International Relations Program

Formed in 1981, the Five College IR Program is a unique collaboration of disciplines and institutions that forms one of the richest interdisciplinary undergraduate international relations learning and teaching environments in the nation.

The Five College IR Program brings together a highly talented group of political scientists, historians and economists from all Five Colleges—Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts–Amherst—to collaborate on research and to offer a diverse range of courses from multiple disciplines and intellectual perspectives.

One of the core features of the Five College IR Program is the Five College International Relations Certificate. With challenges such as globalization, regional and ethnic conflict, environmental degradation, resource scarcity, demographic stress, global climate change and wide disparities in global economic development and global public health among others, the world is increasingly more complex. Now more than ever, students need to be prepared to confront the complexities of these international challenges with interdisciplinary understandings. The Five College IR certificate program is designed for students who want to make connections between their field of study and the global challenges.

Each year, more than 50 students from the Five Colleges earn their certificate. Many have gone into international relations careers in government, non-governmental organizations, business, academia and journalism.

The Five College IR program also hosts the Five College International Relations Faculty Seminar. The seminar is a forum for scholars to collaborate and to share work in progress. Each year, the seminar is host to some of the nation’s leading international relations scholars and graduate students who present and discuss their current research.

The Five College IR program also sponsors and co-sponsors several public events in the Five College community featuring policymakers, journalists, scholars and advocates from around the world.

On This Page

Faculty

The Five Colleges International Relations Program is governed by a group of faculty from different disciplines. The governing committee consists of a small group which makes decisions about the Certificate Program.

A larger group of faculty participates in the Five College IR Faculty Seminar. This group listed below meets regularly with outside speakers to discuss current research, to exchange scholarly papers, and to collaborate on research and teaching. These faculty often collaborate on scholarly projects, and the program provides an effective forum for such activities. There is currently one such project: Post-Hegemonic Global Governance, a project run by the Five College Professor of International Relations Jon Western and UMass professors Peter Haas and Kevin Young. The project is analyzing the changing roles and policies of the United States in a world in which the meanings of security are evolving in unanticipated directions.

There is at least one advisor (marked with an asterisk) on each campus for the International Relations Certificate.

Javier Corrales*
Political Science, Amherst College
Latin America, the politics of economic and social policy reform in developing countries

Pavel Machala*
Political Science, Amherst College
Marxist international relations theory, world political systems, world capitalist economy, U.S. diplomacy, domestic sources of U.S. foreign policy

Eleonora Mattiacci*
International Politics, Amherst College
Emphasis on security studies. Various aspects of the technology on international security, ranging from the impact of modern weapons on warfare to the impact of nuclear proliferation in relations among countries.

Ruxandra Paul*
European Studies, Political Science, Amherst College
Political and societal impact of globalization, supranational integration and increasingly porous borders. International migration, cyberpolitics, varieties of citizenship, European politics, the European Union, post-communist politics and societies, democratization, civil society, and transnational rights.

Kerry Ratigan*
Political Science, Amherst College
China, social policy, authoritarianism, and state-society relations. Her research examines how local politics shapes social policy provision in China.

*Certificate Advisor

Frank Holmquist
Critical Social Inquiry, Hampshire College (Emeritus)
Comparative politics, peasant political economy, African and Third World development

April Merleaux*
Critical Social Inquiry, Hampshire College

US Foreign Policy and Empire Studies, environmental and agrarian studies, critical race and ethnicity, drug policy

*Certificate Advisor

Calvin Chen
Politics Department, Mount Holyoke College
Political economy of East Asia, Chinese politics, comparative politics, work and labor politics, rural economic development, public administration

Sohail Hashmi*
International Relations Program, Mount Holyoke
Religion and politics, particularly the role of Islam in domestic and international relations; ethics and international relations, particularly the comparative ethics of war and peace; Middle East politics

Stephen F. Jones
International Relations, Mount Holyoke College
Russia, the Caucuses, post-Communist transitions, and nationalism

Kavita Khory*
International Relations, Mount Holyoke College
South Asian politics and regional security, political violence, nationalism, migration, diaspora politics

Eva Paus
Economics, McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives, Mount Holyoke College
Economic development in the context of globalization, the implications of the rise of China for developing countries, policy space for alternatives to the Washington Consensus, globalization of production and possibilities for economic development

