Past 2018-2019 Events


Thursday, December 6th 

Anti-Colonial Feminisms Faculty Reading Group 

Join Five College faculty for a discussion on works by Silvia Federici and Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui.

The reading group will be facilitated by Kiran Asher (Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, UMass Amherst) and Michelle Joffroy (Spanish/Latin American Studies, Smith College). 

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley


Thursday, November 29th 

"Building Bridges Between Afrodiasporic Queer Transits in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas"

Public Talk by Tito Mitjans Alayón, Scholar-in-Residence, Cuba Exchange Program, Hampshire College

Tito Mitjans Alayón is an Afro-Cuban trans masculine non-binary feminist scholar and activist. He obtained a Masters in Interdisciplinary Studies of Cuban, Caribbean and Latin American History from the University of Havana, Cuba, in 2013, and he is currently a PhD candidate in the program of Feminist Studies and Interventions at the University of Arts and Sciences of Chiapas, in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico. His areas of interest include Black Critical Studies, Black Feminism, Queer and Gender Studies, and Caribbean History.

Co-sponsored by the Hampshire College Cuba Program

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College 


Wednesday, November 14th

Film Screening of Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival                                              
Join us for a screening of Fabrizio Terranova's film Donna Haraway: Story Telling for Earthly Survival about feminist thinker and historian of science Donna Haraway who is perhaps best known as the author of two revolutionary works: the essay "A Cyborg Manifesto" and the book Primate Visions. Both texts set out to upend well-established "common sense" categories: breaking down the boundaries among humans, animals, and machines while challenging gender essentialism and questioning the underlying assumptions of humanity’s fascination with primates through a post-colonial lens.                                                                                                                                                                The film features Haraway in a playful and engaging exploration of her life, influences, and ideas. Haraway is a passionate and discursive storyteller, and the film is structured around a series of discussions held in the California home she helped build by hand, on subjects including the capitalism and the anthropocene, science fiction writing as philosophical text, unconventional marital and sexual partnerships, the role of Catholicism in her upbringing, humans and dogs, the suppression of women’s writing, the surprisingly fascinating history of orthodontic aesthetics, and the need for new post-colonial and post-patriarchal narratives. It is a remarkably impressive range, from a thinker with a nimble and curious mind.   
                                                                                                  
Co-sponsored by the Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     7:00-9:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College                                                                        

Wednesday, October 24th 

FCWSRC Works in Progress Faculty Seminar 

“Gender and Microfinancing: A South Asian Experience"

Shagufta Nasreen, FCWSRC Research Associate and Assistant Professor of Women's Studies, University of Karachi

This paper argues that micro-financing is embraced in developing countries as a development intervention for women's empowerment despite growing into a large global industry creating a cycle of dependency for its borrowers. Drawing on evidence from qualitative field research, this research explores the experiences of Pakistani women borrowers and intends to compare it to earlier studies in the South Asian region to analyze how their work situations are shaped by local socio-cultural norms and globalized development agendas. 

Discussants: Lisa Armstrong (Professor of the Study of Women and Gender, Smith College), Marta Calas (Professor of Management, UMass Amherst), Svati Shah (Associate Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, UMass Amherst), and Priyanka Srivastava (Assistant Professor of History and Economics, UMass Amherst)

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Friday, October 19th 

"Intersectional Inequities: Structural Constraints of Navigating Autism Services"

Public Talk by Jennifer Singh, Associate Professor of Sociology, Georgia Institute of Technology

Intersectional forms of oppression are central to understanding autism disparities, however little is known about how such disparities are situated at the intersection of race, social class and gender. Drawing on the analytic framework of intersectionality developed by Black feminist scholars, the purpose of this presentation is to offer a grounded theory qualitative analysis based on in-depth interviews with single Black women (mothers and grandmothers) who are navigating autism services within the constraints of Medicaid health insurance and other limited resources. An intersectional approach offers a framework to interrogate how race, class, gender and other social locations operate simultaneously in social life rather than working as a single category. Importantly, it examines how power is organized, distributed, maintained, and challenged based on these intersecting social categories and the impacts it has on families, and ultimately children with autism. These alternative ways of knowing have been excluded in the representations of autism disparities thus far and offer important insight to the inextricable link between autism disparities and the structural, historical, and situational contexts of Black women’s lives.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst

3:00-5:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Wednesday, October 17th 

Book Salon with Betsy Krause on Tight Knit: Global Families and the Social Life of Fast Fashion

Join us for a discussion of Tight Knit: Global Families and the Social Life of Fast Fashion (University of Chicago Press) by Betsy Krause (Professor of Anthropology, UMass Amherst).

