Five College Consortium

Modern Political Thought

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Political Science
Course Number: 
245
Institution: 
Amherst College

[PT] Modernity – the age of individualism, increasing social autonomy, and political self-determination – was an era of enormous progression and novelty in political thinking. In it we find new conceptions of political rationality and affect (how to think and feel about politics), as well as reconceptualizations of such key concepts as equality and liberty, the state and civil society. These changes held much promise, shaping institutions that seemed destined to improve economic and social conditions for rapidly increasing populations. Yet the politics that ensued from this "modern" thinking sometimes proved disastrous: The 20th century – once thought to fulfill the promise of modernity – has been the most violent in history. This course surveys the development of political concepts in modern Western thought. We will trace paradigmatic shifts in political ideas as they begin to surface in 17th- and 18th-century European thought, evidenced in the writings of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant, amongst others. And we will compare these ideas with the thinking of some prominent 19th- and 20th-century critics, including Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, and Schmitt. Through close textual readings and contextual analysis we will engage in a systematic comparison of our assumptions about politics with those expressed in these philosophical debates. And, in so doing, we will attempt to further our understanding of contemporary politics and the problems requisite to our own political practices.


Requisite:  One course in POSC or LJST.  Spring semester.  Professor Poe.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
POSC-245-01-1617S

What Is Religion?

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Religion
Course Number: 
210
Institution: 
Amherst College
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
RELI-210-01-1617S

Spanish III

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Spanish
Course Number: 
125
Institution: 
Amherst College

SPAN 125 is a continuation of SPAN 120. 120 and 125 are a two-semester sequence. Students who take SPAN 120 will need to complete SPAN 125 before moving on to SPAN 130.  This course will expand Spanish language skills with exercises in conversation, oral comprehension and composition, based on cultural readings.


Students will gain command of expressing plans, doubts, and probability, and feelings (wishes, happiness, anger, surprise, fear, etc.). Reciprocal verbs, various subjunctive phrases using quizás, tal vez, probablemente, ojalá, etc., as well as subjunctive formations using subordinate noun clauses will be introduced. Finally, students will begin to learn how to express and justify their opinions and to argue them appropriately. This course focuses on the development of oral fluency and vocabulary.


This course prepares students for Spanish IV (SPAN 130). Three hours per week with the lecturer, plus one hour with the language assistant. Limited to 15 students per section. This course may not be counted toward the Spanish Major. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.


Requisite: Spanish II (SPAN 120) or Spanish Placement Exam. Fall and spring semesters. Lecturer Bel and Assistants.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
SPAN-125-01-1617S

Don Quixote

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Spanish
Course Number: 
364
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as SPAN 364 [RC] and EUST 264.) A patient, careful reading of Cervantes' masterpiece (published in 1605 and 1615), taking into consideration the biographical, historical, social, religious, and literary context from which it emerged during the Renaissance.  The discussion will center on the novel's structure, style, and durability as a classic and its impact on our understanding of ideas and emotions connected with the Enlightenment and its aftermath.  Authors discussed in connection to the material include Erasmus of Rotterdam, Montaigne, Emerson, Tobias Smollett, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Unamuno, Nabokov, Borges, García Márquez, and Rushdie. Conducted in Spanish.


Requisite: SPAN 199, 211 or 212 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Stavans.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
SPAN-364-01,EUST-264-01
Schedule #: 
SPAN-364-01-1617S

Women/Art Early Mod Eur

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Sexuality Wmn's & Gndr Studies
Course Number: 
206
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as ARHA 284, EUST 284, and SWAG 206.) This course will examine the ways in which prevailing ideas about women and gender-shaped visual imagery, and how these images influenced ideas concerning women from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. It will adopt a comparative perspective, both by identifying regional differences among European nations and tracing changes over time. In addition to considering patronage of art by women and works by women artists, we will look at the depiction of women heroes such as Judith; the portrayal of women rulers, including Elizabeth I and Marie de' Medici; and the imagery of rape. Topics emerging from these categories of art include biological theories about women; humanist defenses of women; the relationship between the exercise of political power and sexuality; differing attitudes toward women in Catholic and Protestant art; and feminine ideals of beauty.


