Five College Consortium

Sports Psychology

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Psychology
Course Number: 
235
Institution: 
Amherst College

The field of sports psychology examines psychological variables that impact athletic participation and behavior. This course introduces students to theories and research across diverse areas of psychology, including social, cognitive, developmental, and clinical. Topics will include the role of goals and equity in providing motivation, strategies for successful performance, the use of imagery, attributions for successful versus unsuccessful performance, the predictors of aggression, the causes of the “homefield choke,” effective approaches to coaching, the “hot-hand effect,” the role of personality, the predictors of injury, and the impact of gender on athletics. This course will involve intensive participation in class discussion and many written assignments.


Requisite: PSYC 100 or consent of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 25 students.  Spring semester. Professor Sanderson.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
PSYC-235-01-1718S

Self-Directed Learning

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Psychology
Course Number: 
337SD
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Are children "wired" to be able to learn without direct instruction? Does the process of schooling diminish or enhance our capacity to be self-directed learners? What factors determine one's readiness for self-directed learning, and can self-directed learning be "taught?" What role, if any, do teachers play in self-directed learning? This seminar explores these questions in the context of an ongoing ethnographic study of an alternative education program within a public high school. Participants will have a chance to engage with data from that study and practice qualitative research skills through site visits to schools that encourage self-directed learning.
Variable Credit Comments: 
Interested students should email Professor Grillo during advising week to explain why they want to take this seminar.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Schedule #: 
102932

Lives on the Page

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
English
Course Number: 
311
Institution: 
Amherst College

This course examines the way writers commit their own lives to the page and the many interesting hybrids that, falling somewhere in between fiction and non-fiction, writers have been experimenting with of late.  Why have these hybrid forms become so dominant in the literary world?  How do the assumptions and expectations we bring to fiction differ from those we bring to non-fiction?  Why are forms that play with the relation between these forms so popular right now?  What do they offer us, emotionally and intellectually?  And what can they illuminate about literature, identity, the politics of representation, and social justice?  This course will include a combination of critical and creative writing, and will approach readings on the level of craft so that we are always thinking of ourselves both as readers and as writers.  Possible readings include:  David Vann, Legend of a Suicide; Maggie Nelson, The Argonauts; Jeannette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit and Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?; James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain; Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her; Elena Ferrante, My Brilliant Friend; Karl Ove Knausgaard, My Struggle; Michelle Tea, Black Wave; Beyoncé, Lemonade.


Limited to 25 students.  Spring semester.  Professors Christoff and Frank.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ENGL-311-01-1718S

Gender Sex Modern Europe

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
European Studies
Course Number: 
224
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as EUST 224, HIST 224 [E], and SWAG 224)  In the 1920s and 30s, authoritarian and fascist states across Europe declared that sexuality was not private. Sexual choices in the bedroom, they claimed, shaped national identities and the direction of social and cultural development. Through a variety of programs, propaganda and legal codes, states such as Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy sought to regulate sexual behavior and promote specific gender roles and identities. The intervention of the state in the intimate lives of citizens in the twentieth century, however, was rooted in the transformations of state, culture and economy that took place long before the speeches of great dictators. This course explores the cultural debates surrounding sexual practices, medical theories of gender and sexuality, and the relationship between sexuality and state that shaped European societies in the twentieth century. In case studies from across the continent, the course explores a range of topics, including but not limited to the history of sex reform, prostitution, homosexuality, venereal disease, contraception, abortion, the “New Woman” and sexual emancipation movements, sexual revolutions and reactionary movements and reproductive politics, among others. Students will explore how seemingly self-evident and unchanging categories – feminine and masculine, straight and gay, “normal” and “deviant”– have taken shape and changed over time, and how historical processes (modernization, imperialism, urbanization) and actors (social movements, sex reformers, nationalist groups and states) sought to define and regulate these boundaries in the so-called “century of sex.”  Two class meetings per week.


Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Trask.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
HIST-224-01,EUST-224-01,SWAG-224-01
Schedule #: 
EUST-224-01-1718S

Gender Sex Modern Europe

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
History
Course Number: 
224
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as EUST 224, HIST 224 [E], and SWAG 224)  In the 1920s and 30s, authoritarian and fascist states across Europe declared that sexuality was not private. Sexual choices in the bedroom, they claimed, shaped national identities and the direction of social and cultural development. Through a variety of programs, propaganda and legal codes, states such as Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy sought to regulate sexual behavior and promote specific gender roles and identities. The intervention of the state in the intimate lives of citizens in the twentieth century, however, was rooted in the transformations of state, culture and economy that took place long before the speeches of great dictators. This course explores the cultural debates surrounding sexual practices, medical theories of gender and sexuality, and the relationship between sexuality and state that shaped European societies in the twentieth century. In case studies from across the continent, the course explores a range of topics, including but not limited to the history of sex reform, prostitution, homosexuality, venereal disease, contraception, abortion, the “New Woman” and sexual emancipation movements, sexual revolutions and reactionary movements and reproductive politics, among others. Students will explore how seemingly self-evident and unchanging categories – feminine and masculine, straight and gay, “normal” and “deviant”– have taken shape and changed over time, and how historical processes (modernization, imperialism, urbanization) and actors (social movements, sex reformers, nationalist groups and states) sought to define and regulate these boundaries in the so-called “century of sex.”  Two class meetings per week.


Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Trask.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
HIST-224-01,EUST-224-01,SWAG-224-01
Schedule #: 
HIST-224-01-1718S

Intro to Legal Theory

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Law, Jurisp & Social Thought
Course Number: 
110
Institution: 
Amherst College

This course provides an introduction to the primary texts and central problems of modern legal theory. Through close study of the field’s founding and pivotal works, we will weigh and consider various ways to think about questions that every study, practice, and institution of law eventually encounters. These questions concern law’s very nature or essence; its relations to knowledge, morality, religion, and the passions; the status of its language and interpretations; its relation to force and the threat of force; and its place and function in the preservation and transformation of political, social and economic order.


Limited to 40 students. Spring semester. Professor Sitze.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Schedule #: 
LJST-110-01-1718S

Multivariate Calculus

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Mathematics
Course Number: 
233
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Techniques of calculus in two and three dimensions. Vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals. Honors section available. (Gen.Ed. R2)

[Note: Because this course presupposes knowledge of basic math skills, it will satisfy the R1 requirement upon successful completion.]
Comments: 
Pre Req: MATH 132
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
55869

Second-Year Arabic II

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Arabic
Course Number: 
202
Institution: 
Amherst College

This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. We will complete the study of the Al-Kitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, we will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, you should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. You will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable you to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, you should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. You should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.


Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Five College Lecturer Weinert.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ARAB-202-01-1718S

Group Theory

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Mathematics
Course Number: 
319GT
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Abstract algebra is the study of the common principles that govern computations with seemingly disparate objects. One way to begin is by studying groups, which are sets with a single operation under which each non-identity element is invertible. Examples include the integers with addition, invertible matrices of size n, permutations of a fixed set, and the symmetries of an object. Our goal is to study a definition of groups that unifies all of the important examples above and more.
Comments: 
Prereq: MATH-211 and MATH-232.
Variable Credit Comments: 
This course will satisfy the MATH-311 requirement for the mathematics major.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
103139

Biochemistry Lab

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2018
Subject Name: 
Biochemistry & Biophysics
Course Number: 
331L
Institution: 
Amherst College
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
BIOL-331L-02,CHEM-331L-02,BCBP-331L-02
Schedule #: 
BCBP-331L-02-1718S