Architectural Studies

The Five College Architectural Studies Program embraces the complexity of the process and practice of architecture and attempts to convey—to students and to the community—the many sides of design.

What is architecture? The objective of the Five College Architectural Studies program is to cultivate concerned architectural designers and thinkers through a flexible yet rigorous interdisciplinary course of study. Our cross-disciplinary approach to architectural education introduces students to a multitude of ways of thinking about design in history, in theory and in the studio. The program encourages students to explore a broad cross-section of courses—both in and beyond the architecture discipline of architecture across the Five Colleges—and introduces students to a diverse collection of faculty members, methodologies and design approaches.

On This Page

Faculty

Nicola M. Courtright
Professor of the History of Art and European Studies and Chair of Architectural Studies, Amherst College
nmcourtright@amherst.edu

Heidi Gilpin
Associate Professor of German, Amherst College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
hgilpin@amherst.edu

Ronald C. Rosbottom
Winifred L. Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Professor of French and European Studies, Amherst College
rcrosbottom@amherst.edu

Gabriel Arboleda 
Assistant Professor, Sustainable Architecture, Amherst College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
arboleda@amherst.edu

Polina Barskova
Associate Professor, Russian Literature and Film and Urban Studies, Hampshire College
pbHA@hampshire.edu

Myrna Breitbart
Professor Emerita, Geography and Urban Studies, Hampshire College
mmbSS@hampshire.edu

Karen Koehler
Professor, Architectural and Art History, Hampshire College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
kkHACU@hampshire.edu

Thom Long
Associate Professor, Architecture and Design, Hampshire College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
tlHA@hampshire.edu

James Miller
Professor Emeritus, Communications, Hampshire College
jrmCCS@hampshire.edu

Michael T. Davis
Professor of Art History and Architecture (Medieval, Modern, Islamic) and Chair, Architectural Studies Program, Mount Holyoke College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
mtdavis@mtholyoke.edu

Jessica Maier
Associate Professor of Art History and Architecture (Early modern, Baroque, History of maps), Mount Holyoke College
jmaier@mtholyoke.edu

Ajay Sinha
Professor of Art History and Architecture (Indian art, Asian art, Indian films), Mount Holyoke College
asinha@mtholyoke.edu

Joseph Smith
Professor Emeritus of Art (Studio art and sculpture), Mount Holyoke College
smithj@mtholyoke.edu

Paul Staiti
Professor of Art History and Architecture (American art, cultural history, film studies), Mount Holyoke College
pstaiti@mtholyoke.edu

Brigitte Buettner
Louise Ines Doyle 1934 Professor of Art, Smith College
bbuettne@smith.edu

Barbara Kellum 
Professor of Art, Smith College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
bkellum@email.smith.edu  

Dana Leibsohn
Alice Pratt Brown Professor of Art, Smith College
dleibsoh@smith.edu

Elisa Kim
Assistant Professor of Architectural Studies, Smith College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
emkim@smith.edu

John Moore
Professor of Art, Smith College
jmoore@smith.edu

Frazer Ward
Professor of Art, Associate Chair of the Department, Smith College
fward@smith.edu

Caryn Brause
AIA LEED-AP
Associate Professor, Architecture & Design, UMass Amherst
cjbrause@art.umass.edu

Carey Clouse
Associate Professor, Architecture and Landscape Architecture, UMass Amherst
clouse@art.umass.edu

Naomi Darling
Assistant Professor, Sustainable Architecture, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
mndHA@hampshire.edu

Joseph Krupczynski
Associate Professor, Art & Architecture History
josephk@art.umass.edu  

Kathleen Lugosch
Professor, Art, Architecture, Art History, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
lugosch@art.umass.edu  

Ray Kinoshita Mann
Associate Professor, Architecture Committee Chair, Art & Art History, UMass Amherst
rkmann@art.umass.edu  

Max Page
Professor, Art, Architecture & Art History, Graduate Program Director of Historic Preservation, UMass Amherst
mpage@umass.edu  

Sigrid Miller Pollin
Professor Emerita, Art, Architecture & Art History, UMass Amherst
smillerp@art.umass.edu
  

Pari Riahi
Assistant Professor, Architecture Department, UMass Amherst
priahi@umass.edu

Stephen Schreiber
Professor and Program Director, Architecture + Design, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
schreiber@umass.edu  

The Major

About the Major

The Five College Architectural Studies program encourages a serious commitment to the study and practice of architecture. It also opens students to discovering the ways in which architecture effects change in—and is affected by—its surrounding environment. Students are strongly encouraged to explore, study and analyze elements of the design process, including urban fabrics, social structures, environmental systems and economics of building. While immersed in a diverse cross-section of courses in a multitude of disciplines, students are encouraged to identify and develop their individual role as designers and thinkers. The impact of their actions on an individual, community and national level are probed.

The Five College architecture program embraces the complexity of the process and practice of architecture and attempts to convey—to students and to the community—the many sides of design. We explore architecture through: art, technology, environmental studies, history, theory, psychology, physiology, physics, media design, sociology, semiologylinguistics, politics, science and math; we consider creative modes of operation while we look at creativity, patterns, actions, weight, power, force, light, memory, time, sound, color, language, programming, syntax, form, environment, resources, humanity, struggle, infrastructure, consciousness, perception, networks, materials, transport, commodities, community, marketing, family, public-ness and private-ness. Students will find a personal connection to architecture by investigating the many ways in which the built environment impacts their lives and the ways in which they as students of architectural history, theory and practice might, in turn, change that world.

Amherst College, Hampshire College and Mount Holyoke College participate in the Five College Architectural Studies (FCAS) major. The major includes nine courses, plus a capstone semester in the senior year. Students are required to take four foundation courses focused on architectural history and design, and five intermediate courses (in their sophomore and junior years) to be determined with their advisor, in which they develop their particular field of concentration. In the senior year, students are required to complete a capstone project; this can be pursued in the context of an already existing course, or in an independent study course.

