Five College Consortium

Five College Women's Studies Research Center

Spring 2018 Events


Ongoing

FCWSRC Weekly Faculty Write-on-Site

The FCWSRC will be holding a regular Write-on-Site every Wednesday from 11am-1pm. For more information, email jhamilton@hampshire.edu

Wednesdays, 11:00am-1:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College                                                                                                                           

Wednesday, February 28th 

FCWSRC Works in Progress Seminar for Faculty

“Teamwork to Make the Dream Work: Networks of Opportunity and Mistrust as Tactical Tool"

Teresa Gonzales, FCWSRC Research Associate and Assistant Professor of Sociology, Knox College

Much of the literature on community development emphasizes the importance of cultivating trust in order to build interorganizational networks within poor communities. We know trust relationships may bring additional funds and political influence to a neighborhood, but at what cost? Particularly if power is consolidated into the hands of the few. If trust can increase marginalization, how might mistrust create opportunities? Using a case study of two low-income neighborhoods in Chicago, Little Village and Greater Englewood, Gonzales focuses on the ways that neighborhood-based community groups use mistrust as a strategy for local power. The larger study focuses on the Local Initiative Support Corporation/Chicago’s (LISC/Chicago) New Communities’ Program (NCP) in Chicago.

In the chapter being presented, Gonzales argues that organizational mistrust, in particular, is a valuable tool against continued neighborhood exploitation, helps to create and set work boundaries, and can decrease social cohesion (and socialization) between organizations with disparate access to power. Although there was a high level of mistrust between organizations, certain groups still collaborated, and shared information, resources, and ideas. These collaborative relationships – what Gonzales terms networks of opportunity – provide greater benefits to both community organizations and local residents. This approach to networking, while potentially time-consuming and difficult, allows for organizations to connect their local causes to broader national issues, and is particularly useful in networks that contain unequal power relations. 

Discussants: Hannah Holleman (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Amherst College), Caroline Melly (Associate Professor of Anthropology, Smith College), and Ellen Pader (Associate Professor of Regional Planning, UMass Amherst)

**Dinner provided - RSVP required**

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Wednesday, March 7th 

"The Search for an Inclusive and Just Global Economy: Why Women Peasants, Artisans and Traders Matter" 

Public Talk by Mary Njeri Kinyanjui, FCWSRC Research Associate and Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi

While it is difficult to pinpoint when the global economy was initiated, many critics are quick to point out how Africa is a burden or a problem to be solved by developed world economies. In the words of Giugale Marcelo, Africa is the "last frontier" which needs to be incorporated into the global economy through economic development or its "economies of affection" need to be captured, according to Goran Hyden. These individuals to be incorporated or captured include women peasants, artisans and traders who have survived into the 21st century doing their "own thing" which looks strange to many analysts. In this talk, Kinyanjui interrogates four issues: why the women peasants, artisans and traders have survived into the 21st century; the economic models which they have crafted for their survival against the imperialistic global economy penetration; why these models matters to the global economy; and why there is a need to shift the current global economic engagments of women peasants, artisans and traders to realize an inclusive and just global economy.

**Dinner provided - RSVP required**

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Wednesday, March 21st 

Book Salon with Pooja Rangan on Immediations: The Humanitarian Impulse in Documentary

Join us for a discussion of Immediations: The Humanitarian Impulse in Documentary (Duke University Press) by Pooja Rangan (Assistant Professor of English in Film and Media Studies, Amherst College).

Endangered life is often used to justify humanitarian media intervention, but what if suffering humanity is both the fuel and outcome of such media representations? Pooja Rangan argues that this vicious circle is the result of immediation, a prevailing documentary ethos that seeks to render human suffering urgent and immediate at all costs. Rangan interrogates this ethos in films seeking to “give a voice to the voiceless,” an established method of validating the humanity of marginalized subjects, including children, refugees, autistics, and animals. 

Discussants: Jennifer Bajorek (Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, Hampshire College), Amy Cox Hall (Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Amherst College), Jina Kim (Mount Holyoke Fellow/Visiting Lecturer in Critical Social Thought and Assistant Professor of English and the Study of Women and Gender, Smith College) and Bernadine Mellis (Five College Senior Lecturer in Film & Video Production)  

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Monday, March 26th 

FCWSRC Works in Progress Seminar for Faculty

"‘Your Nostalgia is Killing Me!’: ACT UP Nostalgia, Historical Narratives, and their Meaning in the Present”

Marika Cifor, Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow, Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies Program, Bowdoin College

At this juncture nostalgia for ACT UP’s brand of visual, theatrical, and communal direct action abounds. Taking as a case the 2013 poster, “Your Nostalgia is Killing Me!" Marika Cifor analyzes the complicated and conflicted contemporary nostalgia for ACT UP’s radical queer politics, sense of community, and aesthetics. The poster features archival images of ACT UP actions amongst other now-iconic visuals of queer activism and AIDS cultural production. It sparked heated critical conversations between multiple generations of AIDS activists that extended from social media to the halls of the New York Public Library, and which foreground the fraught legacies of ACT UP/New York and of the AIDS crisis. Cifor argue that considering how quotidian aspects of daily life were affected by both HIV/AIDS and the activism created in response to it is crucial in understanding the desire for a collectively imagined, more socially engaged and communal past. The affective drag of nostalgia for ACT UP does not mean that anyone actually wants to revive or relive the death, discrimination, and mass destruction that marked the height of the AIDS crisis in the United States. However, the queer temporal practice of nostalgia for ACT UP’s brand of direct action AIDS activism, both on the part of those who participated and by younger generations who did not, has become a common language through which people express their disappointments and frustrations with the shortcomings of attention to AIDS and with LGBTQ politics and activism.