Andy Reiter
Politics, Mount Holyoke
Comparative politics, transitional justice, international law, political violence, Latin American politics

Jon Western
Politics, Mount Holyoke College
International security; human rights; American foreign policy

*Certificate Advisor

Mlada Bukovansky*
Government, Smith College
IR theory, evolving norms and institutions, European politics

Brent Durbin
Government, Smith College
American foreign policy, strategic intelligence, military conflict and culture

Gregory White*
Government, Smith College
Political economy of developing countries and their relationships with advanced industrialized countries, the political economy and security implications of international labor migration, the north-south dimension of natural resource exploitation, the prospects of electoral reform

*Certificate Advisor

Audrey L. Altstadt*
History Department, UMass
Soviet History; Soviet nationalities, especially Azerbaijan, Central Asia

Christian G. Appy
History Department, UMass
Modern U.S. History, Vietnam War

Charli Carpenter
Political Science, UMass
National security ethics, the laws of war, transnational advocacy networks, gender and political violence, war crimes, comparative genocide studies, humanitarian affairs, the role of information technology in human security

Eric Einhorn
Political Science, UMass (Emeritus)
Comparative public policy and political economy, European politics, and Scandinavian politics

Joshua S. Goldstein
Political Science, UMass
IR theory, theories of war, gender and war

Peter M. Haas
Political Science, UMass
International relations theory, international political economy, international environmental politics, international institutions, global governance

David Mednicoff
Legal Studies, Public Policy, UMass
Middle East, Arab-Israeli conflict, U.S. foreign policy, international law, human rights, globalization, humanitarian intervention

M.J. Peterson*
Political Science, UMass
World Politics, international institutions, international political economy, technology and technological change

Jillian Schwedler
Political Science, UMass
Globalization, Neoliberalism, transnational religious networks, public spheres,
Middle East politics

Regine Spector
Political Science, UMass
Comparative politics, political economy, development, Eurasian politics

Kevin Young
Political Science, UMass
International political economy, financial regulation, private sector lobbying

*Certificate Advisor

Certificate

The Five College International Relations Certificate Program offers an opportunity for students to pursue an interest in international relations as a complement to their majors.

Course requirements for the certificate cover the following areas of study:

  1. A course on introductory world politics
  2. A course on global institutions or problems
  3. A course on the international financial and/or commercial system
  4. A course concerning the historical development of the international system since 1789
  5. A course on contemporary American foreign policy
  6. Proficiency in a contemporary foreign language through the completion of two years of the language at the college level or its equivalent. (For Amherst College students, the requirement is two years of college-level foreign language study.)
  7. Two courses on the politics, economy and/or society of foreign areas, of which one must involve the study of a Third World country or region

Here are a few basic things to consider:

  1. There are seven requirements.
  2. No more than four courses in any one discipline can be counted toward the certificate.
  3. No single course can satisfy more than one requirement.
  4. Candidates must complete the required courses (with the exception of the foreign language courses) with grades of at least B or better (no Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory grades). Non-Hampshire students should request grades for Hampshire courses. The Hampshire advisor will certify that Hampshire students have satisfied the requirement.
  5. Not all of the courses listed are presented every year. Consult your college catalogue and relevant departments in this regard.

If you have questions whether or not a course counts for one of the seven requirements, please contact your campus advisor.

Once you have satisfied the seven requirements, you should fill out a Certificate Completion Form. Then, take the form to your IR certificate advisor, who will complete processing of the form (per instructions on the form).

Typically, none of the certificates are mailed to students' addresses until some time in August. The notation on your transcript, however, appears much more quickly.

Frequently Asked Questions

Meet with your advisor for the certificate program to review your Certificate Completion Form and an unofficial copy of your transcript. Make sure any courses for which grades are pending are clearly marked on the Certificate Completion Form. Graduating seniors should ensure that their advisor receives the certificate completion documents by the dates noted on the Certificate Completion Form (November 1 for Fall semester graduates and April 1 for Spring semester graduates).

If your advisor agrees you have completed the requirements, the advisor signs the Certificate Completion Form and follows the instructions on the Certificate Completion Form. Five College Academic Programs must receive certificate completion documentation by the dates noted on the Certificate Completion Form. Five College staff coordinate with the registrars to verify any pending grades as well as to implement the final steps of adding the certificate award notation to the student's transcript.