Declaring the Major

In order to be admitted to the Five College major program, each student (in close consultation with one or more of the program advisors) will put together a proposed plan of study including a statement of purpose and a list of projected courses, to be evaluated by a review committee made up of representative members of the FCAS faculty. Applications will be reviewed twice per year. The progress of the major, and any possible rerouting or changes in direction, can be made in consultation with the campus advisor, who will consult with the FCAS committee as necessary. Students can propose to join the major at any time during their first, second or third years—but their proposed concentration and eight of the required courses must be completed by the end of their junior year.

The Capstone Project

The required semester-long capstone project can be in any area of architectural studies, and might be a design project, research paper, exhibition/installation or urban plan; it may take any number of creative forms and formats. When the required courses are met, each student will submit a proposal describing the specific capstone topic, working project outline and research strategies, and include a significant working bibliography. This proposal will be read and evaluated by the FCAS faculty committee.

Please contact your advisor for more information about how the major works at your school or email us at fcas@fivecolleges.edu.

Courses

Spring 2022 Architectural Studies Courses

01
4.00

Karen R. Koehler

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
ARCH-131-01-2122S
krkoehler@amherst.edu
ARHA-131-01, ARCH-131-01, EUST-131-01

(Offered as ARHA 131, ARCH 131 and EUST 131.) Throughout history, buildings have directed human activity, shaping social interactions, symbolizing political power, and influencing multiple kinds of artistic expression. This course is a selected introduction to the history and theory of architecture, from the earliest forms of human habitation to medieval and Renaissance buildings, Enlightenment utopian visions, modern industrial structures and skyscrapers, and contemporary sustainable practices.  Interwoven with a sampling of theoretical texts and architectural treatises, the course covers selected moments in the history and theory of Western architecture, from Vitruvius to Alberti and Corbusier to Koolhaas, from primordial shelters to computer generated designs.

Spring semester. Visiting Professor Koehler.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael R. Rice

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
ARCH-154-01-2122S
yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-154-01, ARCH-154-01, ASLC-154-01

(Offered as ARHA 154, ARCH 154, and ASLC 154) This introductory course surveys the architecture, painting, sculpture, textiles, and other arts of South Asia—including India, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka—from 2300 B.C. to the present. Among the diverse materials we will examine are the archaeological remains from one of the world’s earliest planned cities; Buddhist monastic complexes carved entirely out of living rock; Hindu temples bearing erotic images; manuscript illustrations made for Muslim emperors; colorful printed and painted textiles produced for domestic, European, Indonesian, and Japanese markets; and twentieth-century works of art that anticipate and respond to India’s independence from British colonial rule. We will consider the important roles that South Asian artists, architects, and other makers have played in depicting and housing the divine, establishing political and religious systems, and fueling the exchange of ideas and goods across the globe. Films, musical recordings, museum websites, visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections, and cooking and food-tasting sessions will supplement assigned readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.


Spring semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-202-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-202-01, ARHA-202-01

(Offered as ARCH 202 and ARHA 202) This seminar explores the emerging interdisciplinary field that combines the theory and practice of architecture and anthropology. We compare and contrast these two disciplines’ canonical methods, their ethical stances, and their primary subject matters (i.e., buildings and people). With that, we reflect upon the challenges of ethnoarchitecture as a new discipline, emphasizing the challenges of carrying out architectural research and/or construction work among people from cultural backgrounds different than the architect’s own. In general, this course invites critical thinking about the theory and practice of architecture, especially when it confronts issues of difference, including ethno-cultural and social class differences.

Recommended prior coursework: The course is open to everyone; previous instruction in architectural studies, area or ethnic studies, or social studies can be beneficial but is not mandatory.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rachael Chase

TTH 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-209-01-2122S
rchase@amherst.edu
ARCH-209-01, ARHA-209-01

(Offered as ARCH 209 and ARHA 209) This course will be a design investigation of sustainable architecture. Students will research cutting edge innovations in green technology and present their findings through graphic boards and verbal presentations. They will then design their own systems for water collection, air filtration, energy capture, site strategies, and solar power. A design language will be developed through a series of rigorous design exercises and creative innovation, and will culminate in a building project. Students will further develop sketching, drafting and model-making skills both by hand and with the computer. Guest critics will attend three reviews during the semester, and students will present their work to design professionals and professors.

Requisite: ARCH 105 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 12 students.

Spring semester. Visiting Lecturer Chase.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Utku B. Balaban

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-211-01-2122S
ubalaban@amherst.edu
SOCI-211-01, ARCH-211-01

(Offered as SOCI 211 and ARCH 211) All urban spaces are invented by the users of those spaces. Following this axiom, this course introduces the basic concepts and themes of urban space theories and then discusses these concepts and themes within the historical context of the invention of mental and physical urban spaces.

Reviewing the basic foundational notions of urban ecology, political economy, and urban planning, we will discuss contrasting urban utopias that underlie different spatial inventions from the nineteenth century and beyond. Then, we will move to ethnographic and historical works that focus on key urban spaces, including suburbia, social housing, slums/barrios/gecekondus, ghettoes, and global cities. We will also discuss the idea of whether the nation state itself is an urban space invented to contextualize other urban spaces.

