Native American and Indigenous Studies Symposium

Thu, Mar 28 2019 - 5:00pm to Fri, Mar 29 2019 - 8:00pm
Location: 
Hampshire College and Amherst College, see poster for more information
NAIS

Survivance Stories: Indigenous Struggle, Resistance, and Innovation.

As Indigenous peoples of New England approach the anniversary of 400 years of settler colonial disruption (in 2020), we see this as a moment to take a decolonial approach to this anniversary and reflect upon—and celebrate—how indigenous peoples everywhere have struggled, resisted, and innovated to ensure the survivance of themselves and their lifeways.

PLEASE JOIN THE CONVERSATION!

Campus: 
Other
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Conflict, Resistance, and Legacies: Revisiting King Philip’s War

Sat, Apr 28 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Deerfield Academy Garonzik Auditorium

Three historians offer groundbreaking reinterpretations of the 17th-century conflict later remembered as “King Philip’s War.” Lisa Brooks (Amherst College), Christine DeLucia (Mount Holyoke College), and Neal Salisbury (Smith College, Emeritus) will share new evidence and perspectives that shed fresh light on the origins, nature, and persistent powerful legacies of one of the most devastating wars in North American history.  Their work pays special attention to Indigenous homelands, kinship networks, intellectual traditions, and their complex intersections with Euro-American histories and communities in New England. The afternoon will begin with individual presentations by each author, followed by a moderated panel discussion that includes audience Q & A, and will conclude with book signing. 

Lisa Brooks, Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War

Christine DeLucia, Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast

Neal Salisbury, ed., The Sovereignty and Goodness of God: with Related Documents

This event is free and open to the publicCo-sponsored by Historic Deerfield and Deerfield Academy, the program will be held in the Garonzik Auditorium at Deerfield Academy.

Campus: 
Other
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"The Women, They Hold the Ground": Water Walkers, Digital Artwork and Indigenous Futurities

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street
Medak Saltzman  Flyer Apr11

Public Talk by Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Sudies, University of Colorado, Boulder

This talk is organized around three pieces of digital artwork created by
Anishinaabe and Metis artist Elizabeth LaPensee, namely "The Women, They
Hold the Ground"(2015), "The Grandmothers Carry Water from the Other
World" (2016), and "With Songs to Pull Oil from Water" (2017). Situating these
pieces within the political moments from which they emerge foregrounds
Indigenous resurgence movements, particularly those intended to protect and
pray for water. The talk highlights how the artistic and more overtly political
arms of Indigenous futurist efforts are emblematic of the power of imagining
and bringing into existence alternative realities and alternative futures.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Before They Were Ecologically Noble Savages: Global Representations of Amazonian Peoples and Nature in the 1970s

Tue, Nov 7 2017 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Converse Hall – Porter Lounge
Sarzynski poster

Sarah Sarzynski Assistant Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College

Sarah Sarzynski’s talk will focus on global representations of indigenous peoples, the environment and sexuality and how it relates to popular culture theory.

How does the world imagine Amazonia? Sarzynski shows what Amazonian discourses were circulating immediately before the global environmental movement recognized “tropical deforestation” and the burning of the Amazon as a global emergency, and creates environmental-indian alliances. Her analysis focuses on visual representations of peoples in the region to understand broader politics of the Cold War in the region. This talk on global representations of indigenous peoples, the environment and sexuality and relates to popular culture theory. This presentation is based on a peer-reviewed article on representations of the Amazon in popular culture in the 1970’s.

This event is being sponsored by the Eastman Fund and the Political Science Department of Amherst College.

The event is free and open to the public

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Beyond the Frontlines: An Ode to Indigenous Resistance

Fri, Apr 6 2018 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Octagon
Beyond the Frontlines 2018

As part of the 4th Annual Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Symposium, join us for a night of demystifying indigenous resistance through both contemporary and traditional indigenous culture. Featuring performances by La Marea, Urban Thunder, Big Wind, and more.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location

Book Launch Party for Laura Furlan

Wed, Oct 25 2017 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Amherst Books, 8 Main St, Amherst, MA
Indigenous Cities Flyer

In Indigenous Cities Laura M. Furlan, Associate Professor of English at UMass Amherst, demonstrates that stories of the urban experience are essential to an understanding of modern Indigeneity. She situates Native identity among theories of diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and transnationalism by examining urban narratives—such as those written by Sherman Alexie, Janet Campbell Hale, Louise Erdrich, and Susan Power—along with the work of filmmakers and artists. In these stories Native peoples navigate new surroundings, find and reformulate community, and maintain and redefine Indian identity in the postrelocation era. These narratives illuminate the changing relationship between urban Indigenous peoples and their tribal nations and territories and the ways in which new cosmopolitan bonds both reshape and are interpreted by tribal identities.

