Five College Consortium

Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies

"The Women, They Hold the Ground": Water Walkers, Digital Artwork and Indigenous Futurities

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street

Public Talk by Danika Medak-Saltzman, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Sudies, University of Colorado, Boulder

This talk is organized around three pieces of digital artwork created by
Anishinaabe and Metis artist Elizabeth LaPensee, namely "The Women, They
Hold the Ground"(2015), "The Grandmothers Carry Water from the Other
World" (2016), and "With Songs to Pull Oil from Water" (2017). Situating these
pieces within the political moments from which they emerge foregrounds
Indigenous resurgence movements, particularly those intended to protect and
pray for water. The talk highlights how the artistic and more overtly political
arms of Indigenous futurist efforts are emblematic of the power of imagining
and bringing into existence alternative realities and alternative futures.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Coming to You from the Indigenous Future: A Showcase of Indigenous Women's Animation, Short Film, and Virtual Reality with Danika Medak-Saltzman

Wed, Apr 11 2018 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Friendly Reading Room, Frost Library

Dr. Danika Medak-Saltzman is Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder. She was the Katrin H. Lamon Fellow at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, N.M. in 2012-2013. Her teaching and research interests include Indigenous feminisms, postcolonial science fiction, Indigenous futurisms, and visual/material culture.

Please note the TIME CHANGE to 3PM.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Accessibility info: 
For accommodations please contact chradil17@amherst.edu
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Sovereignty of the Soul: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America

Tue, Apr 10 2018 - 7:30pm to 9:00pm
Location: 
Powerhouse

Sarah Deer (Muscogee (Creek) Nation) is a professor of Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies and Public Affairs and Administration at the University of Kansas. She has worked to end violence against women for over 25 years and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2014. Her scholarship focuses on the intersection of federal Indian law and victims' rights. Her latest book is The Beginning and End of Rape:
Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America, which has received several awards. Her work on violence against Native women has received national recognition from the American Bar Association and the Department of Justice. Professor Deer is also the Chief Justice for the Prairie Island Indian Community Court of Appeals.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Accessibility info: 
For accommodations contact avann@amherst.edu

Beyond the Frontlines: An Ode to Indigenous Resistance

Fri, Apr 6 2018 - 7:00pm to 10:00pm
Location: 
Octagon

As part of the 4th Annual Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Symposium, join us for a night of demystifying indigenous resistance through both contemporary and traditional indigenous culture. Featuring performances by La Marea, Urban Thunder, Big Wind, and more.

Campus: 
Amherst College
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RESIST! 4th Annual Native American & Indigenous Studies Symposium

Thu, Apr 5 2018 (All day) to Fri, Apr 6 2018 (All day)
Location: 
Various

Join us for RESIST!, the 4th Annual Native American & Indigenous Studies Symposium. 

Featuring: 

Thursday, April 5, 7PM
Film screening of "When Two Worlds Collide" 
Stirn Auditorium, Amherst College

Friday, April 6, 9AM-5PM
Symposium
Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Frost Library, Amherst College

Friday, April 6, 7PM
Performances
The Octagon, Amherst College

This event is co-sponsored by: Hampshire: School of Critical Social Inquiry, Compassionate Knowledge Project, School of Cognitive Science, Ethics and the Common Good Project, School of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies, Humanities Program, Office for Diversity and Multicultural Education; UMass Amherst: Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Anthropology, Chancellor's Office, CPNAIS; Mount Holyoke: History; Amherst College: AAS Budgetary Committee, President's Office, Office of Student Affairs; Five College Native American and Imdigenous Studies; Five Colleges Lecture Fund. 

Campus: 
Amherst College
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Book Salon with Laura Furlan: Indigenous Cities

Mon, Apr 2 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location: 
83 College Street

Please join the Five College Women's Studies Research Center for a book Salon with Laura M. Furlan, Associate Professor of English, UMass Amherst. 