Along with these discussions, we will review some of the important datasets on cities collected by key agencies and institutions such as GaWC and Eurostat Urban Audits. Students will use these materials to analyze urban spaces during the semester. Students will gain new skills to contemplate social relations through the prism of spatial dynamics and to investigate related empirical questions with the assistance of different data sources.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Visiting Associate Professor Balaban.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Trent E. Maxey

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-220-01-2122S
tmaxey@amherst.edu
ASLC-220-01, ARCH-220-01

(Offered as ASLC 220 and ARCH 220) Tokyo is the political, cultural, and economic center of Japan, the largest urban conglomeration on the planet, holding 35 million people, fully one-fifth of Japan’s population. Since its founding 400 years ago, when a small fishing village became Edo, the castle headquarters of the Tokugawa shoguns, the city has been reinvented multiple times—as the birthplace of Japan’s early modern urban bourgeois culture, imperial capital to a nation-state, center of modern consumer culture, postwar democratic exemplar, and postmodern metropolis. The class will focus on the portrayals of Tokyo and its reinventions in art, literature, and politics from the end of the Edo period to the present day. It will examine the changes that took place as the city modernized and Westernized in the Meiji era, became the center of modern urban life in Japan before the Second World War, and rebuilt itself as the center of the country’s economic miracle in the postwar era. As the largest human cultural creation in Japan, one that endured political upheavals, fires, earthquakes, fire-bombings and unbridled development, Tokyo has always been a complex subject. We will use that complexity to engage in interdisciplinary thinking and to consider a culture different than one’s own.

Preference to majors and students with an interest in urban studies. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professors Maxey and Morse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-258-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-258-01, ARCH-258-01, EUST-258-01

(Offered as ARHA 258, ARCH 258 and EUST 258) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to research on lived environments from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, the architecture that shaped them, and the art and objects that they contained. The goal of each class, through reading and discussion, is to investigate what a researchable question is in the fields of history, art history, architecture, and material culture in Europe, England, and the Americas. Using multi-disciplinary research strategies, we will examine the power of precious and ordinary objects (including furniture, tapestries, devotional paintings, family portraits, and sculpture), the contemporary connotations of their materiality, and consider what objects in a home might signify about a family’s status, political allegiance, spirituality, and place in the world. Further, we will ask how art, objects and décor shape the beholder’s experience of spaces inside and outside a residence, in private and in public. What does the display of objects in collections, including those from far-away cultures other than the patron’s, signify to the owner and the viewer? Visiting lecturers will present their ideas on various topics such as the anthropology of art, the significance of precious materials, and collecting. We will take field trips to museums and meet curators in order to identify a research topic.

This course will give students tools to conduct their own research into past lived environments and their contents, and identify how we in the 21st century might come to understand them. As the culmination of the course students will collaboratively develop a prospectus for a research project with one or two other classmates. Assignments to meet that goal include adding new content to Wikipedia as a record of students’ findings and a contribution to knowledge for a wider public.

Open to sophomores but also motivated first-years interested in research in a variety of fields. Limited to 18 students.

Spring semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-269-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-269-01, ARCH-269-01, EUST-269-01

(Offered as ARHA 269, ARCH 269, EUST 269) At the beginning of the seventeenth century, religious and social upheavals in Europe led to a renewed proliferation of exciting, innovative art. In this century of remarkably varied artistic production, paradoxes abounded. Artists sought the illusion of reality by imitating unimproved, even base or monstrous nature through close observation of the human body, landscape, and ordinary, humble objects of daily use. They imbued art meant to inspire religious devotion with unbounded eroticism or with the gory details of painful suffering and hideous death. Artists and architects made the visionary appear real and sensual. They adored the past but re-cast it in modern terms. Others continued to quest for perfection in a return to the lofty principles implicit in ancient artistic canons of ideality. More than ever before, artists explored the expression of passion through dramatic narratives and sharply revealing portraiture. They depicted dominating political leaders as flawed mortals—even satirized them through the new art of caricature—at the same time that they developed a potent and persuasive vocabulary in art, architecture, and gardens for the expression of the rulers’ absolutist political power.

This class will examine issues in Baroque art in depth through selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture produced by artists in the Catholic countries of the seventeenth century, e.g. Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, and Rubens in Italy, France, Spain, the Spanish Netherlands, and parts of the Americas. It also engages the cultural, social, and intellectual framework for their accomplishments. 

Intermediate level, one other course in art history preferred but not required. Uncapped.

Spring Semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Karen R. Koehler

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
ARHA-131-01-2122S
krkoehler@amherst.edu
ARHA-131-01, ARCH-131-01, EUST-131-01

(Offered as ARHA 131, ARCH 131 and EUST 131.) Throughout history, buildings have directed human activity, shaping social interactions, symbolizing political power, and influencing multiple kinds of artistic expression. This course is a selected introduction to the history and theory of architecture, from the earliest forms of human habitation to medieval and Renaissance buildings, Enlightenment utopian visions, modern industrial structures and skyscrapers, and contemporary sustainable practices.  Interwoven with a sampling of theoretical texts and architectural treatises, the course covers selected moments in the history and theory of Western architecture, from Vitruvius to Alberti and Corbusier to Koolhaas, from primordial shelters to computer generated designs.

Spring semester. Visiting Professor Koehler.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael R. Rice

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
ARHA-154-01-2122S
yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-154-01, ARCH-154-01, ASLC-154-01

(Offered as ARHA 154, ARCH 154, and ASLC 154) This introductory course surveys the architecture, painting, sculpture, textiles, and other arts of South Asia—including India, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka—from 2300 B.C. to the present. Among the diverse materials we will examine are the archaeological remains from one of the world’s earliest planned cities; Buddhist monastic complexes carved entirely out of living rock; Hindu temples bearing erotic images; manuscript illustrations made for Muslim emperors; colorful printed and painted textiles produced for domestic, European, Indonesian, and Japanese markets; and twentieth-century works of art that anticipate and respond to India’s independence from British colonial rule. We will consider the important roles that South Asian artists, architects, and other makers have played in depicting and housing the divine, establishing political and religious systems, and fueling the exchange of ideas and goods across the globe. Films, musical recordings, museum websites, visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections, and cooking and food-tasting sessions will supplement assigned readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.


