Five College Consortium

Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies

Before They Were Ecologically Noble Savages: Global Representations of Amazonian Peoples and Nature in the 1970s

Tue, Nov 7 2017 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Converse Hall – Porter Lounge

Sarah Sarzynski Assistant Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College

Sarah Sarzynski’s talk will focus on global representations of indigenous peoples, the environment and sexuality and how it relates to popular culture theory.

How does the world imagine Amazonia? Sarzynski shows what Amazonian discourses were circulating immediately before the global environmental movement recognized “tropical deforestation” and the burning of the Amazon as a global emergency, and creates environmental-indian alliances. Her analysis focuses on visual representations of peoples in the region to understand broader politics of the Cold War in the region. This talk on global representations of indigenous peoples, the environment and sexuality and relates to popular culture theory. This presentation is based on a peer-reviewed article on representations of the Amazon in popular culture in the 1970’s.

This event is being sponsored by the Eastman Fund and the Political Science Department of Amherst College.

The event is free and open to the public

Campus: 
Amherst College
Accessible location
Campus contact: 

Telling Our Own Stories

Mon, Nov 13 2017 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Dwight 101

Rosalyn LaPier explores how religion influences Indigenous peoples relationship with the natural world in her latest work "Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet." Encouraged by an elder to start ‘telling our own stories’ Rosalyn will discuss the complexities and ethics of writing about one’s own community and family. She will reflect on how to center community voices, work with elders, use oral histories and archival sources. 

Rosalyn LaPier, PhD, is a member of the Blackfeet Tride of Montana and Metis and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Montana. 

Campus: 
Mount Holyoke College
Not accessible
Campus contact: 

Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England – An evening with author and professor of history, Jean M. O’Brien, Ph.D.

Wed, Nov 15 2017 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford CT

Please join us and the members of the Mohegan Tribe for a special presentation by Professor Jean M. O’Brien (University of Minnesota). Dr. O’Brien will present on her  book, Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England (University of Minnesota Press, 2010).  Drawing on more than six hundred local histories from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, Dr. O’Brien explores how these narratives inculcated the myth of Indian extinction, a myth that has stubbornly remained in the American consciousness. Firsting and Lasting argues that local histories became a primary means by which European Americans asserted their own modernity while denying it to Indian peoples.

Campus: 
Other
Not accessible
Ticket info: 
This event is free, but please RSVP to let us know you will attend at (860) 236-5621 x238 or rsvp@chs.org

Massachusetts Native Peoples Working Groups Lands, Indian Arts, and Education

Sat, Nov 18 2017 - 10:00am to 1:00pm
Location: 
Faculty Lounge, 2nd fl. Franklin Patterson Hall

The Massachusetts Native Peoples Working Groups will meet twice this fall to continue discussing and strategizing around protecting traditional lands and natural resources, protecting Indian artisans, and supporting native education. All and welcomed and encouraged to attend.

Please RSVP to Nicole Friederichs at nfriederichs@suffolk.edu

Campus: 
Hampshire College
Accessible location
Ticket info: 
Please RSVP to Nicole Friederichs at nfriederichs@suffolk.edu