Architectural Studies

The Five College Architectural Studies Program embraces the complexity of the process and practice of architecture and attempts to convey—to students and to the community—the many sides of design.

What is architecture? The objective of the Five College Architectural Studies program is to cultivate concerned architectural designers and thinkers through a flexible yet rigorous interdisciplinary course of study. Our cross-disciplinary approach to architectural education introduces students to a multitude of ways of thinking about design in history, in theory and in the studio. The program encourages students to explore a broad cross-section of courses—both in and beyond the architecture discipline of architecture across the Five Colleges—and introduces students to a diverse collection of faculty members, methodologies and design approaches.

The Five College Architectural Studies program encourages a serious commitment to the study and practice of architecture. It also opens students to discovering the ways in which architecture effects change in—and is affected by—its surrounding environment. Students are strongly encouraged to explore, study and analyze elements of the design process, including urban fabrics, social structures, environmental systems and economics of building. While immersed in a diverse cross-section of courses in a multitude of disciplines, students are encouraged to identify and develop their individual role as designers and thinkers. The impact of their actions on an individual, community and national level are probed.

The Five College architecture program embraces the complexity of the process and practice of architecture and attempts to convey—to students and to the community—the many sides of design. We explore architecture through: art, technology, environmental studies, history, theory, psychology, physiology, physics, media design, sociology, semiologylinguistics, politics, science and math; we consider creative modes of operation while we look at creativity, patterns, actions, weight, power, force, light, memory, time, sound, color, language, programming, syntax, form, environment, resources, humanity, struggle, infrastructure, consciousness, perception, networks, materials, transport, commodities, community, marketing, family, public-ness and private-ness. Students will find a personal connection to architecture by investigating the many ways in which the built environment impacts their lives and the ways in which they as students of architectural history, theory and practice might, in turn, change that world.

Faculty

Nicola M. Courtright
Professor of the History of Art and European Studies and Chair of Architectural Studies, Amherst College
nmcourtright@amherst.edu

Heidi Gilpin
Associate Professor of German, Amherst College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
hgilpin@amherst.edu

Ronald C. Rosbottom
Winifred L. Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Professor of French and European Studies, Amherst College
rcrosbottom@amherst.edu

Gabriel Arboleda 
Assistant Professor, Sustainable Architecture, Amherst College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
arboleda@amherst.edu

Polina Barskova
Associate Professor, Russian Literature and Film and Urban Studies, Hampshire College
pbHA@hampshire.edu

Myrna Breitbart
Professor Emerita, Geography and Urban Studies, Hampshire College
mmbSS@hampshire.edu

Karen Koehler
Professor, Architectural and Art History, Hampshire College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
kkHACU@hampshire.edu

Thom Long
Associate Professor, Architecture and Design, Hampshire College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
tlHA@hampshire.edu

James Miller
Professor Emeritus, Communications, Hampshire College
jrmCCS@hampshire.edu

Michael T. Davis
Professor of Art History and Architecture (Medieval, Modern, Islamic) and Chair, Architectural Studies Program, Mount Holyoke College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
mtdavis@mtholyoke.edu

Jessica Maier
Associate Professor of Art History and Architecture (Early modern, Baroque, History of maps), Mount Holyoke College
jmaier@mtholyoke.edu

Ajay Sinha
Professor of Art History and Architecture (Indian art, Asian art, Indian films), Mount Holyoke College
asinha@mtholyoke.edu

Joseph Smith
Professor Emeritus of Art (Studio art and sculpture), Mount Holyoke College
smithj@mtholyoke.edu

Paul Staiti
Professor of Art History and Architecture (American art, cultural history, film studies), Mount Holyoke College
pstaiti@mtholyoke.edu

Brigitte Buettner
Louise Ines Doyle 1934 Professor of Art, Smith College
bbuettne@smith.edu

Barbara Kellum 
Professor of Art, Smith College

Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
bkellum@email.smith.edu  

Dana Leibsohn
Alice Pratt Brown Professor of Art, Smith College
dleibsoh@smith.edu

Elisa Kim
Assistant Professor of Architectural Studies, Smith College
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
emkim@smith.edu