Spring semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-202-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-202-01, ARHA-202-01

(Offered as ARCH 202 and ARHA 202) This seminar explores the emerging interdisciplinary field that combines the theory and practice of architecture and anthropology. We compare and contrast these two disciplines’ canonical methods, their ethical stances, and their primary subject matters (i.e., buildings and people). With that, we reflect upon the challenges of ethnoarchitecture as a new discipline, emphasizing the challenges of carrying out architectural research and/or construction work among people from cultural backgrounds different than the architect’s own. In general, this course invites critical thinking about the theory and practice of architecture, especially when it confronts issues of difference, including ethno-cultural and social class differences.

Recommended prior coursework: The course is open to everyone; previous instruction in architectural studies, area or ethnic studies, or social studies can be beneficial but is not mandatory.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rachael Chase

TTH 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-209-01-2122S
rchase@amherst.edu
ARCH-209-01, ARHA-209-01

(Offered as ARCH 209 and ARHA 209) This course will be a design investigation of sustainable architecture. Students will research cutting edge innovations in green technology and present their findings through graphic boards and verbal presentations. They will then design their own systems for water collection, air filtration, energy capture, site strategies, and solar power. A design language will be developed through a series of rigorous design exercises and creative innovation, and will culminate in a building project. Students will further develop sketching, drafting and model-making skills both by hand and with the computer. Guest critics will attend three reviews during the semester, and students will present their work to design professionals and professors.

Requisite: ARCH 105 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 12 students.

Spring semester. Visiting Lecturer Chase.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-258-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-258-01, ARCH-258-01, EUST-258-01

(Offered as ARHA 258, ARCH 258 and EUST 258) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to research on lived environments from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, the architecture that shaped them, and the art and objects that they contained. The goal of each class, through reading and discussion, is to investigate what a researchable question is in the fields of history, art history, architecture, and material culture in Europe, England, and the Americas. Using multi-disciplinary research strategies, we will examine the power of precious and ordinary objects (including furniture, tapestries, devotional paintings, family portraits, and sculpture), the contemporary connotations of their materiality, and consider what objects in a home might signify about a family’s status, political allegiance, spirituality, and place in the world. Further, we will ask how art, objects and décor shape the beholder’s experience of spaces inside and outside a residence, in private and in public. What does the display of objects in collections, including those from far-away cultures other than the patron’s, signify to the owner and the viewer? Visiting lecturers will present their ideas on various topics such as the anthropology of art, the significance of precious materials, and collecting. We will take field trips to museums and meet curators in order to identify a research topic.

This course will give students tools to conduct their own research into past lived environments and their contents, and identify how we in the 21st century might come to understand them. As the culmination of the course students will collaboratively develop a prospectus for a research project with one or two other classmates. Assignments to meet that goal include adding new content to Wikipedia as a record of students’ findings and a contribution to knowledge for a wider public.

Open to sophomores but also motivated first-years interested in research in a variety of fields. Limited to 18 students.

Spring semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-269-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-269-01, ARCH-269-01, EUST-269-01

(Offered as ARHA 269, ARCH 269, EUST 269) At the beginning of the seventeenth century, religious and social upheavals in Europe led to a renewed proliferation of exciting, innovative art. In this century of remarkably varied artistic production, paradoxes abounded. Artists sought the illusion of reality by imitating unimproved, even base or monstrous nature through close observation of the human body, landscape, and ordinary, humble objects of daily use. They imbued art meant to inspire religious devotion with unbounded eroticism or with the gory details of painful suffering and hideous death. Artists and architects made the visionary appear real and sensual. They adored the past but re-cast it in modern terms. Others continued to quest for perfection in a return to the lofty principles implicit in ancient artistic canons of ideality. More than ever before, artists explored the expression of passion through dramatic narratives and sharply revealing portraiture. They depicted dominating political leaders as flawed mortals—even satirized them through the new art of caricature—at the same time that they developed a potent and persuasive vocabulary in art, architecture, and gardens for the expression of the rulers’ absolutist political power.

This class will examine issues in Baroque art in depth through selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture produced by artists in the Catholic countries of the seventeenth century, e.g. Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, and Rubens in Italy, France, Spain, the Spanish Netherlands, and parts of the Americas. It also engages the cultural, social, and intellectual framework for their accomplishments. 

Intermediate level, one other course in art history preferred but not required. Uncapped.

Spring Semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael R. Rice

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
ASLC-154-01-2122S
yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-154-01, ARCH-154-01, ASLC-154-01

(Offered as ARHA 154, ARCH 154, and ASLC 154) This introductory course surveys the architecture, painting, sculpture, textiles, and other arts of South Asia—including India, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka—from 2300 B.C. to the present. Among the diverse materials we will examine are the archaeological remains from one of the world’s earliest planned cities; Buddhist monastic complexes carved entirely out of living rock; Hindu temples bearing erotic images; manuscript illustrations made for Muslim emperors; colorful printed and painted textiles produced for domestic, European, Indonesian, and Japanese markets; and twentieth-century works of art that anticipate and respond to India’s independence from British colonial rule. We will consider the important roles that South Asian artists, architects, and other makers have played in depicting and housing the divine, establishing political and religious systems, and fueling the exchange of ideas and goods across the globe. Films, musical recordings, museum websites, visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections, and cooking and food-tasting sessions will supplement assigned readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.