A hard copy of the certificate is normally mailed to the student from Five Colleges, Inc. in July following the student’s date of graduation.

To satisfy the language requirement for the Certificate you must take courses that bring you to an intermediate level in that language. The main purpose is to allow you to do primary research in a particular language. Some flexibility exists depending upon the language you choose to study. More difficult languages (Japanese, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, etc.) are more flexible regarding what courses you need to complete. Check with your campus adviser to clarify what courses you need to take in order to satisfy the requirement. If you are not a native English language speaker and fluent in that other language, you have satisfied the requirement.

Yes, you can. You should check with your adviser prior to taking the courses to be sure that they can satisfy a certain requirement. Credit is granted once the course work has been completed.

You may count AP credits as long as you received college credit for the work, i.e., the registrar counts them toward your graduation credit requirement. You may NOT use AP credits if they were only granted to allow you access to an upper level course.

There are Five College Certificate advisors on each of the five campuses. Feel free to contact an advisor on your campus if you have further questions.

Courses

Spring 2022 International Relations Courses

01
4.00

Bryan Nakayama

MW 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
116812
bnakayam@mtholyoke.edu
This course is a survey of contending approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world politics. Examines key concepts--including balance of power, imperialism, collective security, deterrence, and interdependence--with historical examples ranging from the Peloponnesian War to the post-cold war world. Analyzes the emerging world order.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Bryan Nakayama

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116813
bnakayam@mtholyoke.edu
This course is a survey of contending approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world politics. Examines key concepts--including balance of power, imperialism, collective security, deterrence, and interdependence--with historical examples ranging from the Peloponnesian War to the post-cold war world. Analyzes the emerging world order.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Christopher Mitchell

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116817
mitchell@mtholyoke.edu
This course examines the theory and practice of the politics of international trade and economics, focusing on the spread of global trade, global financial flows, causes and effects of globalization and migration, and the intersection of trade and environmental issues. Major themes include tensions between the developed and developing world, various development strategies, and the impact of a rising China on both the developed North American and European economies and developing economies.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bryan Nakayama

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116858
bnakayam@mtholyoke.edu
For many, the "cyber-revolution" has fundamentally altered all aspects of human existence through the creation of a new space of interaction: cyberspace. This course asks whether and to what extent cyberspace has revolutionized the nature of international politics. Are traditional understandings of sovereignty, deterrence, and diplomacy bunk? Rather than engaging in speculation, this course will cover the history of the development of both cyberspace and the beliefs that it will revolutionize politics. By examining the distance between speculation and reality this course will provide a grounded understanding of the effects of the "cyber-revolution" on international politics.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mlada Bukovansky

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
GOV-221-01-202203
mbukovan@smith.edu
This course focuses on the development of European democratic institutions in the context of military and economic conflict and cooperation. Includes an introduction to the process of European integration.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Brent M. Durbin

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GOV-241-01-202203
bdurbin@smith.edu
An introduction to the theoretical and empirical analysis of the interactions of states in the international system. Emphasis is given to the historical evolution of the international system, security politics, the role of international norms in shaping behavior, and the influence of the world economy on international relations. Not a course in current events. Enrollment limited to 50.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mlada Bukovansky

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GOV-252-01-202203
mbukovan@smith.edu
What role do international organizations play in world politics, and what role should they play? Do international organizations represent humanity’s higher aspirations or are they simply tools of the wealthy and powerful? This course explores the problems and processes of international organizations by drawing on theoretical, historical and contemporary sources and perspectives. We focus on three contemporary organizations: the United Nations, the World Trade Organization and the European Union. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 50.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Greg White

M W 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GOV-255-01-202203
gwhite@smith.edu
The tourism industry is arguably the world’s largest employer; it is undoubtedly the leading sector in trade in services. Although modern tourism has political, economic and social implications, it has been largely underexamined by political science and the subfield of international relations. This upper-level colloquium examines the sector and its many complicated dimensions and effects: environment, security, development, consumerism, and cultural exchange and understanding. It approaches these issues historically and with careful attention to a variety of cases and sub-sectors--e.g., eco-tourism, adventure tourism, health tourism, etc. Prerequisite: One course in international relations or comparative politics. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nicholas Caverly