John Moore
Professor of Art, Smith College
jmoore@smith.edu

Frazer Ward
Professor of Art, Associate Chair of the Department, Smith College
fward@smith.edu

Caryn Brause
AIA LEED-AP
Associate Professor, Architecture & Design, UMass Amherst
cjbrause@art.umass.edu

Carey Clouse
Associate Professor, Architecture and Landscape Architecture, UMass Amherst
clouse@art.umass.edu

Naomi Darling
Assistant Professor, Sustainable Architecture, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
mndHA@hampshire.edu

Joseph Krupczynski
Associate Professor, Art & Architecture History
josephk@art.umass.edu  

Kathleen Lugosch
Professor, Art, Architecture, Art History, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee 
lugosch@art.umass.edu  

Ray Kinoshita Mann
Associate Professor, Architecture Committee Chair, Art & Art History, UMass Amherst
rkmann@art.umass.edu  

Max Page
Professor, Art, Architecture & Art History, Graduate Program Director of Historic Preservation, UMass Amherst
mpage@umass.edu  

Sigrid Miller Pollin
Professor Emerita, Art, Architecture & Art History, UMass Amherst
smillerp@art.umass.edu
  

Pari Riahi
Assistant Professor, Architecture Department, UMass Amherst
priahi@umass.edu

Stephen Schreiber
Professor and Program Director, Architecture + Design, UMass Amherst
Member of the 5 College Architectural Studies Committee
schreiber@umass.edu  

The Major

About the Major

Amherst College, Hampshire College and Mount Holyoke College participate in the Five College Architectural Studies (FCAS) major. The major includes nine courses, plus a capstone semester in the senior year. Students are required to take four foundation courses focused on architectural history and design, and five intermediate courses (in their sophomore and junior years) to be determined with their advisor, in which they develop their particular field of concentration. In the senior year, students are required to complete a capstone project; this can be pursued in the context of an already existing course, or in an independent study course.

Declaring the Major

In order to be admitted to the Five College major program, each student (in close consultation with one or more of the program advisors) will put together a proposed plan of study including a statement of purpose and a list of projected courses, to be evaluated by a review committee made up of representative members of the FCAS faculty. Applications will be reviewed twice per year. The progress of the major, and any possible rerouting or changes in direction, can be made in consultation with the campus advisor, who will consult with the FCAS committee as necessary. Students can propose to join the major at any time during their first, second or third years—but their proposed concentration and eight of the required courses must be completed by the end of their junior year.

The Capstone Project

The required semester-long capstone project can be in any area of architectural studies, and might be a design project, research paper, exhibition/installation or urban plan; it may take any number of creative forms and formats. When the required courses are met, each student will submit a proposal describing the specific capstone topic, working project outline and research strategies, and include a significant working bibliography. This proposal will be read and evaluated by the FCAS faculty committee.

Please contact your advisor for more information about how the major works at your school or email us at fcas@fivecolleges.edu.

Courses

Fall 2021 Architectural Studies Courses

01
4.00

Rachael Cohen

TTH 01:00PM-04:00PM

Amherst College
ARCH-105-01-2122F

FAYE 303

rchase@amherst.edu
ARCH-105-01,ARHA-105-01

(Offered as ARCH 105 and ARHA 105) This hands-on design studio will foster innovation as it guides students through the development of conceptual architecture. Through a series of projects that build on each other, students will develop their own design language and experiment with architecture at several scales - from an interior screen that plays with light, shadow and color, to a dynamic built structure and its integration into a site. We will work through both hand-drafted and computer drawings, as well as physical model-making to understand plan, section, and elevations as well as diagramming and concept models. Guest critics will attend three reviews during the semester, and students will present their work to design professionals and professors.

No prior architecture experience is necessary, but a willingness to experiment and a desire to learn through making are essential.

Admissions with consent of the instructor. Limited to 12 students. Fall semester. Visiting Lecturer Chase.