Spring semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Trent E. Maxey, Samuel C. Morse

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ASLC-220-01-2122S
tmaxey@amherst.edu scmorse@amherst.edu
ASLC-220-01, ARCH-220-01

(Offered as ASLC 220 and ARCH 220) Tokyo is the political, cultural, and economic center of Japan, the largest urban conglomeration on the planet, holding 35 million people, fully one-fifth of Japan’s population. Since its founding 400 years ago, when a small fishing village became Edo, the castle headquarters of the Tokugawa shoguns, the city has been reinvented multiple times—as the birthplace of Japan’s early modern urban bourgeois culture, imperial capital to a nation-state, center of modern consumer culture, postwar democratic exemplar, and postmodern metropolis. The class will focus on the portrayals of Tokyo and its reinventions in art, literature, and politics from the end of the Edo period to the present day. It will examine the changes that took place as the city modernized and Westernized in the Meiji era, became the center of modern urban life in Japan before the Second World War, and rebuilt itself as the center of the country’s economic miracle in the postwar era. As the largest human cultural creation in Japan, one that endured political upheavals, fires, earthquakes, fire-bombings and unbridled development, Tokyo has always been a complex subject. We will use that complexity to engage in interdisciplinary thinking and to consider a culture different than one’s own.

Preference to majors and students with an interest in urban studies. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professors Maxey and Morse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Karen R. Koehler

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
EUST-131-01-2122S
krkoehler@amherst.edu
ARHA-131-01, ARCH-131-01, EUST-131-01

(Offered as ARHA 131, ARCH 131 and EUST 131.) Throughout history, buildings have directed human activity, shaping social interactions, symbolizing political power, and influencing multiple kinds of artistic expression. This course is a selected introduction to the history and theory of architecture, from the earliest forms of human habitation to medieval and Renaissance buildings, Enlightenment utopian visions, modern industrial structures and skyscrapers, and contemporary sustainable practices.  Interwoven with a sampling of theoretical texts and architectural treatises, the course covers selected moments in the history and theory of Western architecture, from Vitruvius to Alberti and Corbusier to Koolhaas, from primordial shelters to computer generated designs.

Spring semester. Visiting Professor Koehler.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM

Amherst College
EUST-258-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-258-01, ARCH-258-01, EUST-258-01

(Offered as ARHA 258, ARCH 258 and EUST 258) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to research on lived environments from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, the architecture that shaped them, and the art and objects that they contained. The goal of each class, through reading and discussion, is to investigate what a researchable question is in the fields of history, art history, architecture, and material culture in Europe, England, and the Americas. Using multi-disciplinary research strategies, we will examine the power of precious and ordinary objects (including furniture, tapestries, devotional paintings, family portraits, and sculpture), the contemporary connotations of their materiality, and consider what objects in a home might signify about a family’s status, political allegiance, spirituality, and place in the world. Further, we will ask how art, objects and décor shape the beholder’s experience of spaces inside and outside a residence, in private and in public. What does the display of objects in collections, including those from far-away cultures other than the patron’s, signify to the owner and the viewer? Visiting lecturers will present their ideas on various topics such as the anthropology of art, the significance of precious materials, and collecting. We will take field trips to museums and meet curators in order to identify a research topic.

This course will give students tools to conduct their own research into past lived environments and their contents, and identify how we in the 21st century might come to understand them. As the culmination of the course students will collaboratively develop a prospectus for a research project with one or two other classmates. Assignments to meet that goal include adding new content to Wikipedia as a record of students’ findings and a contribution to knowledge for a wider public.

Open to sophomores but also motivated first-years interested in research in a variety of fields. Limited to 18 students.

Spring semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola M. Courtright

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
EUST-269-01-2122S
nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-269-01, ARCH-269-01, EUST-269-01

(Offered as ARHA 269, ARCH 269, EUST 269) At the beginning of the seventeenth century, religious and social upheavals in Europe led to a renewed proliferation of exciting, innovative art. In this century of remarkably varied artistic production, paradoxes abounded. Artists sought the illusion of reality by imitating unimproved, even base or monstrous nature through close observation of the human body, landscape, and ordinary, humble objects of daily use. They imbued art meant to inspire religious devotion with unbounded eroticism or with the gory details of painful suffering and hideous death. Artists and architects made the visionary appear real and sensual. They adored the past but re-cast it in modern terms. Others continued to quest for perfection in a return to the lofty principles implicit in ancient artistic canons of ideality. More than ever before, artists explored the expression of passion through dramatic narratives and sharply revealing portraiture. They depicted dominating political leaders as flawed mortals—even satirized them through the new art of caricature—at the same time that they developed a potent and persuasive vocabulary in art, architecture, and gardens for the expression of the rulers’ absolutist political power.

This class will examine issues in Baroque art in depth through selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture produced by artists in the Catholic countries of the seventeenth century, e.g. Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, and Rubens in Italy, France, Spain, the Spanish Netherlands, and parts of the Americas. It also engages the cultural, social, and intellectual framework for their accomplishments. 

Intermediate level, one other course in art history preferred but not required. Uncapped.

Spring Semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
EUST-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-380-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
GERM-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Utku B. Balaban

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
SOCI-211-01-2122S
ubalaban@amherst.edu
SOCI-211-01, ARCH-211-01

(Offered as SOCI 211 and ARCH 211) All urban spaces are invented by the users of those spaces. Following this axiom, this course introduces the basic concepts and themes of urban space theories and then discusses these concepts and themes within the historical context of the invention of mental and physical urban spaces.

Reviewing the basic foundational notions of urban ecology, political economy, and urban planning, we will discuss contrasting urban utopias that underlie different spatial inventions from the nineteenth century and beyond. Then, we will move to ethnographic and historical works that focus on key urban spaces, including suburbia, social housing, slums/barrios/gecekondus, ghettoes, and global cities. We will also discuss the idea of whether the nation state itself is an urban space invented to contextualize other urban spaces.