M W 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
25844

School of Management 137

ncaverly@umass.edu
The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

TH 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
25845

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

TH 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
25846

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

TH 5:30PM 6:20PM

UMass Amherst
25847

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
25848

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
25849

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
25850

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
25851

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
25852

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AK

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
25853

Dickinson Hall room 214

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Meredith Degyansky

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
25925

James House Room 102

mdegyansky@umass.edu
The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Scot Brackenridge

M W F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
27221

Herter Hall room 400

sbrackenridg@umass.edu
This course examines the role of various religious traditions in the development of Chinese culture, including Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and popular religious traditions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Zhongwei Shen

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
27205
zwshen@asianlan.umass.edu
Focus on social and cultural diversity in China through the lens of language. This course will emphasize three aspects: classification of the minorities and their languages, language contact and the formation of Chinese dialects, and the role of language in identifying ethnic groups and in maintaining distinct cultures. No prerequisites.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Yu Liu

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
27223
liuyu@asianlan.umass.edu
Selected authentic modern Chinese works of various genres, including essays, short stories, editorials, prose, etc. This advanced-level Chinese language course focuses on continued development of critical reading and comprehension skills.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Emily West

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
27301

Thompson Hall room 104

ewest@comm.umass.edu
Media play a central role in politics, economics, culture, and our everyday lives. Our key concern is to understand both the direct and subtle operations of media power in society today: How do media construct meaning? How new technologies transform our most intimate and personal relationships? How do data-driven corporations track and monetize their users often without their consent or political accountability? This class introduces students to different media studies traditions of medium theory, political economy, representations, and audience studies that examine media as (respectively) technologies, institutions, narratives, and audiences / users. The class takes an insistently global approach in analyzing the diversity and plurality of media cultures around the world. We also take a normative perspective in evaluating good and bad media practice in the ways that technologies and narratives can on the one hand deepen social inequalities and on the other hand challenge systems of oppression and amplify the voices of vulnerable communities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Michelle Ciccone

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
27437

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 130

mmciccone@umass.edu
This course explores the influence of the mass media on the social world, particularly the media's impact on audiences. We will investigate various approaches utilized to determine if, when, and how media influence viewers, listeners, and readers. We will examine this issue from both scientific and cultural studies perspectives. Some of the questions we will consider include: How does television violence impact society and individuals? Can watching sex on television and film lead to teenage promiscuity? Are political advertisements and news coverage creating a more or less informed voter? How do people make sense of the media in their lives? The focus of this course is to understand how these questions are studied and what, if any, conclusions can be drawn from such research.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
3.00

Lizhen Zhao

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
27476

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 230

lzhao@umass.edu
This course explores the influence of the mass media on the social world, particularly the media's impact on audiences. We will investigate various approaches utilized to determine if, when, and how media influence viewers, listeners, and readers. We will examine this issue from both scientific and cultural studies perspectives. Some of the questions we will consider include: How does television violence impact society and individuals? Can watching sex on television and film lead to teenage promiscuity? Are political advertisements and news coverage creating a more or less informed voter? How do people make sense of the media in their lives? The focus of this course is to understand how these questions are studied and what, if any, conclusions can be drawn from such research.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
3.00

Zichao Li

M W F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
27594

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 130

zichaoli@umass.edu
This course explores the influence of the mass media on the social world, particularly the media's impact on audiences. We will investigate various approaches utilized to determine if, when, and how media influence viewers, listeners, and readers. We will examine this issue from both scientific and cultural studies perspectives. Some of the questions we will consider include: How does television violence impact society and individuals? Can watching sex on television and film lead to teenage promiscuity? Are political advertisements and news coverage creating a more or less informed voter? How do people make sense of the media in their lives? The focus of this course is to understand how these questions are studied and what, if any, conclusions can be drawn from such research.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Antonios Gounalakis

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
28531

Machmer Hall room W-24

agounalakis@umass.edu
Evaluation and comparison of the structure and performance of alternative economic systems. Topics include: mechanisms of resource allocation and pricing, institutions of government policy, organization of work and labor relations, international trade and finance, and income distribution. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or RESECON 102.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Curtice Griffin