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Friday, March 30th

Pioneer Valley Bread House Gathering

Join others in a community bread-baking with the Pioneer Valley Bread House facilitated by Leda Cooks, Professor in the Department of Communication at UMass Amherst. 

4:30-6:30pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Monday, April 2nd 

Book Salon with Laura Furlan on Indigenous Cities: Urban Indian Fiction and the Histories of Relocation

Join us for a discussion of Indigenous Cities: Urban Indian Fiction and the Histories of Relocation (University of Nebraska Press) by Laura Furlan (Assistant Professor of English, UMass Amherst).

In Indigenous Cities Laura Furlan demonstrates that stories of the urban experience are essential to an understanding of modern Indigeneity. She situates Native identity among theories of diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and transnationalism by examining urban narratives—such as those written by Sherman Alexie, Janet Campbell Hale, Louise Erdrich, and Susan Power—along with the work of filmmakers and artists. In these stories Native peoples navigate new surroundings, find and reformulate community, and maintain and redefine Indian identity in the postrelocation era. These narratives illuminate the changing relationship between urban Indigenous peoples and their tribal nations and territories and the ways in which new cosmopolitan bonds both reshape and are interpreted by tribal identities.

Discussants: Christine DeLucia (Assistant Professor of History, Mount Holyoke College), Laura Doyle (Professor of English, UMass Amherst), Laura Fugikawa (Visiting Assistant Professor in the Study of Women and Gender and English Language and Literatures, Smith College), and Kiara Vigil (Assistant Professor of American Studies, Amherst College)

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Thursday, April 5th 

Embodying Coalitions Across the Worlds of Postcolonial and Decolonial Scholarship and Practice - Faculty Reading Group 

Discussion will be on Feminist Studies Vol 43, Issue 3 on Decolonial and Postcolonial Feminisms.

**RSVP to nroubini@mtholyoke.edu**

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Wednesday, April 18th 

Book Salon with Amy Cox Hall on Framing a Lost City: Science, Photography and the Making of Machu Picchu

Join us for a discussion of Framing a Lost City: Science, Photography and the Making of Machu Picchu (University of Texas Press) by Amy Cox Hall (FCWSRC Research Associate and Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Amherst College).

When Hiram Bingham, a historian from Yale University, first saw Machu Picchu in 1911, it was a ruin obscured by overgrowth whose terraces were farmed a by few families. A century later, Machu Picchu is a UNESCO world heritage site visited by more than a million tourists annually. This remarkable transformation began with the photographs that accompanied Bingham’s article published in National Geographicmagazine, which depicted Machu Picchu as a lost city discovered. Focusing on the practices, technologies, and materializations of Bingham’s three expeditions to Peru (1911, 1912, 1914–1915), this book makes a convincing case that visualization, particularly through the camera, played a decisive role in positioning Machu Picchu as both a scientific discovery and a Peruvian heritage site.

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Wednesday, April 25th 

FCWSRC Seminar "Rethinking Feminist Movements in Africa with a Special Focus on Kenya"

Join us for a seminar on African Feminisms facilitated by Mary Njeri Kinyanjui, FCWSRC Research Associate and Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi.

4:00-6:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Friday, May 4th - Saturday, May 5th 

"Time, Temperature and Transit" FCWSRC Symposium

With this symposium, we seek to bring together scholars working in feminist science and technology studies to explore the intersecting themes of time, temperature, and transit. Our point of departure is to build on works charting the genealogies of cold storage and the centrality of cold storage to the development and consolidation of the life sciences, especially but not exclusively in the realm of cryopreservation.  Earlier scholarship in this area demonstrates that technologies of cold present challenges to extant understandings of temporality and ontology, relationships between parts and wholes, and concepts of species boundaries and human exceptionalism. We want to bring this literature into an ongoing conversation with feminist perspectives that foreground issues of race, sex, and sexuality as well as histories and genealogies of nationalism, colonialism, and imperialism.

Schedule TBA, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Tuesday, May 29 - Friday, June 1st 

Faculty Summer Kick-off Writing Retreat

Please join the FCWSRC for our summer kick-off writing retreat. Participants are asked to be “in residence” during all four days of the retreat, although times and working styles are flexible. A “Write-on-Site” group will take place daily from 10:00-12:00 and will offer opportunities for participants to more formally engage each other’s work if desired. 

10:00am-4:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College