Campus: 
Other
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Book Salon with Laura Furlan: Indigenous Cities

Mon, Apr 2 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street
Furlan Book Salon

Please join the Five College Women's Studies Research Center for a book Salon with Laura M. Furlan, Associate Professor of English, UMass Amherst. 

Discussants: Christine DeLucia (Mount Holyoke College) and Laura Doyle (UMass Amherst)

In Indigenous Cities, Laura Furlan demonstrates that stories of the urban experience are essential to an understanding of modern Indigeneity. She situates Native identify among theories of diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and transnationalism by examining urban narratives. 

Dinner provided. RSVP: https://fcwsrc-salon-april.eventbrite.com/

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Accessible location

Coming to You from the Indigenous Future: A Showcase of Indigenous Women's Animation, Short Film, and Virtual Reality with Danika Medak-Saltzman

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Friendly Reading Room, Frost Library
Coming to you from the Indigenous Future

Dr. Danika Medak-Saltzman is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder. She was the Katrin H. Lamon Fellow at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, N.M. in 2012-2013. Her teaching and research interests include Indigenous feminisms, postcolonial science fiction, Indigenous futurisms, and visual/material culture.

Please note the TIME CHANGE to 3PM.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Accessibility info: 
For accommodations please contact chradil17@amherst.edu

Community Engagement and Collaborative Archaeology at the Stewart Indian School

Tue, Mar 6 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Dwight Hall Room 101
cowieposter

Stewart Indian School in Carson City, Nevada was established in 1890 as a federally mandated residential school that attempted to remove Native children from approximately 200 Tribal communities and assimilate them into mainstream society.

Dr. Sarah Cowie will discuss collaborative efforts using archaeology, historical documents, and oral history to examine the continued effects of removal and attempted assimilation of Native communities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as well as the threat of cultural erasure posed by removal of artifacts from the site.

Collaborating with young people and elders from several Tribes helped to decolonize research, enrich interpretations and preservation efforts at this site, and demonstrate the knowledge and resilience of communities whose voices should be influential in archaeological research.

Sarah Cowie is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Nevada-Reno. Her research and teaching interests include the archaeology of laboring communities, social theories of power relations, and collaborative archaeology with American Indian communities. She earned her B.A. in Archaeology from Mount Holyoke College, her M.S. in Industrial Archaeology from Michigan Technological University, and her Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Arizona. In 2016, she received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from President Obama.

This event is sponsored by the Mount Holyoke College Department of History, the Mount Holyoke College Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Smith College Department of Anthropology, the UMass Amherst Department of Anthropology, the Five College Lecture Fund, and the Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Program.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible

Decolonization in Comparative Context: Red Skin, White Masks; Brown Skin, White Masks; Black Skin, White Masks

Sat, Oct 28 2017 - 10:30am to 5:45pm
Location: 
Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Frost Library
Decolonization in Comparative Context poster

What is decolonization? What are its origins and its connection to the histories and memories of a given geographical space? What legacies does decolonial thinking pass on to contemporary thought? And what can we learn about decolonization from comparative contexts?

Featuring: 

Saturday, October 28th

10:30 - 12:30
On Red Skin, White Masks
Featuring Glen Coulthard, Mark Rifkin, Jodi Byrd, Kyle Mays

1:30 - 3:30
On Brown Skin, White Masks
Featuring Anthony Alessandrini, Muriam Haleh Davis, Rana Barakat

3:45 - 5:45
On Black Skin, Whte Masks
Featuring Grant Farred, Kris Sealey, Abdul JanMohamed

Sponsored by the Amherst College Office of the Dean of Faculty, Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the Lamont Fund, and departments of American Studies, Anthropology & Sociology, Black Studies, English; the Mt. Holyoke History Department; and the Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Faculty Seminar.

Campus: 
Amherst College
Not accessible
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