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
29411

Integ. Learning Center S331

cgriffin@eco.umass.edu
Conservation science is concerned with phenomena that affect the maintenance, loss, and restoration of Earth?s animals, plants and ecosystem while balancing the needs of people. Using principles from ecology, population genetics, economics, political science, and other natural and social sciences, this course will examine the global changes causing widespread species extinctions via large-scale shifts in climate, habitat destruction and fragmentation, ocean acidification, overexploitation, and invasive species. We will also focus on the various conservation strategies used to conserve ecosystems and biodiversity.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Patrick Mensah

TU 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
29963

Integ. Learning Center S231

pmensah@frital.umass.edu
29489
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
29964

Herter Hall room 209

29498
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
29965

Herter Hall room 209

29499
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Eric Thomas

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
29991

School of Management 137

ehthomas@umass.edu
A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

M 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30037

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

M 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30038

Morrill 1 Room N345

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

TU 1:00PM 1:50PM

UMass Amherst
30039

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

TU 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30040

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

W 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30041

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

TH 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30042

Morrill 1 Room N345

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

W 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30043

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

TH 1:00PM 1:50PM

UMass Amherst
30044

Hasbrouck Room 236

A wide-ranging introduction to the ways people shape the world they live in. We will study the themes and concepts of human geography through the current issues and large questions which guide them. Lectures and reading will focus on the geographic aspects of cultural diversity, population issues, states vs. nations, the global economy, development, urbanization and the human transformation of the earth. We will cover major subdivisions of human geography including cultural geography, population geography, economic geography, social geography, urban geography and political geography. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ela Gezen

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
36598

Herter Hall room 102

egezen@german.umass.edu
This course examines representations of Berlin in contemporary literature, film, music and art projects in a historical and socio-cultural context with a focus on minorities, migrants, and exiles. Conducted in English. (Gen. Ed. AL, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Brian Ogilvie

M W 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30358

Thompson Hall room 102

ogilvie@history.umass.edu
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 8:00AM 8:50AM

UMass Amherst
30401
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30402
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
30403
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30404
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30405
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30406
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
30420
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30421
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AK

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30422
"The development of the modern world, with particular attention to colonialism, imperialism, and the revolutionary movements for national liberation." (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mark Roblee

M W 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30385

Integ. Learning Center S331

mroblee@umass.edu
What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

W 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30453

Bartlett Hall room 61

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

W 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30454

Bartlett Hall room 61

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

W 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30455

Bartlett Hall room 61

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

W 8:00AM 8:50AM

UMass Amherst
36622

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 136

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

W 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
36623

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 136

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

W 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
36624

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 136

What is religion, and why do people care so much about it? This course will examine the origins and development of some of the world's major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will read sacred texts and travel to sites of worship. We will also consider how religion continues to shape current affairs. Students will prepare analytic essays, participate in group discussions, and attend off-campus field trips. The course will demonstrate that understanding religion is critical to participating in a global community and will neither advocate or denigrate religious participation. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susan Ware

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
30391

Elm Room 210

susanw@honors.umass.edu
Focus on major world religions and their history, teachings, and role today in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity; the interrelations of religion and culture in the modern world. (Gen.Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alice Nash

TU TH 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30371

Thompson Hall room 106

anash@history.umass.edu
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
30462
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30463
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30464
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 8:00AM 8:50AM

UMass Amherst
36631
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
36632
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
36633
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36634
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
36635
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AK

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
36636
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Emily Hamilton

M W 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30325

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 134

ehamilton@history.umass.edu
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 8:00AM 8:50AM

UMass Amherst
30326
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30327
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30328
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30388
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30389
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 4:00PM 4:50PM

UMass Amherst
30390
Science in the modern world from the Enlightenment to the Cold War. Key scientific issues of the modern age, the social organization of science, the place of the scientific community in larger social and cultural context, and the expanding relationship between science and modern technology. (Gen.Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Laura McNeil

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
30332

Integ. Learning Center S211

lamcneil@history.umass.edu
This course will examine the economic, political and social developments in Ireland, from the Act of Union to "the Troubles" in Northern Ireland. In particular we will focus on the divisive issues of land ownership, religious sectarianism and the articulation of a national identity as we chart Ireland's progress towards independence. We will also discuss Irish emigration to America, and the influence of Irish-American nationalism on Irish political movements. (Gen. Ed. HS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Sigrid Schmalzer