 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Nicola Courtright

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
ARCH-135-01-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135-01,ARCH-135-01,EUST-135-01

(Offered as ARHA 135, ARCH 135, and EUST 135) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history, introduces the ways that artists and architects imaginatively invented visual language to interpret the world for contemporary patrons, viewers, and citizens in early modern Europe. Painters, printmakers, sculptors and architects in Italy, France, Spain, Germany and the Netherlands created new ways of seeing empirical phenomena and interpreting them, by means of both ancient and new principles of art, science and philosophy and through powerful engagement with the senses. They produced godlike illusions of nature, from grand frescoes bursting from the walls of papal residences to spectacular gardens covering noble estates in Baroque France and colonializing England. They fundamentally altered the design of major cities such as Rome and Paris so that the visitor encountered an entirely new urban experience than ever before. Along the way, they learned from one another’s example, but, prizing innovation, sought fiercely to surpass previous generations, and argued at length about values in art. They contributed to fashioning an ideal picture of empire and society and conjured the dazzling wealth and power of those who paid them. But as time passed, some came to ironize the social order mightily, and some elevated beggars, farmers, servants, so-called fools, and bourgeois women leading seemingly mundane domestic lives as much as others praised the prosperous few. Finally, artists actively participated in the overthrow of the monarchy during the French Revolution and yet also passionately critiqued the violence of war it engendered. Throughout, the course will investigate how concepts of progress, civilization, the state, religion, race, gender, and the individual came to be defined through art.

The goals of the course are:
above all, to achieve the skill of close looking to gain visual understanding;
• also, to identify artistic innovations that characterize European art and architecture from the Italian Renaissance to the French Revolution;
• to understand how images are unique forms of expression that help us to understand historical phenomena;
• to situate the works of art historically, by examining the intellectual, political, religious, and social currents that contributed to their creation;
• to read texts about the period critically and analytically.
No previous experience with art or art history is necessary. 

Fall semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Nicola Courtright

T 03:00PM-03:50PM

Amherst College
ARCH-135F-01-2122F

MEAD 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-01,ARCH-135F-01,EUST-135F-01

02
0.00

Nicola Courtright

W 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
ARCH-135F-02-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-02,ARCH-135F-02,EUST-135F-02

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARCH-152-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Karen Koehler

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARCH-159-01-2122F

FAYE 115

krkoehler@amherst.edu
ARHA-159-01,ARCH-159-01

(Offered as ARHA 159 and ARCH 159) This course is an examination of the emergence, development, and dissolution of European modernist art, architecture and design. The course begins with the innovations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, created in consort with the growth of modern urbanism, colonialist politics, and psychological experimentation. Distinctions between the terms modernity, modernism, and the avant-garde will be explored as we unpack the complex equations between art, politics, and social change in the first half of the twentieth century. Covering selected groups (such as Expressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism, l'Esprit Nouveau, Bauhaus, and Constructivism), this course will consider themes such as mechanical reproduction, nihilism, nationalism, consumerism, and primitivism as they are disclosed in the making and reception of modernist art and architecture.

Fall semester. Visiting Professor Koehler.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel Arboleda

TTH 11:30AM-12:50PM

Amherst College
ARCH-205-01-2122F

OCTA 200

garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-205-01,ARHA-205-01

(Offered as ARCH 205 and ARHA 205) This theory seminar aims to provide students with a strong basis for a deep engagement with the practice of sustainability in architectural design. The studied material covers both canonical literature on green design and social science-based critical theory. We start by exploring the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and how these tenets materialize in practice. Then, we examine sustainable design in relation to issues such as inequality and marginality. As we do this, we locate sustainability within the larger environmental movement, studying in detail some of the main approaches and standards of sustainable design, the attempts to improve this practice over time, and the specific challenges confronting these attempts. In addition to reading discussions, we study our subject through student presentations and written responses, a field trip, and two graphic design exercises.

Recommended prior coursework: The course is open to everyone, but students would benefit from having a previous engagement with a course in architectural design, architectural history and/or theory, introduction to architectural studies, or environmental studies.

Limited to 20 students. Fall Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Gabriel Arboleda

MW 01:30PM-02:50PM

Amherst College
ARHA-101-01-2122F

OCTA 200

garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-101-01,ARHA-101-01

(Offered as ARCH 101 and ARHA 101) This introductory course focuses on the tools used to communicate and discuss ideas in architectural practice and theory. We study both the practical, from sketching to parallel drawing, to the theoretical, from historical to critical perspectives. Connecting both, we cover the formal analysis elements necessary to “read” and critique built works. Class activities include field trips, guest presentations, sketching and drawing, small design exercises, discussion of readings, and short written responses. Through these activities, at the end of the semester the student will understand in general terms what the dealings and challenges of architecture as a discipline are.

