Kathleen Brown-Perez

Kathleen Brown-Perez (Brothertown) is Associate Professor at Commonwealth Honors College, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

Attorney for the Brothertown Indian Nation; author of “The Brothertown Indian Nation: Samson Occom’s Tribe from Formation to the Quest for Federal Re-Acknowledgment,” in Amy E. Den Ouden and Jean M. O’Brien (eds.), Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook (University of North Carolina Press, 2013), and other articles. 


Margaret Bruchac

Margaret Bruchac (Abenaki) is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania. B.A., Smith College; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Editor of Indigenous Archaeologies: A Reader in Decolonization (Left Coast Press, 2010); Articles include “Lost and Found: NAGPRA, Scattered Relics and Restorative Methodologies” Museum Anthropology (2010); “Abenaki Connections to 1704: The Sadoques Family and Deerfield, 2004,” in Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney (eds.), Captive Histories: Captivity Narratives, French Relations and Native Stories of the 1704 Deerfield Raid (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006); “Earthshapers and Placemakers: Algonkian Indian Stories and the Landscape,” in H. Martin Wobst and Claire Smith (eds.), Indigenous Archaeologies: Decolonizing Theory and Practice (Routledge Press. 2005).


Linda Coombs

Linda Coombs (Aquinnah Wampanoag) is Program Director of the Aquinnah Cultural Center on Martha’s Vineyard. 

Coombs has over 30 years of museum experience with the Boston Children’s Museum and with the Wampanoag Indigenous Program at Plimoth Plantation. She is an acknowledged expert in the history, technology, and arts of her seventeenth century ancestors, noted especially for her bead work and skill in making traditional deerskin outfits, twined weaving, and woven bulrush and cattail mats. Coombs is a frequent consultant on scholarly and educational projects.


Amy Den Ouden

Amy Den Ouden is Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Author of Beyond Conquest: Native Peoples and the Struggle for History in New England (University of Nebraska Press, 2005); and “Altered State? Policy Narratives, Recognition, and the ‘New’ War on Indians in Connecticut,” in Amy Den Ouden and Jean O’Brien (eds.), Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook (University of North Carolina Press, 2013). 


Rae Gould

Rae Gould (Nipmuc) is Lecturer and Repatriation Coordinator, Department of Anthropology, University of Amherst.

Author of “The Nipmuc Nation, Federal Acknowledgment, and a Case of Mistaken Identity,” in Amy Den Ouden and Jean O’Brien (eds.), Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook (University of North Carolina Press, 2013); “Indigenous Archaeology and Being Indian in New England,” in George Nicholas (ed.), Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists (Left Coast Press), 2010. 


Jessie Little Doe Baird

Jessie Little Doe Baird (Mashpee Wampanoag) is Director of the Wôpanâak Language Reclamation Project.

John D. and Catherine MacArthur Fellow (2010); author of An Introduction to Wôpanâak Grammar (MIT Press, 2000); numerous workbooks and translations for Wôpanâak and Pequot language students. Current projects include The Wôpanâak Dictionary and Descriptive Grammar


Jean O’Brien

Jean O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe) is Professor of History, University of Minnesota.

Author of Dispossession by Degrees: Indian Land and Identity in Natick, Massachusetts, 1650-1790 (Cambridge University Press, 1997); Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England (University of Minnesota Press, 2010); co-editor of Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook (University of North Carolina Press, 2013). Former president, Native American and Indigenous Association, American Society for Ethnohistory.