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
30491
sigrid@history.umass.edu
The personalities, events, and forces that shaped China during the last century: collapse of the imperial order; warlordism, foreign invasion; political and cultural revolutions; Mao and the Chinese Communist Party; the struggle to "modernize" China's economy, society, and culture; role of China in today's world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Young

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30380

Herter Hall room 225

kayoung@umass.edu
This course traces the history of Mexican society, politics, and culture from the late 18th century to the present. The first half analyzes the turbulent formation of Mexico, the legacies of Spanish colonialism, peasant uprisings of the 19th century, and the origins and course of the famous Revolution of 1910. The second half focuses on the century since the revolution, including the consolidation of a conservative one-party state, the so-called "Mexican miracle" of the mid-20th century, the adoption of neoliberal economic policies starting in the 1980s, and the ongoing political struggles of workers, peasants, women, students, and indigenous people. Equipped with this historical grounding, we will then try to make sense of the crises of neoliberalism, drug-related violence, and declining state legitimacy in the early part of this century. Previous Latin American history survey desirable.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jonathan Skolnik

TU TH 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30407

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

jskolnik@german.umass.edu
30257,31046
This course explores the causes and consequences of what was arguably the most horrific event in all of history. Topics include both the long-term origins of the Holocaust in European racism and anti-Semitism and the more immediate origins in the dynamics of the Nazi state and the war against the Soviet Union. Particular attention will be given to the debates and controversies, including the motivations of German and non-German perpetrators, bystanders, and collaborations, the place of the Jew and non-Jews in Holocaust historiography, the continuities of racism and genocide and their comparability, and the consequences of the Holocaust for memory and world politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30408
31049
This course explores the causes and consequences of what was arguably the most horrific event in all of history. Topics include both the long-term origins of the Holocaust in European racism and anti-Semitism and the more immediate origins in the dynamics of the Nazi state and the war against the Soviet Union. Particular attention will be given to the debates and controversies, including the motivations of German and non-German perpetrators, bystanders, and collaborations, the place of the Jew and non-Jews in Holocaust historiography, the continuities of racism and genocide and their comparability, and the consequences of the Holocaust for memory and world politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
30409
31050
This course explores the causes and consequences of what was arguably the most horrific event in all of history. Topics include both the long-term origins of the Holocaust in European racism and anti-Semitism and the more immediate origins in the dynamics of the Nazi state and the war against the Soviet Union. Particular attention will be given to the debates and controversies, including the motivations of German and non-German perpetrators, bystanders, and collaborations, the place of the Jew and non-Jews in Holocaust historiography, the continuities of racism and genocide and their comparability, and the consequences of the Holocaust for memory and world politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30410
31051
This course explores the causes and consequences of what was arguably the most horrific event in all of history. Topics include both the long-term origins of the Holocaust in European racism and anti-Semitism and the more immediate origins in the dynamics of the Nazi state and the war against the Soviet Union. Particular attention will be given to the debates and controversies, including the motivations of German and non-German perpetrators, bystanders, and collaborations, the place of the Jew and non-Jews in Holocaust historiography, the continuities of racism and genocide and their comparability, and the consequences of the Holocaust for memory and world politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Stephen Forrest

M W 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30885

Integ. Learning Center S231

sforrest@asianlan.umass.edu
Introduction to Japanese literature from around 1600 to present. Alternating between reading poetry and prose and viewing classics of Japanese film. Discussion of the construction of love and death during centuries of national seclusion and in the era of Western influence. Focus on changing gender relations and on the status of discriminated against minorities. Conducted in English. No prerequisites. (Gen.Ed. AL)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30887
Introduction to Japanese literature from around 1600 to present. Alternating between reading poetry and prose and viewing classics of Japanese film. Discussion of the construction of love and death during centuries of national seclusion and in the era of Western influence. Focus on changing gender relations and on the status of discriminated against minorities. Conducted in English. No prerequisites. (Gen.Ed. AL)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
30888
Introduction to Japanese literature from around 1600 to present. Alternating between reading poetry and prose and viewing classics of Japanese film. Discussion of the construction of love and death during centuries of national seclusion and in the era of Western influence. Focus on changing gender relations and on the status of discriminated against minorities. Conducted in English. No prerequisites. (Gen.Ed. AL)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Amanda Seaman