Limited to 20 students. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Rachael Cohen

TTH 01:00PM-04:00PM

Amherst College
ARHA-105-01-2122F

FAYE 303

rchase@amherst.edu
ARCH-105-01,ARHA-105-01

(Offered as ARCH 105 and ARHA 105) This hands-on design studio will foster innovation as it guides students through the development of conceptual architecture. Through a series of projects that build on each other, students will develop their own design language and experiment with architecture at several scales - from an interior screen that plays with light, shadow and color, to a dynamic built structure and its integration into a site. We will work through both hand-drafted and computer drawings, as well as physical model-making to understand plan, section, and elevations as well as diagramming and concept models. Guest critics will attend three reviews during the semester, and students will present their work to design professionals and professors.

No prior architecture experience is necessary, but a willingness to experiment and a desire to learn through making are essential.

Admissions with consent of the instructor. Limited to 12 students. Fall semester. Visiting Lecturer Chase.

 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Nicola Courtright

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
ARHA-135-01-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135-01,ARCH-135-01,EUST-135-01

(Offered as ARHA 135, ARCH 135, and EUST 135) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history, introduces the ways that artists and architects imaginatively invented visual language to interpret the world for contemporary patrons, viewers, and citizens in early modern Europe. Painters, printmakers, sculptors and architects in Italy, France, Spain, Germany and the Netherlands created new ways of seeing empirical phenomena and interpreting them, by means of both ancient and new principles of art, science and philosophy and through powerful engagement with the senses. They produced godlike illusions of nature, from grand frescoes bursting from the walls of papal residences to spectacular gardens covering noble estates in Baroque France and colonializing England. They fundamentally altered the design of major cities such as Rome and Paris so that the visitor encountered an entirely new urban experience than ever before. Along the way, they learned from one another’s example, but, prizing innovation, sought fiercely to surpass previous generations, and argued at length about values in art. They contributed to fashioning an ideal picture of empire and society and conjured the dazzling wealth and power of those who paid them. But as time passed, some came to ironize the social order mightily, and some elevated beggars, farmers, servants, so-called fools, and bourgeois women leading seemingly mundane domestic lives as much as others praised the prosperous few. Finally, artists actively participated in the overthrow of the monarchy during the French Revolution and yet also passionately critiqued the violence of war it engendered. Throughout, the course will investigate how concepts of progress, civilization, the state, religion, race, gender, and the individual came to be defined through art.

The goals of the course are:
above all, to achieve the skill of close looking to gain visual understanding;
• also, to identify artistic innovations that characterize European art and architecture from the Italian Renaissance to the French Revolution;
• to understand how images are unique forms of expression that help us to understand historical phenomena;
• to situate the works of art historically, by examining the intellectual, political, religious, and social currents that contributed to their creation;
• to read texts about the period critically and analytically.
No previous experience with art or art history is necessary. 

Fall semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Nicola Courtright

T 03:00PM-03:50PM

Amherst College
ARHA-135F-01-2122F

MEAD 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-01,ARCH-135F-01,EUST-135F-01

02
0.00

Nicola Courtright

W 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
ARHA-135F-02-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-02,ARCH-135F-02,EUST-135F-02

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARHA-152-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Karen Koehler

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARHA-159-01-2122F

FAYE 115

krkoehler@amherst.edu
ARHA-159-01,ARCH-159-01

(Offered as ARHA 159 and ARCH 159) This course is an examination of the emergence, development, and dissolution of European modernist art, architecture and design. The course begins with the innovations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, created in consort with the growth of modern urbanism, colonialist politics, and psychological experimentation. Distinctions between the terms modernity, modernism, and the avant-garde will be explored as we unpack the complex equations between art, politics, and social change in the first half of the twentieth century. Covering selected groups (such as Expressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism, l'Esprit Nouveau, Bauhaus, and Constructivism), this course will consider themes such as mechanical reproduction, nihilism, nationalism, consumerism, and primitivism as they are disclosed in the making and reception of modernist art and architecture.

