Foundations of Af Am Lit

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Black Studies
Course Number: 
232
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as ENGL 275 and BLST 232 [US].)  The focus of this introduction to the study of African American literature and culture will be the complex intertextuality at the heart of the African American expressive tradition.  Tracing some of the tradition’s major formal and thematic concerns means looking for the rhythms and riffs that link different kinds of texts:  literature, film, music, and the spoken word.  While engaging a range of textual experiences, from learning to read silences in narratives of American slavery through coming to understand Afrofuturism and other developments in black speculative fiction, this course will also expose students to a range of analytic and critical production modes that are important to literary and cultural study in general.


Fall semester.  Professor Parham.

Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Crosslisted Section ID: 
ENGL-275-01,BLST-232-01
Schedule #: 
BLST-232-01-1415F

Urban Policy

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Africana Studies
Course Number: 
302
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Gentrification, unemployment, crime, failing schools, disinvestment, mass incarceration--what comes to mind when you think of the inner city? In response to a constrained fiscal environment, cities have increasingly adopted neoliberal policy approaches to address seemingly intractable urban problems. The seminar will study current research to assess the political and economic impact of this neoliberal policy regime on housing, education, and public safety. This is an inter-institutional class, linked with an advanced seminar on the same topic at Holyoke Community College. Both classes will meet together occasionally for films and guest speakers.
Comments: 
Prereq: Politics 250 or 252
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Crosslisted Section ID: 
88784,88622
Schedule #: 
88622

Inorganic Chemistry

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Chemistry
Course Number: 
371
Institution: 
Amherst College

The structure, bonding, and symmetry of transition metal-containing molecules and inorganic solids are discussed. Structure and bonding in transition metal complexes are examined through molecular orbital and ligand field theories, with an emphasis on the magnetic, spectral, and thermodynamic properties of transition metal complexes. Reactions of transition metal complexes, including the unique chemistry of organometallic compounds, will be examined. The laboratory experiments complement lecture material and include a final independent project. Four hours of class and four hours of laboratory per week.


Requisite: CHEM 221 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 24 students. Fall semester.  Professor Ball.

Linked Course: 
Y
Linked Course Comments: 
You must take one section for each of the following coreqs : CHEM-371L,CHEM-371F
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
CHEM-371-01-1415F

Economic Development

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Economics
Course Number: 
213
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
A study of micro-economic development topics related to how households in lower-income countries consume and produce food. Topics include the causes and consequences of hunger and malnutrition, the agricultural household model, household-level food production and demand, intra-household allocation and bargaining, human and social capital investments and their impacts on food production and consumption, land rights and land use, child labor, and risk, credit and insurance markets used by agricultural households.
Comments: 
Prereq: Economics 103, 104, or 110.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
88696

Reading Regions: South

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
English
Course Number: 
159
Institution: 
Amherst College

In the United States, as in many countries, we divide ourselves into regions.  Differences in language and/or dialect, in history, in customs and politics, are often seen as legitimating regional divisions.  The South has always held an especially powerful place in the American imagination, even before the Civil War.  Through close encounters with texts and music, we will explore the differences within the South, the ways in which particular literary texts have come to be seen not just as representing the South but, in part, constituting its difference, and the complex roles played by race, ethnicity, and class.  Among the writers and musicians we will study:  Louis Armstrong, Ernest Gaines, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Breece D.J. Pancake, William Faulkner, Hank Williams, and the Carter Family.


Limited to 15 students.  Fall semester.  Professor Emeritus O'Connell.

Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
ENGL-159-01-1415F

Calculus II

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Mathematics
Course Number: 
202
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Topics include techniques of integration, applications of integration, differential equations, sequences, series, and Taylor series.
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
88763

Traumatic Events

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Film & Media Studies
Course Number: 
370
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as ARCH 363, GERM 363, EUST 363, and FAMS 370.) How is memory constructed and represented? How is it possible to bear witness, and what exactly is involved? Who is authorized to testify, to whom, when? Whose story is it? Is it possible to tell "the story" of a traumatic event? What are the disorders of testimony, and how and where do they emerge? This course will observe the workings of trauma (the enactment and working-through of collective and individual symptoms of trauma), memory, and witnessing in various modes of everyday life. We will examine notions of catastrophe, disaster, accident, and violence, and explore the possibilities and impossibilities of bearing witness in many forms of cultural production: in fiction, poetry, architecture, critical theory, oral and written testimonies, visual art, monuments, memorials, philosophy, science, cartoons, film, video, theater, television reportage, newspaper documentation, performance, online, and in our public and domestic spaces. We will study various representations of trauma, paying particular attention to events in Germany and Europe from the twentieth century, as well as to 9/11 and other recent international events. Material to be examined will be drawn from the work of Pina Bausch, Joseph Beuys, Christian Boltanski, Cathy Caruth, Paul Celan, Marguerite Duras, Peter Eisenman, Shoshana Felman, Florian Freund, Jochen Gerz, Geoffrey Hartman, Rebecca Horn, Marion Kant, Anselm Kiefer, Ruth Klüger, Dominick LaCapra, Claude Lanzmann, Dori Laub, Daniel Libeskind, W.G. Sebald, Art Spiegelman, Paul Virilio, Peter Weiss, Wim Wenders, Elie Wiesel, Christa Wolf, and others. Conducted in English with German majors required to do a substantial portion of the reading in German.


Fall semester. Professor Gilpin.

Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Crosslisted Section ID: 
GERM-363-01,ARCH-363-01,EUST-363-01,FAMS-370-01
Schedule #: 
FAMS-370-01-1415F

Developmental Psychology

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Psychology
Course Number: 
230
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Examines changes in cognitive, social, and emotional functioning, including theory and research that illuminate some central issues in characterizing these changes: the relative contributions of nature and nurture, the influence of the context on development, continuity versus discontinuity in development, and the concept of stage. Includes observations at the Gorse Children's Center at Stonybrook.
Comments: 
Prereq: A 100 level psychology course
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
88804

Artificial Intelligence

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Cognitive Science
Course Number: 
0263
Institution: 
Hampshire College
Artificial Intelligence is a branch of computer science concerned with the development of computer systems that "think." In this course we will explore the core ideas of artificial intelligence through readings, presentations, discussions, and hands-on programming activities. A range of practical artificial intelligence techniques will be covered, and students will complete programming projects to demonstrate engagement with the themes of the course. Prerequisite: One programming course (in any language).
Comments: 
Mind, Brain, and Information Independent Work Quantitative Skills In this course, students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time. This includes time for reading, programming, and project and presentation development.
Linked Course: 
Y
Linked Course Comments: 
This course has unspecified prerequisite(s) - please see the instructor.
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
315146

Intermediate Russian

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2014
Subject Name: 
Russian & Eurasian Studies
Course Number: 
201
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.
Comments: 
Prereq: Russian and Eurasian Studies 111 or 101
Linked Course: 
N
Instructor Permission Required: 
N
Schedule #: 
88832