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
36695

Herter Hall room 211

acseaman@asianlan.umass.edu
36696
In this course we will explore the transformation of Tokyo from Edo into one of the most vibrant, cosmopolitan cities of the world. Using the themes of maps, disaster and rebirth, and the role of space in identity formation, we will look at how the city has been transformed and reborn. Our materials will include film, photos, literature, and history in order to delve into the nooks and crannies of the city and the city spaces. Course instruction and materials will be in English.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rodrigo Zamith

M W 5:30PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
30917

Integ. Learning Center N255

rzamith@umass.edu
This course employs a social scientific lens to examining the challenges and issues facing journalists covering global affairs. The class is structured around three overarching areas: (1) canonical theories for understanding impacts on and of journalism; (2) journalistic cultures and transnational issues; and (3) journalistic routines and practices. Each of these areas is applied to the context of international journalism, highlighting what is distinct (and not so different) about bringing the world home. Students will also learn about how to empirically evaluate different aspects of international journalism through the use of social scientific tools. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ralph Melnick

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
31024

Herter Hall room 205

rmelnick@judnea.umass.edu
The life and history of the Jews in the medieval and modern worlds. Topics include Jewish-Christian relations; development of Jewish philosophy and mysticism; Jewish life in Eastern Europe; the Holocaust; State of Israel; Jews and Judaism in North America. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ralph Melnick

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
31055

Herter Hall room 107

rmelnick@judnea.umass.edu
Survey of antisemitism through its various stages of historical development, from ancient times to the present. Primary focus on the intellectual, religious, political, and social roots of Jew-hatred. Special attention to its impact on Jewish life and thought, and to the range of Jewish re-sponses to anti-semitism. Topics include: the Jews in Graeco-Roman society; medieval Christendom and Islam; the emergence of modern political and racial anti-semitism. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

A Wing

TH 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
31604

Machmer Hall room W-21

lwing@legal.umass.edu
The course examines implementation of the peace process and co-constructing a shared future of equals when the past and future remain heavily contested. Efforts to address the conflict's legacy are explored in the legal, political, and social arenas including truth recovery, reconciliation, urban regeneration, policing, language revival, and public art.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malissa Taylor

M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
32415

Herter Hall room 106

taylor@umass.edu
If Middle Eastern societies did not secularize during the years 1400-1800, does that mean that the relationship between politics and religion didn't change at all? In fact, important changes did occur and this course will investigate their impact on the region's history by surveying institutions, social movements, political writings and imperial policies of the Ottoman Empire and Iran. (Gen Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Timothy Pachirat

M W 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
33929

Thompson Hall room 104

pachirat@umass.edu
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
33930
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
33931
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
33932
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
33933
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
33934
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
33935
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
33966
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
33967
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AK

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
33968
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BA

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
34122
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BB

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
34123
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BC

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
34124
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Elif Savas

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
38323

Mary Lyon House rm 119 (loung)

esavas@umass.edu
An introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Robert Musgrave

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
33936

Thompson Hall room 104

musgrave@umass.edu
Introduction to the principles and practices of international relations in the political, military, economic, and environmental realms. Study of the development of the contemporary system to explore the effects of the structure of the international system, the institutions through which states conduct their relations, and domestic characteristics on the relations among states. (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Robert Musgrave

M W 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
34056

Morrill Sci Ctr (1) Room N375

musgrave@umass.edu
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
36544
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36545
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
36546
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AD

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
36547
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
36548
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AF

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
36549
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AG

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
36550
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AJ

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36551
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AK

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
36552
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BA

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
36553
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BB

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
36554
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01BC

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
36555
Principles of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the historical, political, and administrative sources of contemporary policies. Analysis of the foreign policy-making process with specific reference to illustrative case studies. (Gen.Ed. SB) Recommended: POLISCI 101 or 121 or equivalent course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Sonia Alvarez

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
34029

Machmer Hall room W-27

soniaa@polsci.umass.edu
Overview of major approaches to the study of Latin American politics and survey of historical and contemporary democratic, populist, authoritarian, and revolutionary regimes. Special attention to local, national and global forces shaping development strategies and public policies; changing institutional arrangements and shifting discourses of domination; and, social movements and strategies of resistance among subaltern social groups and classes.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Carlene Edie

