Five College Consortium

Digital Culture

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Comparative Literature
Course Number: 
236
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
An introduction to digital culture, including study of actual works of art in their new digital forms and the implications of "hypertext" for creative writing, theory, and criticism. Potential for academic research on the Internet, the World Wide Web, and electronic libraries. (Gen.Ed. I)
Comments: 
Gen Ed I
An introduction to digital culture, including study of actual works of art in their new digital forms and the implications of "hypertext" for creative writing, theory, and criticism. Potential for academic research on the Internet, the World Wide Web, and electronic libraries.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
30744

CASE STUDIES INTL RELATIONS

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Government
Course Number: 
250
Institution: 
Smith College
Relations among the major world powers - the U.S., Europe, China, Russia, Japan - have been relatively stable since the end of the Cold War but recently have turned more fractious, a result, in part, of growing assertiveness on the part of China and Russia.  How to respond to these states has become a major concern for American policymakers, with some favoring a more combative approach to one or another (or both) and some a more cooperative stance.  This course will analyze the stresses in contemporary great-power relations and asses contending options for addressing them, with a particular emphasis on potential flashpoints that could provoke crisis and conflict, such as Ukraine and the South China Sea.  Students will be expected to examine the big picture of great-power relations and to study one problem in considerable depth. 
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
11006-F17

Functional Japanese

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Japanese
Course Number: 
201
Institution: 
Amherst College

The course will emphasize active learning from each student in the class by the use of the materials on the course website and individual or small group discussions with the instructor. By the end of this course, students are expected to be able to use multiple Japanese structures with a substantial vocabulary and to have attained post-elementary speaking, listening, reading, and writing proficiency levels. As for literacy, a few hundred new characters (Kanji) will be added by reading and writing longer passages. Small groups based on the students’ proficiency levels will be formed, so that instruction accords with the needs of each group. Students will be required to practice with the materials that are on the course website at the college. 


Requisite: JAPA 103 or equivalent. Fall and spring semesters. Senior Lecturer Kayama and Professor Tawa.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
JAPA-201-01-1718F

Adv Reading/Latin Poetry

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Latin
Course Number: 
441
Institution: 
Amherst College

The authors read in LATI 441 and 442 vary from year to year, the selection being made according to the interests and needs of the students. Both 441 and 442 may be repeated for credit, providing only that the topic is not the same. In 2017-17 LATI 441 will read Apuleius and Petronius. Three class hours per week. Seminar course.  


Requisite: LATI 215 or 316 or equivalent.  Fall semester. Professor Olsen.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
LATI-441-01-1718F

Biochemical Principles

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Chemistry
Course Number: 
330
Institution: 
Amherst College

(Offered as CHEM 330 and BIOL 330) What are the molecular underpinnings of processes central to life?  We will explore the chemical and structural properties of biological molecules and learn the logic used by the cell to build complex structures from a few basic raw materials. Some of these complex structures have evolved to catalyze chemical reactions with enormous degree of selectivity and specificity, and we seek to discover these enzymatic strategies. We will consider the detailed balance sheet that shows how living things harvest energy from their environment to fuel metabolic processes and to reproduce and grow.  Examples of the exquisite control that permits a cell to be responsive and adapt its responses based on input from the environment will be considered.  We will also consider some of the means by which cells respond to change and to stress.  A student may not receive credit for both CHEM 330 and BCBP/BIOL/CHEM 331.


