimonials, music, images, and film. Two meetings per week.Fall semester.  Professor R. López.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
HIST-263-01-1718F

Course Sections

Dem in Mod Latin America
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Rick Lopez ralopez@amherst.edu TTH 01:00PM-02:20PM CONV 207

Reasons for Belief/Actio

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Philosophy
Course Number: 
469
Institution: 
Amherst College

Your friend wrote a tacky song. Should you believe it's a masterpiece? (She is your friend, after all). You’re about to jump across an icy stream. You’re more likely to make it if you believe you can. Should you believe that? Your resolutions to exercise regularly usually fail. Should you believe you will succeed this time? If we say "yes," what is the relevant sense of "should"? Are these beliefs rational, or merely beneficial? These cases suggest that there can be different sorts of considerations in favor of belief and action. This course is about how to understand these different sorts of reasons and how these might conflict or interact.


This course will be co-taught with Professor Katia Vavova from Mount Holyoke. Half the spaces will be reserved for Amherst College students, and half the spaces will be reserved for Mount Holyoke students.  The overall enrollment cap will be 24 students. The enrollment cap for Amherst College students will be 12.  


Requisites: two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor.  Fall semester.  Professors Shah and Vavova (Mount Holyoke College).

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
PHIL-469-01-1718F

Course Sections

Reasons for Belief/Actio
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Nishiten Shah, Ekaterina Vavova npshah@amherst.edu; evavova@amherst.edu TH 01:00PM-03:30PM WEBS 220

Senior Honors

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Chemistry
Course Number: 
498
Institution: 
Amherst College

A full course.


Open to Senior Honors candidates, and others with consent of the Department. Fall semester. The Department.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
CHEM-498-01-1718F

Course Sections

Senior Honors
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 The Department F 03:15PM-04:30PM MERR 4

Contemporary Art

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Art & the History of Art
Course Number: 
155
Institution: 
Amherst College

This introductory course explores art produced between 1960 and 2016. We will take a transnational approach, from the emergence of Pop art as an international phenomenon in the 1960s to the mushrooming cloud of biennials in the twenty-first century. The course will sometimes look at art’s intersection with architecture, film, and visual culture more broadly. The geopolitical and geo-economic entanglements of both art and art history will never be out of sight. We will keep in mind the following questions: How have new technologies, civil rights movements, emergent subjectivities, new forms of theoretical inquiry, and processes of globalization shaped the work of art? How have artists critiqued both institutions and the art historical canon? How does contemporary art both participate in and stand apart from the world in which and for which it was made?


Limited to 40 students.  Fall semester. Professor Vicario.


 

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ARHA-155-01-1718F

Course Sections

Contemporary Art
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Nicholas Vicario nvicario@amherst.edu MW 12:30PM-01:50PM FAYE 113

Protest!

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Sociology
Course Number: 
325
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as SOCI 325 and ANTH 325)  From Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter and the Women’s March, protests across the globe are questioning the social, political and economic status quo. This course explores the concept and practice of protest from sociological and anthropological perspectives. Why do people protest? What are their cultural and social forms? How does one understand the emotions involved? What is the role of technology? What relationships exist between the act of protest and social movements? Are protests always progressive? How does the study of protest help one understand power, democracy, and societal change? To explore these questions we will look at ethnography and history of collective mobilizations, from anti-colonial movements to nationalist struggles, as well as contemplate the future of protest for the U.S. and the rest of the world. While the readings will include case study research and key theoretical texts, we will also speak with organizers and participants of current uprisings to understand concerns on the ground. 


Limited to 25 students.  Fall semester.  Professors Holleman and Chowdhury.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
SOCI-325-01,ANTH-325-01
Schedule #: 
SOCI-325-01-1718F

Course Sections

Protest!
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 4.0 Nusrat Chowdhury, Hannah Holleman nchowdhury@amherst.edu; hholleman@amherst.edu W 02:00PM-04:30PM FAYE 117

Intro to US Health Care System

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Health Promotion & Policy
Course Number: 
620
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Introduction to the philosophy, nature, and scope of health organizations; administration and organization of governmental health programs, economic and political forces and their effects on health services.
Comments: 
The course is open to Public Health Graduate students only
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
41920

Course Sections

Intro to US Health Care System
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
01 3.0 Lawrence Pellegrini TU 4:00PM 6:30PM

Independent Study

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Anthropology
Course Number: 
396
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Not available at this time
Variable Credit Comments: 
Varies from 1 to 6 credits
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Schedule #: 
33904

Course Sections

Independent Study
Sect # Credits Instructor(s) Instructor Email Meeting Times Location
008 6.0 Linda Ziegenbein 1:00AM 1:00AM