Translating God(s): Intertextuality between Missionary and Maya Literature in Colonial Guatemala (lecture by Garry Sparks)

Thu, Sep 28 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Herter 301
sparks lecture poster

Early sixteenth-century Spanish Dominicans developed an alphabet to write the Mayan languages, but also adopted elements of Maya myths to convey Christian theology. And within only a few decades, the last pre-contact generation of Maya leaders began to write their own documents with the mendicants' orthography. Focusing on names for Christian and Maya god(s), intertextual analysis between the Dominican Theologia Indorum (Theology for the Indians) and the K'iche' Popul Wuj (Book of the Council) allows for a tracing of histories of transmission and reception during the period of first encounters.

Garry Sparks is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at George Mason University. He is the author of The Americas' First Theologies: Early Sources of Post-Contact Indigenous Religion (Oxford University Press, 2017) and is producing a critical translation of the Theologia Indorum from K'iche' Maya.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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Book Salon with Laura Furlan: Indigenous Cities

Mon, Apr 2 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street
Furlan Book Salon

Please join the Five College Women's Studies Research Center for a book Salon with Laura M. Furlan, Associate Professor of English, UMass Amherst. 

Discussants: Christine DeLucia (Mount Holyoke College) and Laura Doyle (UMass Amherst)

In Indigenous Cities, Laura Furlan demonstrates that stories of the urban experience are essential to an understanding of modern Indigeneity. She situates Native identify among theories of diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and transnationalism by examining urban narratives. 

Dinner provided. RSVP: https://fcwsrc-salon-april.eventbrite.com/

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Planting Yourself in the Land: Urban Indian Religious Regeneration

Mon, Jan 29 2018 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Skinner 216
Natalie Avalos

Please join us for a lecture by Natalie Avalos of Connecticut College.

Decolonization has often been understood in statist terms—as a project of national sovereignty and political consolidation by a formerly colonized nation. This talk focuses on decolonization as a religious, even ontological endeavor among ‘urban Indians’ in Albuquerque, New Mexico, specifically the diverse Native community associated with La Plazita Institute. La Plazita is a community center using Indigenous cultural forms to mentor and support Native American and Chicano youth who have become ensnared in the criminal justice system, due to on-going structural violence rooted in a history of dispossession. Avalos demonstrates that this center acts as a locus for an emerging pan-Indigenous identity, wherein religious revitalization heals/empowers these individuals, regenerating them as a united people.
Reception to follow.
Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Telling Our Own Stories

Mon, Nov 13 2017 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Dwight 101
Rosalyn LaPier2

Rosalyn LaPier explores how religion influences Indigenous peoples relationship with the natural world in her latest work "Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet." Encouraged by an elder to start ‘telling our own stories’ Rosalyn will discuss the complexities and ethics of writing about one’s own community and family. She will reflect on how to center community voices, work with elders, use oral histories and archival sources. 

Rosalyn LaPier, PhD, is a member of the Blackfeet Tride of Montana and Metis and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Montana. 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Native New England: Resistance, Reclamation, Revitalization

Wed, Oct 4 2017 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Integrated Science Building (ISB) Room 145
18 0035 resistance studies speaker series poster fall 2017

Resistance Studies Initiative Fall Speaker Series: 
Distinguished researchers and activists share critical reflections on resistance issues.

Lisa Brooks is Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College. Her first book, The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast, reframes the historical and literary landscape of the northeast, and received the Media Ecology Association's Dorothy Lee Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Culture in 2011. Although deeply rooted in her Abenaki homeland, Brooks’s work has been widely influential in a global network of scholars. She served on the inaugural Council of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA), and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of SAIL and Ethnohistory. She also works on the Advisory Board of Gedakina, a non-profit organization focused on Indigenous cultural revitalization, traditional ecological knowledge, and community wellness in New England. Her second book, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War is forthcoming from Yale University Press (January 2018).

Abenaki scholar Lisa Brooks will discuss the history of Indigenous resistance and adaptation to colonialism in New England, from the “First Indian War” (King Philip’s War, 1675-1678) and eighteenth-century Wabanaki dam protests to contemporary struggles to retain and protect sovereignty and sustenance. Native leaders, artists and activists have used a variety of innovative tools toward reclamation and revitalization, including technologies like writing, filmmaking, and unexpected digital forms. She will discuss the ways in which environmental and social justice are often intertwined and lay the groundwork for imagining alternative futures through the renewal of relationships of alliance and reciprocity.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
Not accessible
Contact email: 
resist@umass.edu
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Coming to You from the Indigenous Future: A Showcase of Indigenous Women's Animation, Short Film, and Virtual Reality with Danika Medak-Saltzman

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Friendly Reading Room, Frost Library
Coming to you from the Indigenous Future

Dr. Danika Medak-Saltzman is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder. She was the Katrin H. Lamon Fellow at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, N.M. in 2012-2013. Her teaching and research interests include Indigenous feminisms, postcolonial science fiction, Indigenous futurisms, and visual/material culture.