Fall semester. Visiting Professor Koehler.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel Arboleda

TTH 11:30AM-12:50PM

Amherst College
ARHA-205-01-2122F

OCTA 200

garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-205-01,ARHA-205-01

(Offered as ARCH 205 and ARHA 205) This theory seminar aims to provide students with a strong basis for a deep engagement with the practice of sustainability in architectural design. The studied material covers both canonical literature on green design and social science-based critical theory. We start by exploring the key tenets of the sustainable design discourse, and how these tenets materialize in practice. Then, we examine sustainable design in relation to issues such as inequality and marginality. As we do this, we locate sustainability within the larger environmental movement, studying in detail some of the main approaches and standards of sustainable design, the attempts to improve this practice over time, and the specific challenges confronting these attempts. In addition to reading discussions, we study our subject through student presentations and written responses, a field trip, and two graphic design exercises.

Recommended prior coursework: The course is open to everyone, but students would benefit from having a previous engagement with a course in architectural design, architectural history and/or theory, introduction to architectural studies, or environmental studies.

Limited to 20 students. Fall Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ASLC-142-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicola Courtright

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
EUST-135-01-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135-01,ARCH-135-01,EUST-135-01

(Offered as ARHA 135, ARCH 135, and EUST 135) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history, introduces the ways that artists and architects imaginatively invented visual language to interpret the world for contemporary patrons, viewers, and citizens in early modern Europe. Painters, printmakers, sculptors and architects in Italy, France, Spain, Germany and the Netherlands created new ways of seeing empirical phenomena and interpreting them, by means of both ancient and new principles of art, science and philosophy and through powerful engagement with the senses. They produced godlike illusions of nature, from grand frescoes bursting from the walls of papal residences to spectacular gardens covering noble estates in Baroque France and colonializing England. They fundamentally altered the design of major cities such as Rome and Paris so that the visitor encountered an entirely new urban experience than ever before. Along the way, they learned from one another’s example, but, prizing innovation, sought fiercely to surpass previous generations, and argued at length about values in art. They contributed to fashioning an ideal picture of empire and society and conjured the dazzling wealth and power of those who paid them. But as time passed, some came to ironize the social order mightily, and some elevated beggars, farmers, servants, so-called fools, and bourgeois women leading seemingly mundane domestic lives as much as others praised the prosperous few. Finally, artists actively participated in the overthrow of the monarchy during the French Revolution and yet also passionately critiqued the violence of war it engendered. Throughout, the course will investigate how concepts of progress, civilization, the state, religion, race, gender, and the individual came to be defined through art.

The goals of the course are:
above all, to achieve the skill of close looking to gain visual understanding;
• also, to identify artistic innovations that characterize European art and architecture from the Italian Renaissance to the French Revolution;
• to understand how images are unique forms of expression that help us to understand historical phenomena;
• to situate the works of art historically, by examining the intellectual, political, religious, and social currents that contributed to their creation;
• to read texts about the period critically and analytically.
No previous experience with art or art history is necessary. 

Fall semester. Professor Courtright.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Nicola Courtright

T 03:00PM-03:50PM

Amherst College
EUST-135F-01-2122F

MEAD 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-01,ARCH-135F-01,EUST-135F-01

02
0.00

Nicola Courtright

W 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
EUST-135F-02-2122F

FAYE 115

nmcourtright@amherst.edu
ARHA-135F-02,ARCH-135F-02,EUST-135F-02

01
4.00

Naomi Darling

MW 08:45AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115015

Art 211

ndarling@mtholyoke.edu
This hybrid studio addresses human comfort with lectures and problem work sessions integrated with design projects. We start with an in-depth study of the world's climate regions, the sun, and the earth's tilt and spin. Primary methods of heat transfer are investigated as students research two architectural solutions (vernacular and contemporary) within each climate. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams students will design, draw and build a functioning solar clock. Issues in day-lighting and thermal comfort will then drive an extended design problem. Students will be asked to solve numerical problems and present design solutions using both drawings and models.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jessica Maier