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
33995

Machmer Hall room W-11

cjedie@polsci.umass.edu
Focuses on four countries often denied a Caribbean identity Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti whose politics are assessed in regional Caribbean terms, identifying common factors in historical and contemporary development. POLISCI 245 recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Carlene Edie

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
33983

Machmer Hall room W-11

cjedie@polsci.umass.edu
Comparison of political economy of four former British colonies of West Africa: Nigeria, Ghana, the Gambia and Sierra Leone. Difficulties of nation-state formation, the politics of the military state, role of governments in promoting, altering or retarding economic growth; impact of IMF and other external institutions on development processes. The Gambia as deviate case: liberalism and electoral politics examined. Recommended: POLISCI 111.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

M.J. Peterson

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36565

Machmer Hall room W-15

mjp@polsci.umass.edu
37016
Development of basic rules of public international law. Topics include sources of evidence for law, international legal personality, jurisdiction, treatment of individuals, law of treaties, law of the sea, resort to force, and peaceful settlement of disputes. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors. POLISCI 121 or equivalent strongly recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jane Fountain

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
33997

Goodell Room 608 - TBL

jfountai@umass.edu
38316
The course examines power and uses of digital technologies in national, transnational and global governance. Topics include inequalities, transparency, civil society, state capacity, privacy, social movements, cyberwar and electoral politics. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
36572
The course examines power and uses of digital technologies in national, transnational and global governance. Topics include inequalities, transparency, civil society, state capacity, privacy, social movements, cyberwar and electoral politics. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36573
The course examines power and uses of digital technologies in national, transnational and global governance. Topics include inequalities, transparency, civil society, state capacity, privacy, social movements, cyberwar and electoral politics. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
36574
The course examines power and uses of digital technologies in national, transnational and global governance. Topics include inequalities, transparency, civil society, state capacity, privacy, social movements, cyberwar and electoral politics. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Debi Prasad Mohapatra

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
34926

Integ. Learning Center S331

dmohapatra@umass.edu
Explores the causes of hunger (chronic undernutrition) from an economic perspective. Focus on how population growth and economic development are increasing demand for food and on the prospects for food production to supply those needs at affordable prices, while sustaining the environment. Discussion in the context of the global economy in which increased trade links even the poorest urban and rural residents in developing countries to market forces. (Gen.Ed. SB, G)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

John Stranlund

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
34856

Thompson Hall room 106

stranlund@resecon.umass.edu
Economic analysis of environmental problems focusing on air, water, and land pollution. Emphasis is on analyzing the individual incentives that lead to environmental degradation, the valuation of environmental quality, and the design and evaluation of regulations that seek to improve environmental quality. Includes the economic analysis of global climate change. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kathleen Hulton

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
35324

Goessmann Laboratory room 20

khulton@umass.edu
Introduction to Sociology. Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life. (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Youngmin Yi

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
35331

Machmer Hall room E-35

youngminyi@umass.edu
Introduction to demography. Population size, distribution, and composition; their change through fertility, mortality, and migration. The social and economic determinants and consequences of population trends. (Gen. Ed. R2)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Aaron Yates,Anthony Huaqui

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
35384

Machmer Hall room E-37

yates@soc.umass.eduahuaqui@soc.umass.edu
This course introduces students to sociological theory, concepts, methods, and results of critical inquiry into the issue of globalization -- the complex and multi-level interconnections of historical, political, economic, and cultural dynamics taking place internationally and how globalization is tied into numerous social issues and inequalities in the U.S. and around the world. (Gen. Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Agustin Lao-Montes

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
35376

Machmer Hall room E-35

lao@soc.umass.edu
Basic issues in political sociology and politics: interaction between the political and social-cultural spheres, sources and manifestations of political inequality; variety of social conflict and its major theories; relationship between political ideas and political behavior. Issues of political violence and coercion, political propaganda and legitimation, intellectuals and political power.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Emma Rivera-Rabago

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
35497

Herter Hall room 117

rivera@spanport.umass.edu
Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the end of the Romantic period to the present. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: SPANISH 311 or consent of instructor. (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

Five College Staff Liaison:

Ray Rennard, Director of Academic Programs