Media and the Middle East

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0279
Institution: 
Hampshire College
The global media landscape has undergone significant changes in just over a decade. In this course we will examine how US and international media sources are covering the Middle East. Some questions we will explore are: how did US entertainment and news media respond to the attacks of 9/11? How do US media represent the daily lives and political struggles of Arabs and Muslims? What has been the political and social impact of Middle East-based channels with a global reach like Al Jazeera? How have new media influenced social movements as well as perceptions of historical events such as the Arab Uprisings? The course will feature guest speakers, film screenings, and student presentations. Students will be expected to keep up with a heavy reading load and to develop individualized research projects.
Comments: 
Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Crosslisted Section ID: 
318343,318262
Schedule #: 
318343

INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Film Studies
Course Number: 
150
Institution: 
Smith College
This course offers an overview of cinema as an artistic, industrial, ideological and social force. Students become familiar with the aesthetic elements of cinema (visual style, editing, cinematography, sound, performance, narration and formal structure, etc.), the terminology of film production, and the relations among industrial, ideological, artistic and social issues. Films (both classic and contemporary, mainstream and experimental) are discussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, enabling students to approach films as informed and critical viewers. Enrollment limited to 60. Priority given to Smith College film studies minors and Five College film studies majors.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
18916-F15

INTRO STATS & ECONOMETRICS

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Economics
Course Number: 
220
Institution: 
Smith College
Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, probability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software and micro computers to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or ECO 153. Students are not given credit for both ECO 220 and any of the following courses: GOV 190, SOC 201, MTH 201, PSY 201 MTH 220. Course limited to 55 students.
Linked Course: 
Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section. To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.
Linked Course Comments: 
You must also register for a Lecture section.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
19440-F15

PHYS COND: FITNESS SAMPLER

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Exercise and Sport Studies
Course Number: 
945
Institution: 
Smith College
Sectioned course. A complete fitness course composed of a wide variety of aerobic and anaerobic activities. Upon completion of this course, students should possess the skills and knowledge to design their own fitness program. Strong emphasis on multiple forms of activity and adjusted to individual needs. Enrollment limited to 14.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
13288-F15

Reading, Writing, Citizenship

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0248
Institution: 
Hampshire College
The fight for equity in education is one of the most critical and enduring themes in the African American struggle to fully exercise their citizenship rights. This course will explore the ways in which local African American communities fought to create educational spaces for their children and for future generations. The class will begin with the dynamic struggle of Boston's African American community to desegregate public education during the pre-civil war decade and trace the varied strategies of educational leaders to broaden educational opportunities through the Reconstruction, Jim Crow and Civil Rights/Black Power eras. Readings will uncover hidden strategies for strengthening the academic programs in segregated Black schools, and increasing access to secondary and post secondary education available to Black students. The second half of the course will explore more overt strategies for educational advancement, such as the student led boycotts of the 1950s and 1960s and local campaigns history as well as primary sources, students will begin to identify specific research questions and develop their own research agenda. This course will require students to become familiar with resource materials found in the library research databases and in the W.E.B. Dubois Special Collection located at UMASS.
Comments: 
Power, Community and Social Justice Multiple Cultural Perspectives Writing and Research Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
318441

Contemporary Soc. Movements

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0224
Institution: 
Hampshire College
This course offers students the chance to explore the diversity of grassroots politics, social movements, and alternative democratic practices within contemporary Latin America. The course will first introduce students to various theoretical frameworks to understand social movements. It will then focus on a rigorous comparative analysis of contemporary Latin American social movements oriented towards different political issues. We will examine a broad array of social movements across the region and pay particular attention to how their seemingly different pursuits for social justice are inter-related.
Comments: 
Power, Community and Social Justice Multiple Cultural Perspectives Independent Work Writing and Research Students are expected to spend at least six to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
318322

INTRO STATS & ECONOMETRICS

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Economics
Course Number: 
220
Institution: 
Smith College
Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Topics include elementary sampling, probability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Assignments include use of statistical software and micro computers to analyze labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: ECO 150 or ECO 153. Students are not given credit for both ECO 220 and any of the following courses: GOV 190, SOC 201, MTH 201, PSY 201 MTH 220. Course limited to 55 students.
Linked Course: 
Multiple required components--lab and/or discussion section. To register, submit requests for all components simultaneously.
Linked Course Comments: 
You must also register for a Lecture section.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
19441-F15

INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Economics
Course Number: 
150
Institution: 
Smith College
How and how well do markets work? What should government do in a market economy? How do markets set prices, determine what is produced and decide who gets the goods? We consider important economic issues including preserving the environment, free trade, taxation, (de)regulation and poverty.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
14156-F15

The American Transcendentalist

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Humanities Arts Cultural Stu
Course Number: 
0245
Institution: 
Hampshire College
The American Transcendentalists: Even in its heyday in the 1830's and 40's, the Transcendentalist movement never included more than a few dozen vocal supporters, but it fostered several significant cultural precedents, including a couple of America's first utopian communities (Brook Farm and Fruitlands), an early women's rights manifesto (Fuller's Woman in the Nineteenth Century), the first enthusiastic appropriation of Asian religious ideas, and, in the travel writings of Thoreau, the nation's earliest influential environmentalism. The Transcendentalists also produced some of the richest and most original literature of the nineteenth century. The purpose of this course is two-fold: to explore in depth the principal writings of the Transcendentalists in their distinctive literary, religious, and historical settings; and to examine these texts reflexively for what they may say to us today. While sampling other writings of the period, we will read extensively in the work of three premier literary and cultural figures: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau. In addition, during the last two weeks of the semester, we will consider selected poetry and prose of the belated Transcendentalist from New York City, Walt Whitman.
Comments: 
Writing and Research Multiple Cultural Perspectives Independent Work Students are expected to spend 8 hours weekly in preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
318215

China Rising

Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2015
Subject Name: 
Critical Social Inquiry
Course Number: 
0187
Institution: 
Hampshire College
China Rising: Reorienting the 21st Century: After a brief overview of the Maoist era, this course will examine the rapid economic, political, and social changes that have swept China in the last three decades. We will examine major issues in China's astonishingly rapid transformation from an agrarian to an industrial society (e.g. escalating inequalities, the emergence of a large migrant underclass, the crisis of rural social welfare and health care, the spread of AIDS, looming environmental crises, increasingly skewed sex ratios due to population policies) alongside the reduction of poverty, increasing freedoms, the rise of a middle class, and the emergence of consumerism as a cultural ideology. The treatment of ethnic minorities and the possibilities for a democratic transition will be considered and debated. At the end of the course we will consider the impact of China's international rise as an economic power and energy consumer on US-China relations as China challenges US global dominance. Please note that there will be film screenings on most Monday evenings 7:00-9:00 from September to early November. If you have a time conflict with any of the Monday screening times, alternative arrangements can be made for you to see the film.
Comments: 
Power, Community and Social Justice Independent Work Multiple Cultural Perspectives Writing and Research Students are expected to spend at least seven to eight hours a week of preparation and work outside of class time.
Instructor Permission: 
Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.
Schedule #: 
318317