Limited to 15 students. Spring semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
ARHA-284-01,EUST-284-01,SWAG-206-01
Schedule #: 
SWAG-206-01-1617S

WWII & Japanese American

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
American Studies
Course Number: 
374
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as AMST 374 and HIST 374 [US]).  In the largest incidence of forced removal in American history, the U.S. incarcerated 120,000 people of Japanese descent during WWII, two-thirds of whom were American citizens. Preceded by half a century of organized racism, the attack on Pearl Harbor provided justification for imprisonment of an entire ethnic group solely on the basis of affiliation by “blood.” At the same time, Japanese Americans served in the U.S. military with extraordinary distinction, earning recognition in the 100th Battalion/442nd Regimental Combat Team in Europe as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in American military history. Thousands more served in the Military Intelligence Service using their knowledge of the Japanese language as a “secret weapon” against the Japanese Empire. We will examine the historical background leading to these events and Japanese American resistance to official actions including the cases of Yasui, Hirabayashi, Korematsu, and Endo which reached the U.S. Supreme Court. We will also explore the imposition of the draft upon men behind barbed wire and those who became draft resisters. We will also trace the post-war rise of movements to gain redress, successful with President Reagan’s signing of HR 442 in 1988, and the extraordinary rise of memorials and museums commemorating incarceration and memory-making.


Limited to 18 students.  Spring semester.  McCloy Visiting Professor Odo.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
AMST-374-01,HIST-374-01
Schedule #: 
AMST-374-01-1617S

Second-Year Arabic II

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Arabic
Course Number: 
202
Institution: 
Amherst College

This is a continuation of Second-Year Arabic I. We will complete the study of the Al-Kitaab II book sequence along with additional instructional materials. In this course, we will continue perfecting knowledge of Arabic integrating the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of this semester, you should have sufficient comprehension in Arabic to understand most routine social demands and most non-technical real-life conversations as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to particular interests and special fields of competence in a general professional proficiency level. You will have broad enough vocabulary that will enable you to read within a normal range of speed with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic prose material and be able to write about similar topics. Also by the end of this semester, you should have a wide range of communicative language ability including grammatical knowledge, discourse knowledge and sociolinguistic knowledge of the Arabic language. You should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and video materials and websites. Exercises and activities include essay writing, social interactions, role plays and in-class conversations, oral and video presentations that cover the interplay of language and culture, extra-curricular activities and a final project.


Requisite: ARAB 201 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Limited to 18 students. Spring semester.  Five College Lecturer Razeq.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ARAB-202-01-1617S

Foundations/Integrations

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Art & the History of Art
Course Number: 
272
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as ENGL 281, FAMS 220, and ARHA 272.)  “Foundations and Integrations” will be an annual team-taught course between a Critical Studies scholar and moving-image artist.  A requirement of the Film and Media Studies major, it will build on critical analysis of moving images and introductory production work to develop an integrated critical and creative practice.  Focused in particular around themes and concepts, students will develop ideas in both written and visual form.  The theme for spring 2017 will be “The Voice.”


Requisites:  A foundations course in Critical Studies of Film and Media (such as “Coming to Terms: Cinema”) and an introductory film/video production workshop. Not open to first-year students.  Limited to 15 students.  Spring semester.  Professors Levine and Rangan.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
ENGL-281-01,ARHA-272-01,FAMS-220-01
Schedule #: 
ARHA-272-01-1617S

Words, Self, and Society

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Asian Languages & Civilization
Course Number: 
233
Institution: 
Amherst College

[J] In the past two and a half centuries, Japan has experienced vertiginous transformations, including the rise of a money economy, the encounter with the West, rapid modernization, imperial expansion, war, defeat, democratization, and its postwar reemergence as a technological and economic superpower. This course will examine how literature has both reflected and responded to these disorienting changes. We will focus on how varied social, historical, and aesthetic contexts contribute to the pendulum swings among artistic positions: the belief that literature has an important role to play in the exploration of the relationship between society and the individual; the fascination with the very materials of artistic creation and the concomitant belief that literature can only ever be about itself; and the urgent yet paradoxical attempt, in the writing of traumas such as the atomic bombings, to capture experiences that may be beyond representation. This course assumes no prior knowledge of Japan or Japanese, and all texts are taught using English translations.


Spring semester.  Professor Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
ASLC-233-01-1617S

Structural Biochem Dis

Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Biochemistry & Biophysics
Course Number: 
310F
Institution: 
Amherst College
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
BIOL-310F-01,BCBP-310F-01
Schedule #: 
BCBP-310F-01-1617S