The coveted “Made in Italy” label calls to mind visions of nimble-fingered Italian tailors lovingly sewing elegant, high-end clothing. The phrase evokes a sense of authenticity, heritage, and rustic charm. Yet, as Betsy Krause uncovers in Tight Knit, Chinese migrants are the ones sewing “Made in Italy” labels into low-cost items for a thriving fast-fashion industry—all the while adding new patterns to the social fabric of Italy’s iconic industry. Krause offers a revelatory look into how families involved in the fashion industry are coping with globalization based on longterm research in Prato, the historic hub of textile production in the heart of metropolitan Tuscany. She brings to the fore the tensions—over value, money, beauty, family, care, and belonging—that are reaching a boiling point as the country struggles to deal with the same migration pressures that are triggering backlash all over Europe and North America.

Discussants: Anna Botta (Professor of Italian Studies and Comparative Literature, Smith College), Calvin Chen (Associate Professor of Politics, Mount Holyoke College), Anne Ciecko (Associate Professor of Communication, UMass Amherst), and Vanessa Fong (Professor of Anthropology, Amherst College)

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology at UMass Amherst

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Friday, October 5th 

FCWSRC Fall Break Faculty Writing Retreat  

Join Five College faculty, graduate students, and FCWSRC research associates for a day-long writing retreat. 

10:00am-4:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley


Tuesday, October 2nd 

Book Salon with Rajani Bhatia on Gender Before Birth: Sex Selection in a Transnational Context

Join us for a book talk and Q&A with Rajani Bhatia (Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality, University at Albany, SUNY) on her new book Gender Before Birth: Sex Selection in a Transnational Context (University of Washington Press).

In the mid-1990s, the international community pronounced prenatal sex selection via abortion an "act of violence against women" and "unethical." At the same time, new developments in reproductive technology in the United States led to a method of sex selection before conception; its US inventor marketed the practice as "family balancing" and defended it with the rhetoric of freedom of choice. In Gender before Birth, Rajani Bhatia takes on the double standard of how similar practices in the West and non-West are divergently named and framed.

Bhatia's extensive fieldwork includes interviews with clinicians, scientists, biomedical service providers, and feminist activists, and her resulting analysis extends both feminist theory on reproduction and feminist science and technology studies. She argues that we are at the beginning of a changing transnational terrain that presents new challenges to theorized inequality in reproduction, demonstrating how the technosciences often get embroiled in colonial gender and racial politics.

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Thursday, September 27th 

Anti-Colonial Feminisms Faculty Reading Group 

Discussion will be on selections from Feminist Studies Vol 43, No 3, a special issue on "Decolonial and Postcolonial Approaches: A Dialogue"

The reading group will be facilitated by Kiran Asher (Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, UMass Amherst) and Michelle Joffroy (Associate Professor of Spanish, Smith College)

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley


Wednesday, September 26th 

Book Salon with Susana Loza on Speculative Imperialisms: Monstrosity and Masquerade in Postracial Times

Join us for a discussion of Speculative Imperialisms: Monstrosity and Masquerade in Postracial Times (Lexington Books) by Susana Loza (FCWSRC Research Associate and Associate Professor of Critical Race, Gender, and Media Studies, Hampshire College).

Speculative Imperialisms explores the (settler) colonial ideologies underpinning the monstrous imaginings of contemporary popular culture in the Britain and the US. Through a close examination of District 9, Avatar, Doctor Who, Planet of the Apes, and steampunk culture, Susana Loza illuminates the durability of (settler) colonialism and how it operates through two linked yet distinct forms of racial mimicry: monsterization and minstrelsy. Speculative Imperialisms contemplates the fundamental, albeit changing, role that such racial simulations play in a putatively postracial and post-colonial era. It brings together the work on gender masquerade, racial minstrelsy, and postcolonial mimicry and puts it in dialogue with film, media, and cultural studies. 

Discussants: Laura Briggs (FCWSRC Research Associate and Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, UMass Amherst), Jina Kim (Assistant Professor of English and the Study of Women and Gender, Smith College), Lise Sanders (Professor of English Literature and Cultural Studies, Hampshire College) and Elizabeth Young (Carl M. and Elsie A. Small Professor of English, Mount Holyoke College)

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Faculty and the School of Humanities, Arts and Culture Studies at Hampshire College

6:00-8:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College


Friday, September 14th

FCWSRC Fall Reception  

Join us for the FCWSRC's annual Fall Reception to welcome our 2018-2019 Research Associates and new Five College faculty in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 

4:00-6:00pm, FCWSRC, 83 College Street, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley