Five College Consortium

Fictions of Middle Ages

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
English
Course Number: 
334
Institution: 
Amherst College

[before 1800]  What is medieval?  Most people learn very little about the foggy period from 500-1500 that lies between the end of the Classical era and the start of the Renaissance.  What we do learn usually consists of stereotypes.  Such stereotypes include (in no particular order):  jousting, chivalry, repression of women, religious fervor, medical ignorance, lice, Crusades, King Arthur, economic injustice, knights, ladies, and plague.  How are these stereotypes produced and reinforced online?  What is their relationship to historical “fact”?  In each module we will take up texts, objects, and concepts that have constructed and reconstructed our ideas about the Middle Ages in order to learn about the ways objects and texts contribute to alternate (and often competing) views of the past.


The course is divided into three different (yet intersecting) modules:  Maps, Buildings, and Lives.  I have invited some guest speakers who conduct research in different fields to come to our class and push our conversations in interdisciplinary directions.  As we explore these areas, I would like us to think of the ways our materials disrupt and/or confirm popular views of the past.


Fall semester.  Visiting Professor Adams.


 
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ENGL-334-01-1718F

US in Wld: 1898-PRESENT

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
History
Course Number: 
157
Institution: 
Amherst College

[US] This course investigates the United States’ foreign relations in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and seeks to understand why and how it has become increasingly involved in world affairs. Starting with the War of 1898 and closing with the contemporary global war on terrorism, it examines the interplay of domestic and foreign considerations that have defined the “American Century.” This period raises important questions about the nature of American power in relation to traditional empires. The course asks students to think critically about the United States in the context of imperialism and explore how Americans, both in and out of government, sought to reconcile domestic values and identities with the country’s growing global presence. It investigates the ideological, economic, political, social, racial, and security considerations that shaped America’s emergence as a world power and formed the basis of modern American foreign policy and domestic society.  Three class meetings per week.


Limited to 40 students (10 spots reserved for first-year students). Fall semester.  Professor Walker.


 

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
HIST-157-01-1718F

Multivariable Calculus

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Mathematics
Course Number: 
211
Institution: 
Amherst College

Elementary vector calculus; introduction to partial derivatives; multiple integrals in two and three dimensions; line integrals in the plane; Green’s theorem; the Taylor development and extrema of functions of several variables; implicit function theorems; Jacobians. Four class hours per week.


Requisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 121 or placement into MATH 211 or consent of the Department. Limited to 30 students per section. Fall and spring semesters. Professors TBA.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
MATH-211-04-1718F

Reflecting: Intern./Research

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
College(Interdeptmnt) Courses
Course Number: 
211
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Learn to speak with confidence and clarity about your summer internship or research project. Connect it to you academic coursework. What have you learned? How is it useful? What are your next steps? Students will reflect on their experience and collaborate with others to generate useful knowledge. Required for the Nexus but open to all students. For more information, email nexus@mtholyoke.edu.
Variable Credit Comments: 
Class meeting dates: 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, 10/16, 10/23. All students will present at LEAP Symposium on 10/20.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
100483

Intro Native Amer Studies

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0163
Institution: 
Hampshire College
"Everything you know about Indians is wrong."- Paul Chaat Smith. This interdisciplinary course offers an introduction to important topics in the field of Native American Studies. We will examine history, literature, art, politics, and current events to explore the complex relationship between historical and contemporary issues that indigenous peoples face in North America, with a focus on the United States. We will pay particular attention to the creative ways that indigenous communities have remained vibrant in the face of ongoing colonial struggle. Topics include histories of Indian-settler relations, American Indian sovereignty, Indigenous ecological knowledge practices, American Indian philosophical and literary traditions, and American Indian activism.
Comments: 
Culture, Humanities, and Languages Multiple Cultural Perspectives Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
324478

Costume Design

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Theater
Course Number: 
362
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Accessible to all students who have completed Theater 160. Students gain basic knowledge in Costume Design, including but not limited to: script analysis, professional research technique, visual communication (especially drawing), and build on experiences from Theater 160 with hands-on work in the costume shop. A student coming to 362 with more advanced design, drawing or construction skills can expect to build on and enhance those skills.
Comments: 
Open to Theater majors only. Pre Req: THEATER 160
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
41881

Intro Ideas/Applic Statistics

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Statistics
Course Number: 
140
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
This course provides an overview of statistical methods, their conceptual underpinnings, and their use in various settings taken from current news, as well as from the physical, biological, and social sciences. Topics will include exploring distributions and relationships, planning for data production, sampling distributions, basic ideas of inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis tests), inference for distributions, and inference for relationships, including chi-square methods for two-way tables and regression.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
100584

Theory II Lab

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Music
Course Number: 
232L
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Comments: 
Coreq: MUSIC-232.
Linked Course: 
Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section. To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
100667

Stars and Galaxies

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Astronomy
Course Number: 
100
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Discover how the forces of nature shape our understanding of the cosmos. Explore the origin, structure, and evolution of the earth, moons and planets, comets and asteroids, the sun and other stars, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the universe as a whole.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
100755

Anthropology of Modern Japan

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Anthropology
Course Number: 
204
Institution: 
Mount Holyoke College
Since the mid-nineteenth century, Americans have viewed Japan as the Orient's most exotic and mysterious recess, alternately enticing and frightening in its difference. Intense economic relations and cultural exchange between Japan and the U.S. have not dispelled the image of Japanese society and culture as fundamentally different from our own. In this course, we will strive for greater understanding of shared experiences as well as historical particularities. Issues covered may vary from one semester to another, but frequently focus on work, women, minorities, and popular culture. Films and anthropological works provide ethnographic examples of some key concepts.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
100952