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
114959

Art 220

jmaier@mtholyoke.edu
This course focuses on architecture in Italy--including churches, palaces, villas, and urban planning--from the 1400s to the 1600s. In this period, architects took their cues from the classical tradition even as they carved out their own territory, developing new techniques and perfecting old ones to realize their designs. We will trace shifting architectural practice through key figures from Brunelleschi to Bernini, and through the lens of larger cultural forces. We will also examine buildings in light of the painted and sculpted decorative programs that were often integral to their overall effect.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Dana Leibsohn

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARH-204-01-202201

Neilson 102

dleibsoh@smith.edu
How do people of the present interpret the visual, material and urban cultures created in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans? To explore this question, this class focuses upon visual cultures and urban settings from across the Americas. Emphasis rests upon recent research — especially about the Inka, the Aztec, and their ancestors  but we will also study current debates in art history and archaeology. Among the themes we will discuss: sacrifice and rulership, representations of human and deified beings, the symbolic and economic meanings of materials and the ethics of excavation and museum display. Case studies include architectural complexes, textiles, ceramics and sculpted works from Peru, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. Southwest. Group A, Counts for ARU
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

M W 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
LSS-105-01-202201

Seelye 312

rbertone@smith.edu
This introductory course explores the evolving and interdisciplinary field of landscape studies. Drawing upon a diverse array of disciplinary influences in the social sciences, humanities and design fields, landscape studies is concerned with the complex and multifaceted relationship between human beings and the physical environment. Students in this course learn to critically analyze a wide variety of landscape types from the scale of a small garden to an entire region, as well as to practice different methods of landscape investigation. It is a course designed to change the way one sees the world, providing a fresh look at everyday and extraordinary places alike. Priority given to first-year students, sophomores and LSS minors. Enrollment limited to 30.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Thomas Moga

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
LSS-230-01-202201

Bass 204

smoga@smith.edu
Students in this course investigate the production of the built environment and the landscape of cities, focusing on key actors such as neighborhood activists, real estate developers, city officials, and environmentalists, among other advocates and interested parties. Organized thematically and supplemented by readings in urban theory and related fields, the course tackles questions of how urban places are made, why different cities look and feel the way they do, and who shapes the city. Prerequisites: LSS 100 or LSS 105 or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Thomas Moga

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
LSS-240-01-202201

Burton 307

smoga@smith.edu
Debates over the meaning, interpretation and management of unique, artistic, historic and/or culturally significant places take center stage in this course. Students consider how and why some landscapes and buildings get preserved and protected while others are redesigned, ignored, neglected or demolished. Major themes in the course include continuity and change in the built environment, notions of cultural heritage and the concept of authenticity. Readings include theoretical and historical perspectives on the topic supplemented by case studies and field investigations. Prerequisites: LSS 100 or LSS 105 or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

TU TH 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
LSS-255-01-202201

Burton 406

rbertone@smith.edu
Environmental designers are in the unique and challenging position of bridging the science of ecology and the art of place-making. This landscape design studio emphasizes the dual necessity for solutions to ecological problems that are artfully designed and artistic expressions that reveal ecological processes. Beginning with readings, precedent studies and in-depth site analysis, students design a series of projects that explore the potential for melding art and ecology. Enrollment limited to 14.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Reid W. Bertone-Johnson

M W F 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
LSS-260-01-202201

Burton 406

rbertone@smith.edu
Communicating with images is different than communicating with words. By learning how the eye and brain work together to derive meaning from images, students take perceptual principles and translate them into design principles for effective visual communication. Course lectures, readings, and exercises cover graphic design, visual information, information graphics and portfolio design. Students are introduced to graphic design software, online mapping software and develop skills necessary to complete a portfolio of creative work or a visual book showcasing a body or research. Enrollment limited to 18. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Joseph Krupczynski

TH 10:00AM 12:30PM

UMass Amherst
10608

John Olver Design Bldg Rm 221

jkrup@umass.edu
10595
This seminar course provides several frameworks to explore critical architectural/spatial dialogues between a broad range of political, cultural and social contexts. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

Program Co-Chairs:

Thom Long, Associate Professor of Architecture and Design, Hampshire College

Gabriel Arboleda, Assistant Professor of Art and the History of Art and Architectural Studies, Amherst College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator

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