Discussants: Christine DeLucia (Mount Holyoke College) and Laura Doyle (UMass Amherst)

In Indigenous Cities, Laura Furlan demonstrates that stories of the urban experience are essential to an understanding of modern Indigeneity. She situates Native identify among theories of diaspora, cosmopolitanism, and transnationalism by examining urban narratives. 

Dinner provided. RSVP: https://fcwsrc-salon-april.eventbrite.com/

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Community Engagement and Collaborative Archaeology at the Stewart Indian School

Tue, Mar 6 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Dwight Hall Room 101

Stewart Indian School in Carson City, Nevada was established in 1890 as a federally mandated residential school that attempted to remove Native children from approximately 200 Tribal communities and assimilate them into mainstream society.

Dr. Sarah Cowie will discuss collaborative efforts using archaeology, historical documents, and oral history to examine the continued effects of removal and attempted assimilation of Native communities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as well as the threat of cultural erasure posed by removal of artifacts from the site.

Collaborating with young people and elders from several Tribes helped to decolonize research, enrich interpretations and preservation efforts at this site, and demonstrate the knowledge and resilience of communities whose voices should be influential in archaeological research.

Sarah Cowie is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Nevada-Reno. Her research and teaching interests include the archaeology of laboring communities, social theories of power relations, and collaborative archaeology with American Indian communities. She earned her B.A. in Archaeology from Mount Holyoke College, her M.S. in Industrial Archaeology from Michigan Technological University, and her Ph.D. in Anthropology from University of Arizona. In 2016, she received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from President Obama.

This event is sponsored by the Mount Holyoke College Department of History, the Mount Holyoke College Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Smith College Department of Anthropology, the UMass Amherst Department of Anthropology, the Five College Lecture Fund, and the Five College Native American & Indigenous Studies Program.

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Planting Yourself in the Land: Urban Indian Religious Regeneration

Mon, Jan 29 2018 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Location: 
Skinner 216

Please join us for a lecture by Natalie Avalos of Connecticut College.

Decolonization has often been understood in statist terms—as a project of national sovereignty and political consolidation by a formerly colonized nation. This talk focuses on decolonization as a religious, even ontological endeavor among ‘urban Indians’ in Albuquerque, New Mexico, specifically the diverse Native community associated with La Plazita Institute. La Plazita is a community center using Indigenous cultural forms to mentor and support Native American and Chicano youth who have become ensnared in the criminal justice system, due to on-going structural violence rooted in a history of dispossession. Avalos demonstrates that this center acts as a locus for an emerging pan-Indigenous identity, wherein religious revitalization heals/empowers these individuals, regenerating them as a united people.
Reception to follow.
Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
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Massachusetts Native Peoples Working Groups Lands, Indian Arts, and Education

Sat, Nov 18 2017 - 10:00am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Faculty Lounge, 2nd fl. Franklin Patterson Hall

The Massachusetts Native Peoples Working Groups will meet twice this fall to continue discussing and strategizing around protecting traditional lands and natural resources, protecting Indian artisans, and supporting native education. All and welcomed and encouraged to attend.

Please RSVP to Nicole Friederichs at nfriederichs@suffolk.edu

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Please RSVP to Nicole Friederichs at nfriederichs@suffolk.edu

Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England – An evening with author and professor of history, Jean M. O’Brien, Ph.D.

Wed, Nov 15 2017 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford CT

Please join us and the members of the Mohegan Tribe for a special presentation by Professor Jean M. O’Brien (University of Minnesota). Dr. O’Brien will present on her  book, Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England (University of Minnesota Press, 2010).  Drawing on more than six hundred local histories from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, Dr. O’Brien explores how these narratives inculcated the myth of Indian extinction, a myth that has stubbornly remained in the American consciousness. Firsting and Lasting argues that local histories became a primary means by which European Americans asserted their own modernity while denying it to Indian peoples.

Campus: 
Other
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
This event is free, but please RSVP to let us know you will attend at (860) 236-5621 x238 or rsvp@chs.org
Campus contact: 

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