Along with these discussions, we will review some of the important datasets on cities collected by key agencies and institutions such as GaWC and Eurostat Urban Audits. Students will use these materials to analyze urban spaces during the semester. Students will gain new skills to contemplate social relations through the prism of spatial dynamics and to investigate related empirical questions with the assistance of different data sources.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Visiting Associate Professor Balaban.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

1
4.00

Karen Koehler

01:00PM-02:20PM TU;01:00PM-02:20PM TH

Hampshire College
334564

Adele Simmons Hall 221;Adele Simmons Hall 221

kkHACU@hampshire.edu
This course is an examination of visionary plans in architecture and art, including the works of C-N Ledoux, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Wassily Kandinsky, and others. The course begins with an examination of significant literary utopias, including the books by Sir Thomas More and William Morris, and we conclude with a work by Octavia Butler. We will consider the philosophical constructs of utopia in architectural drawings, buildings, and plans as well as in film, painting, sculpture, and the decorative arts. We will consider how different projections about life in the future are also harsh criticisms of the present, which often rely upon imagined views of social organizations in times past. We will examine the relationship of the individual to the community, and consider how spatial constructions - real and imagined - can affect this relationship. We examine the tensions between theory and practice, by studying the successes and failures of actual attempts at utopian communities. We will conclude with the question of whether utopian design is imaginable in the 21st century. keywords: Art, architecture, literature, history, philosophy
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Thomas Long

01:00PM-03:50PM TU;01:00PM-03:50PM TH

Hampshire College
334572

Cole Science Center 316;Cole Science Center 316

tlHA@hampshire.edu
This studio architecture course will be a digital design investigation into architecture and the built environment. In this course, students will develop and apply contemporary digital architectural skills, including sketches, plans, elevations, models, computer diagramming, and various modes of digital representation [TBD] to inter-disciplinary design problems. Students will explore a broad range of spatial concepts using digital mediums, including iterative, algorithmic and emergent design philosophies. The objective of the course is to solve unique architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form and space through rigorous, open-ended, and creative computer-based design work. Recommended: Students are encouraged to have taken one architectural design studio before enrolling in this course. Keywords: Architecture, Design, Technology, Digital, Studio
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Thomas Long

09:00AM-11:50AM TU;09:00AM-11:50AM TH

Hampshire College
334579

Emily Dickinson Hall 3;Emily Dickinson Hall 3

tlHA@hampshire.edu
This course is geared toward Division III students and Five College seniors completing or anticipating advanced architectural or other design studio projects. The Advanced Architecture + Design Lab course provides a structured and critical creative environment for students to explore, experiment and design in both an individual and collaborative studio setting. In this course, students will develop their own individual design projects, identifying their own approach, scope and thesis, then executing their creative acts throughout the semester. As a concentrator's course, students will be expected to engage in both the creative challenges presented by the course while working on their own independent semester-long projects. This course is highly interdisciplinary in nature, yet designed for students developing projects in various areas of graphic design, industrial design, environmental studies, architecture, and urban planning. This course will be marked by a brief, intense reading and discussion period, followed by both writing and design production on topics both culled from our readings and individual student projects. This course requires substantial out-of-class studio work and commitments to a rigorous schedule of production, culminating in a collective exhibition at the end of the semester. Students must have an individual project in mind or in progress at the start of the term. For non-Hampshire students, students should have an established work methodology and have taken several studios in art or architectural design. Students will develop work for a collective exhibition at the end of the semester. Division II Hampshire students are welcome if space permits. Instructor Permission Required--Priority for acceptance will be given to upper-level students; Contact Thom Long at tlong@hampshire.edu for details. Keywords: Design, Architecture, Concentrator, Capstone, Studio
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

1
4.00

Christina Cianfrani

01:00PM-02:20PM M;01:00PM-02:20PM W

Hampshire College
334530

R.W. Kern Center 202;R.W. Kern Center 202

ccNS@hampshire.edu
334530,334533
This course will use a natural science lens to explore the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals with a specific focus on the food-water-energy nexus. We will explore the implementation of the goals on a global scale as well as efforts underway locally and regionally. Students in this class will read primary literature, complete case studies, work collaboratively and independently on sustainability projects and actively participate in small group and class discussions and activities. We will use elements of the Hampshire College campus living laboratory as points of discussion, taking fields trips when possible, including: the net zero energy/water living building, the solar array and the college farm center. Keywords: environmental science, geoscience, sustainability
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Naomi Darling

MW 08:45AM-11:15AM;MW 08:45AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116331

Art 305;Art 306

ndarling@mtholyoke.edu
This studio course introduces a series of design investigations around particular themes and approaches to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop visual communication and architectural design skills (sketches, plans, elevations, sections, projected drawings and model making) to tackle interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural and design issues involving site, inhabitation, function, form, materiality, light and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Naomi Darling

MW 01:30PM-04:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116332

Prospect Hall 039

ndarling@mtholyoke.edu
The rise of digital fabrication processes has blurred the traditional division of labor enabling architects and designers not only to draw but to also fabricate projects, often using the very same programs. Following the rise in CAD/CAM has been a burgeoning Maker movement as more and more individuals have rediscovered the joys (and sometimes frustrations) of realizing projects within a collaborative environment. This class will introduce students to both traditional and digital making through a series of exercises that will enable students to realize projects using the facilities of the Fimbel Lab.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Jessica Maier

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116354
jmaier@mtholyoke.edu
This course surveys architecture from the ancient world to the present as both a functional response to human activity and as a medium that expresses cultural values. In the service of domestic life, religious ritual, political agendas, commerce, and leisure, architecture reflects and shapes the natural environment, technology, economics, and aesthetic taste. While the history of Western architecture constitutes the primary touchstone, we will pursue themes that include sites and buildings, cities, and sites from around the world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jessica Maier