Please note the TIME CHANGE to 3PM.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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For accommodations please contact chradil17@amherst.edu

Community Engagement and Collaborative Archaeology at the Stewart Indian School

Tue, Mar 6 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Dwight Hall Room 101
cowieposter

Stewart Indian School in Carson City, Nevada was established in 1890 as a federally mandated residential school that attempted to remove Native children from approximately 200 Tribal communities and assimilate them into mainstream society.

Dr. Sarah Cowie will discuss collaborative efforts using archaeology, historical documents, and oral history to examine the continued effects of removal and attempted assimilation of Native communities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as well as the threat of cultural erasure posed by removal of artifacts from the site.

Collaborating with young people and elders from several Tribes helped to decolonize research, enrich interpretations and preservation efforts at this site, and demonstrate the knowledge and resilience of communities whose voices should be influential in archaeological research.

Sarah Cowie is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Nevada-Reno. Her research and teaching interests include the archaeology of laboring communities, social theories of power relations, and collaborative archaeology with American Indian communities. She earned her B.A. in Archaeology from Mount Holyoke College, her M.S. in Industrial Archaeology from Michigan Technological University, and her Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Arizona. In 2016, she received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from President Obama.

This event is sponsored by the Mount Holyoke College Department of History, the Mount Holyoke College Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Smith College Department of Anthropology, the UMass Amherst Department of Anthropology, the Five College Lecture Fund, and the Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Program.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Decolonization in Comparative Context: What is Decolonization?

Fri, Oct 27 2017 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Frost Library
Decolonization in Comparative Context poster

What is decolonization? What are its origins and its connection to the histories and memories of a given geographical space? What legacies does decolonial thinking pass on to contemporary thought? And what can we learn about decolonization from comparative contexts?

Featuring: 

Friday, October 27th 4:00 - 6:00
What is Decolonization?
Featuring Anjali Prabhu, George Ciccariello-Maher, J. Kehaulani Kauanui

Saturday, October 28th
10:30 - 12:30
On Red Skin, White Masks
Featuring Glen Coulthard, Mark Rifkin, Jodi Byrd, Kyle Mays

1:30 - 3:30
On Brown Skin, White Masks
Featuring Anthony Alessandrini, Muriam Haleh Davis, Rana Barakat

3:45 - 5:45
On Black Skin, Whte Masks
Featuring Grant Farred, Kris Sealey, Abdul JanMohamed

Sponsored by the Amherst College Office of the Dean of Faculty, Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the Lamont Fund, and departments of American Studies, Anthropology & Sociology, Black Studies, English; the Mt. Holyoke History Department; and the Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Faculty Seminar.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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"The Women, They Hold the Ground": Water Walkers, Digital Artwork and Indigenous Futurities

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street
Medak Saltzman  Flyer Apr11

Public Talk by Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Sudies, University of Colorado, Boulder

This talk is organized around three pieces of digital artwork created by
Anishinaabe and Metis artist Elizabeth LaPensee, namely "The Women, They
Hold the Ground"(2015), "The Grandmothers Carry Water from the Other
World" (2016), and "With Songs to Pull Oil from Water" (2017). Situating these
pieces within the political moments from which they emerge foregrounds
Indigenous resurgence movements, particularly those intended to protect and
pray for water. The talk highlights how the artistic and more overtly political
arms of Indigenous futurist efforts are emblematic of the power of imagining
and bringing into existence alternative realities and alternative futures.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Strength, Unity, Power: Contemporary Practices in Native Arts

Fri, Sep 15 2017 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
ILC Room S240
Roskill Symposium 2017 Spring

The Mark Roskill Symposium in Art History features an in-depth discussion on the topics of colonialism, resistance, and repatriation. The symposium explores the cutting edge of what artists, museum professionals, and scholars are doing to promote justice for Native American communities, both in the art world and beyond. The symposium keynote will be given by Wendy Red Star, followed by a panel discussion featuring Cinnamon Catlin-Legutko, President/CEO of the Abbe Museum, and Dr. Sonya Atalay, Associate Professor of Anthropology at UMass Amherst.

The lecture will be held in ILC Room S240, with a reception to follow in Campus Center Room 162.

Campus: 
UMass Amherst
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