Requisite:  BIOL 191 and CHEM  221.  Limited to 40 students with 20 students per discussion section.  Fall semester.  Professor O'Hara and Professor TBA.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
CHEM-330-01,BIOL-330-01
Schedule #: 
CHEM-330-01-1718F

Geopolitics & U.S. Policy

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Political Science
Course Number: 
214
Institution: 
Amherst College

[G, IL] The goal in this course is to examine the geopolitics which lies at the intersection of international relations and foreign policy. But what is geopolitics and why is it as often berated as it is embraced by American politicians and policy elites alike? Over the past two centuries, what part has geopolitics played in the currents of world politics and in the conduct of American foreign policy? What role has geopolitics played in the post-Cold War era, after the demise of the Soviet Union and the ostensible triumph of liberal capitalism? Using the methods of diplomatic history and political science, this course will explore critical moments and themes in American foreign policy.  Our overall aim is to better understand today’s position of the United States in world politics as well as present domestic controversies over the character of America’s global role. This is also a period which has been characterized by growing tension between two sets of political power dynamics: one is dominated by a territorial logic of power that has as its basis the direct control of specific territory, people and resources; the other is dominated by a more diffuse logic of power that derives from the command of “de-territorialized” global political, economic, technological and cultural forces which emanate from states as well as stateless groups with a global and transnational reach. In an attempt to better understand world politics in the age of America’s preponderance, the course will ultimately examine how American presidents have understood and navigated between these two sets of political power dynamics in articulating and conducting foreign policy, and how the American public and elites have facilitated or complicated this task.


Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Professor Machala and Emeritus Professor Levin.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
POSC-214-01,HIST-215-01
Schedule #: 
POSC-214-01-1718F

Metaphysics

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Philosophy
Course Number: 
332
Institution: 
Amherst College

Metaphysics is the investigation, at the most fundamental level, of the nature of reality. It has been an especially vibrant area of philosophy in recent years, and we will read some of the freshest and most important work in the field. Among the questions to be considered are: What is existence? Is there more than one kind of existence? Are there merely possible things? Could you have been a poached egg (Tichy)? What is possibility anyway? Can things really change, or do they last for no more than a moment, or both? When are several things parts of some greater whole, and why? Is a statue identical to the lump of clay from which it is fashioned? How can you destroy the statue, yet not destroy the clay? Thinking through such basic questions leads to surprising perplexities and surprising insights. Readings by Quine, Kripke, Lewis, Van Inwagen, and others. 


Requisite: One course in philosophy. Limited to 25 students. Fall semester. Visiting Professor Emeritus Westphal.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
PHIL-332-01-1718F

Lie Algebras

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Mathematics
Course Number: 
405
Institution: 
Amherst College

Lie algebras originally arose as a way of studying certain continuous transformation groups called Lie groups. Lie algebras are simpler objects than Lie groups since they can be studied using tools from linear algebra, yet they still provide a lot of information about their associated Lie groups. This class serves as a first introduction to the theory of Lie algebras. We will examine the structure of finite dimensional Lie algebras, ideals and homomorphisms, nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras, Cartan subalgebras, semisimplicity, root systems, and the classification of semisimple Lie algebras. This classification is not only a fundamental result in Lie Theory, but is also an archetype of classifications that appear in other areas of math. More amazingly, this classification is embodied in simple combinatorial pictures called Dynkin diagrams, which underlie surprisingly disparate fields, such as geometric group theory, quiver representation theory, and string theory.


Requisite: MATH 350 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 18 students. Fall semester. Visiting Professor Naqvi.

Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
MATH-405-01-1718F

Good&Evil:East-West

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Comparative Literature
Course Number: 
141
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
This course will explore the concepts of Good and Evil as expressed in philosophical and theological texts and in their imaginative representation in literature, film and television, photography, and other forms of popular media. Cross-cultural perspectives and approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith and spirituality will be considered. A range of historical and contemporary events and controversies will be discussed in relation to these issues including immigration, war, gender and sexuality, and new technologies. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
30672

International Short Story

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2017
Subject Name: 
Comparative Literature
Course Number: 
121
Institution: 
UMass Amherst
Russian, Czech, German, French, Italian, Spanish, English, American, and Latin-American stories from Romanticism to the present. Fantastic tales, character sketches, surprise endings; main types of the short story. (Gen.Ed. AL)
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
30708