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116337
jmaier@mtholyoke.edu
This class turns away from the conventional Eurocentric narrative of the Renaissance, reframing it as a time when exploration and cross-cultural encounters inspired a rich and varied array of art, architecture, and sculpture. The objects we will examine include world maps from Europe and China, West African ivories, Benin bronzes, Indian miniatures, Islamic metalwork, Mexican feather paintings, Aztec cartography, colonial Latin American buildings and murals, as well as European paintings and illustrated books. All of these items speak to expanding networks of trade and conquest. Collectively, they show just how global and connected the Renaissance world really was.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Katherine Kreindler,Jessica Maier

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
116338
jmaier@mtholyoke.edu
116338,116702
The world's first large, vibrant, and developed cities arose in antiquity, fundamentally changing the lives of those who inhabited these ancient urban centers. Cities became places not only with large populations, but also economic and religious centers, venues in which the powerful could communicate their authority, and loci of social change. This course introduces the urban centers of the ancient Middle East, Egypt, and Mediterranean and also interrogates processes of urbanization and how urbanization affected residents of ancient cities. The city will be the lens through which we will investigate ancient politics, religion, social organizations, and cultures. We will study cities as dynamic environments, as places that were constructed by people but that also influenced the people inhabiting them. To accomplish these goals, we will make extensive use of archaeological evidence and will closely examine the public spaces, religious structures, houses, and infrastructures constructed in ancient cities. This course will begin with some of the earliest cities on earth, in Mesopotamia and Egypt, then will progress to cities of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, and will culminate with the creation of Christian cities in late antiquity.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ajay Sinha

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116339
asinha@mtholyoke.edu
The course is organized around small material objects that allude to monumental architecture in different periods and regions of Asia: real and imaginary buildings unfolding into reliquary shrines in Buddhist Central Asia, portable liturgical objects in Islamic West Asia, funerary lanterns and architectural models in Chinese tombs, and Persian and Indian miniature paintings that are themselves compartmentalized as architectural enclosures. We will read scholarly articles critically, research and write collaboratively, and experience the wonders of scale-shift from architecture to hand-held things by visiting the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum and making "archimorphic" objects in the Fimbel Maker and Innovation Lab.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Barbara A. Kellum

M W 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
ARH-216-01-202203

Hillyer Graham

bkellum@smith.edu
From North Africa to Gaul, from the Pillars of Hercules (Straits of Gibraltar) to Asia Minor, the interrelationships of art and power in the visual culture of the ethnically diverse Roman empire, from the first century B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E., are the subject of study. We also examine works of art from later periods as well as literature and film that structure our perception of the Roman world. Group A, Counts for ARU
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Dana Leibsohn

TU 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
ARH-280cv-01-202203

Hillyer 103

dleibsoh@smith.edu
How does conquest by foreigners change the ways that images, civic spaces and objects are created and used? What kinds of hybrids does colonization produce? Is it possible to describe what is “colonial” about art or architecture? Focusing on recent scholarship, this seminar addresses these queries, highlighting the 16th–19th centuries. Among the topics we consider are interpretive work in the field of “colonial studies,” the mapping and construction of colonial spaces, exchanges that brought people and objects into contact (and conflict) with one another, how colonialism can shape the meaning of objects, and the nationalist histories of colonial projects. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rosa Weinberg

TU TH 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARS-381-01-202203

Hillyer 106

rweinberg@smith.edu
This research-based design studio will investigate how a nature-based approach that questions the separation between natural and human environments might help us build climate resilience. In particular, we will study how beavers (like humans) have an outsized effect on their landscapes. The beaver population has recently rebounded after centuries of trapping and increasingly has come into conflict with humans. At the same time, their dams create wetlands that raise water tables, produce habitats for thousands of species, serve as firebreaks for wildfires, and sequester carbon. We will consider how built environments and wetlands can coexist in overlapping, rather than separate ecosystems. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: ARS 280 and ARS 281. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

TU TH 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARS-389-01-202203
rbertone@smith.edu
LSS 389-01, ARS 389-01
Offered as LSS 389 and ARS 389. This class is for students who have taken introductory landscape studios and are interested in exploring more sophisticated projects. It is also for architecture and urbanism majors who have a strong interest in landscape architecture or urban design. In a design studio format, the students analyze and propose interventions for the built environment on a broad scale, considering multiple factors (including ecological, economic, political, sociological and historical) in their engagement of the site. The majority of the semester is spent working on one complex project. Students use digital tools as well as traditional design media and physical model building within a liberal arts-based conceptual studio that encourages extensive research and in-depth theoretic inquiry. Previous studio experience and two architecture and /or landscape studies courses suggested. Priority given to LSS minors and ARU majors. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

M 2:45 PM - 4:25 PM

Smith College
LSS-100-01-202203
rbertone@smith.edu
Through readings and a series of lectures by Smith faculty and guests, we examine the history and influences out of which landscape studies is emerging. We look at the relationship of this new field with literary and cultural studies, art, art history, landscape architecture, history, biological and environmental sciences. What is landscape studies? Where does it come from? Why is it important? How does it relate to, for instance, landscape painting and city planning? How does it link political and aesthetic agendas? What is its role in current sustainability debates and initiatives among architects, landscape architects, planners and engineers? Students may take this course twice for credit. S/U only.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Thomas Moga

M W 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
LSS-245-01-202203
smoga@smith.edu
Photography and landscape are intertwined. Scholars, design professionals, artists, and journalists use photographs as evidence, as a means of representing sites, as a design tool, as source material for project renderings, and as documentation. This course focuses on how photography is a part of field observations and research techniques, how photographs are used in landscape studies, and how text and image are combined in different photographic and scholarly genres. Students will take photographs and examine the photographs of landscape architects, urbanists, artists, and journalists. Field exercises are combined with workshops, discussions, and research at the Smith College Museum of Art. Enrollment limited to 15.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

TU TH 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
LSS-389-01-202203
rbertone@smith.edu
LSS 389-01, ARS 389-01
Offered as LSS 389 and ARS 389. This class is for students who have taken introductory landscape studios and are interested in exploring more sophisticated projects. It is also for architecture and urbanism majors who have a strong interest in landscape architecture or urban design. In a design studio format, the students analyze and propose interventions for the built environment on a broad scale, considering multiple factors (including ecological, economic, political, sociological and historical) in their engagement of the site. The majority of the semester is spent working on one complex project. Students use digital tools as well as traditional design media and physical model building within a liberal arts-based conceptual studio that encourages extensive research and in-depth theoretic inquiry. Previous studio experience and two architecture and /or landscape studies courses suggested. Priority given to LSS minors and ARU majors. Enrollment limited to 14. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Eldra Walker

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
26149

South College Room W245

eldrawalker@umass.edu
26153
This lecture investigates the history of global cities, with an emphasis on the twentieth and twenty first centuries. Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Ann Marshall

M W 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
26132

Design Building Room 480

awmarshall@umass.edu
Several complex design projects selected and explored from commercial, institutional, hospitality and retail perspectives. Interdisciplinary and/or large-scale team projects are undertaken. Emphasis placed on individual design approach illustrating student's strengths. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BS-Arch majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
5.00

Stephen Schreiber

M W 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
26133

Design Building Room 480

schreiber@umass.edu
Several complex design projects selected and explored from commercial, institutional, hospitality and retail perspectives. Interdisciplinary and/or large-scale team projects are undertaken. Emphasis placed on individual design approach illustrating student's strengths. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BS-Arch majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
5.00

M W 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
26157

Design Building Room 480

Several complex design projects selected and explored from commercial, institutional, hospitality and retail perspectives. Interdisciplinary and/or large-scale team projects are undertaken. Emphasis placed on individual design approach illustrating student's strengths. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BS-Arch majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
6.00

Erika Zekos

M W 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
26124

Design Building Room 480

ezekos@umass.edu
In this studio, students will explore critical, participatory, and process-focused strategies for community based design practices - to consider how the agents with whom we design, and the practices with which we engage them, shapes, alters, and informs our processes, our outcomes, and our larger professional practice. There will be a strong emphasis on linking the professional and theoretical underpinnings of community-focused, participatory architectural practice. Students will explore the history and context of socially engaged design practice, and participate in hands-on design projects with real impacts for a local community organization through both independent and collaborative work.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Jordan Kanter

M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
38082

John Olver Design Bldg Rm 221

jkanter@umass.edu
This course will examine the material history of wood frame construction in the United States, with a particular focus on residential construction and the single family house. This will include an investigation of the wood frame from the perspective of detailing and construction, as well as an exploration of the broader assemblage of social, technological, economic, and environmental forces that extend from its use. Particular attention will be paid to the ways wood framing and the single family house has served as a site for reordering the American landscape, including patterns of urban development, the relationship between the city and nature, and the dynamics of domestic life.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
6.00

Theodore Eisenman,Carolina Aragon

M W F 1:25PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
31472

Design Building Room 370

teisenman@umass.educaragon@larp.umass.edu
Landscape planning crosses scales from regional to site specific, taking a real world problem to creative sustainable solutions. An introduction to design research methods, inventory and assessment models and techniques for policy planning, regional scale design proposals, and site selection for particular development types. Implementation of a greenway solution. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BS-LdArch majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Ethan Carr

TU TH 5:30PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
31413

Integ. Learning Center S140

ecarr@umass.edu
36025
Completes the survey begun in LANDARCH 543. Covers the Renaissance to the present.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Robert Ryan

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
31474

John Olver Design Bldg Rm 221

rlryan@larp.umass.edu
Green infrastructure planning requires a systems approach to improving ecological function while providing vital ecosystem services for human populations. This course will introduce students to the concepts, theories, and applications of green infrastructure planning at multiple scales, including the site-level, neighborhood, and regional scales. Topic areas include hydrology, ecology, . transportation, and other systems. Case studies will be used to examine green infrastructure projects both domestically and internationally from a planning and policy perspective, as well as implementation. An integrated final project will allow students to apply course material for a green infrastructure plan.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Carolina Aragon

M W 9:05AM 10:20AM

UMass Amherst
31483

Design Building Room 370

caragon@larp.umass.edu
This course will introduce students to innovative materials and technologies in landscape architecture. The study of landscape materiality will take place in two major forms: through a survey of contemporary material technologies, and through direct experimentation with the materials. The range of materials and technologies will be broad, ranging in subjects from upcycling, to smart materials, those with the potential to transform energy found in the environment into usable forms (i.e. electricity). The goal of the course is to generate prototypes and ideas that foster design innovation in landscape architecture.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Mark Hamin

M W 11:15AM 12:30PM

UMass Amherst
34817

John Olver Design Bldg Rm 225

mhamin@larp.umass.edu
This course introduces students to the 3-E concept of sustainability: environment, economy, equity, and applies it to the built environment and policies at the municipal and regional level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michael DiPasquale

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
36033

Integ. Learning Center N 111

dipasquale@umass.edu
How the built environment is shaped by humans. The forces that go into developing human settlements, how these environments change, how different groups experience the environment, and how environmental designers work within this context. (Gen.Ed. I)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mark Hamin

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
36026

Integ. Learning Center S140

mhamin@larp.umass.edu
This course focuses on the historical and multicultural roots of the sustainability framework within a global context, critically examining interrelationship of ecology, economy, social equity, and community engagement as they have influenced divergent changes in quality of life across time and space, natural as well as human. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Ethan Carr

TU TH 5:30PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
36025

Integ. Learning Center S140

ecarr@umass.edu
31413

Contact Us

Program Co-Chairs:

Thom Long, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design, Hampshire College

Gabriel Arboleda, Assistant Professor of Art and the History of Art and Architectural Studies, Amherst College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator

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