Middle Eastern Studies

The Five College Certificate Program in Middle Eastern Studies is an opportunity for students to complement a disciplinary major with multidisciplinary studies and linguistic attainments. Because of the wide range of courses available through the Five College consortium, students may design a program that will meet their intellectual, academic and prospective professional needs in conjunction with an advisor from their home institution.

Middle Eastern Studies is coordinated on a Five College basis by an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Collaborative activity includes sponsorship of cultural programming, publication and coordination of courses and administration of a Five College Certificate Program in Middle Eastern Studies.

Faculty

Chris Dole, Anthropology & Sociology and Asian Languages & Civilizations
Mohamed Hassan, Arabic
Tariq Jaffer, Religion
Mona Oraby, Law, Jurisprudence, & Social Thought
Monica Ringer, History and Asian Languages & Civilizations 

Aaron Berman, History (Emeritus)
Omar Dahi, Economics  
Salman Hameed, Integrated Science & Humanities 

Elif Babül, Anthropology
Sohail Hashmi, International Relations and Asian Studies 
Amina Steinfels, Religion 

Joshua Birk, History and Medieval Studies
Ibtissam Bouachrine, Spanish
Justin Cammy, Jewish Studies and World Literatures
Susanna Ferguson, Middle East Studies
May George, Arabic
Steven Heydemann, Middle East Studies
Suleiman Ali Mourad, Religion
Karen Pfeifer, Economics (Emerita)
John Weinert, Arabic
Bozena Welborne, Government
Gregory White, Government

Anne Broadbridge, History
Walter Denny, History of Art & Architecture
Tayeb El-Hibri, Judaic and Near Eastern Studies
Olga Gershenson, Judaic and Near Eastern Studies
Rachel Green, Comparative Literature and Israel/Palestine Studies
Hadi Jorati, History
Nahla Khalil, Arabic
Andrew March, Political Science
David Mednicoff, Public Policy and Middle Eastern Studies
Kathryn Schwartz, History
Mary Christina Wilson, History (Emerita)

Certificate

The Five College Certificate Program in Middle Eastern Studies is an opportunity for students to complement a disciplinary major with multidisciplinary studies and linguistic attainments. Because of the wide range of courses available through the Five College consortium, students may design a program that will meet their intellectual, academic and prospective professional needs in conjunction with an advisor from their home institution.

The program is administered by the Five College Middle Eastern Studies Committee, which includes faculty advisors from each participating campus. In addition to exploring the range of courses offered at the Five Colleges, students are encouraged to spend time in the Middle East, learning Arabic and other languages and immersing themselves in the culture of the area. Plans for study abroad should be designed in consultation with the student's advisor. Courses from outside the Five Colleges can be counted toward the certificate requirements on the recommendation of the campus advisor and the approval of the committee. Students must receive a grade of B or better in every course counted toward the Certificate.

Students interested in pursuing the certificate are encouraged to consult with a certificate program advisor regularly.

Certificate Advisors:

Amherst College: Monica Ringer 
Hampshire College: Omar Dahi
Mount Holyoke College: Sohail Hashmi
Smith College: Steven Heydemann
UMass Amherst: David Mednicoff

Certificate Requirements:

  1. Knowledge equivalent to at least two years of college-level study of a Middle Eastern language, such as Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Persian and Armenian. Classes in Arabic and Modern Hebrew are currently taught in the Five Colleges. Additional courses in Arabic as well as courses in Turkish, Persian and other languages are offered through the Five College Center for World Languages. This requirement may be fulfilled through course completion or by examination.
  2. Two introductory courses providing an overview of Middle Eastern history. One course must be in the premodern period (600–1500 CE) and one course must be in the modern period (1500–present).
  3. Five courses from the following categories. Students must take at least one course from each of the groups.
    1. Religion and Philosophy
    2. Literature, Art, and Language Study beyond what is required to satisfy the language requirement above
    3. History and Social Sciences

Certificate Completion:

In preparation for graduation, students pursuing the certificate should meet with their campus advisor to review courses taken to complete the requirements, using the certificate completion form.

The certificate completion form must be approved by the student's home campus advisor as well as the Five College Middle Eastern Studies Committee. Five College Certificates are awarded upon graduation. 

Courses

Fall 2021 Courses

01
4.00

Christopher Dole

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM

Amherst College
ANTH-265-01-2122F

CHAP 203

cdole@amherst.edu
ANTH-265-01,ASLC-266-01

(Offered as ANTH 265 and ASLC 266) This course draws on ethnographic writings, documentary film, and literary accounts to examine the everyday realities of people living in the region commonly referred to as the Middle East. Rather than attempting a survey of the entire region, the course explores a number of important themes in the anthropology of the Middle East. These themes include, among others: gender and sexuality, religious piety, urban space, migration, and political protest. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of some of the most pressing issues being faced in the region, and the ways that anthropologists have explored these issues. No previous knowledge of the Middle East or anthropology is assumed.   

Limited to 25 students. Fall semester. Professor Dole.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARCH-152-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ARHA-152-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Monica Ringer

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
ASLC-126-01-2122F

CHAP 203

mmringer@amherst.edu
HIST-190-01,ASLC-126-01

(Offered as HIST 190 [ME/TC/TEP] and ASLC 126) This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the outset of the Islamic period to the beginning of the modern period. It is divided into the following segments: the formative period of Islam, the classical caliphates, the classical courts, the Mongols, and the great empires of the Ottomans and the Safavids. The course is organized chronologically and follows the making and breaking of empires and political centers; however, the focus of the course is on the intellectual, social, cultural and religious developments in these periods. Two class meetings per week.

The course is designed to have substantial preparation (online readings and occassionally powerpoint lectures) done in preparation for class sessions which will be devoted entirely to discussion. All readings are available online. There are frequent response papers due, but no formal papers. This course is an introduction to Middle Eastern history and anticipates no prior knowledge. 

Fall Semester. Professor Ringer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Yael Rice

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ASLC-142-01-2122F

FAYE 113

yrice@amherst.edu
ARHA-152-01,ARCH-152-01,ASLC-142-01

(Offered as ARHA 152, ARCH 152 and ASLC 142) This course, a gateway class for the study of art history and architectural studies, introduces the art, architecture, and urban planning of the Islamic world, from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to the contemporary moment. Among the questions we will pose are: When, how, and why was the Qur’an first copied as a written text? Why does the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, completed in 691–2 A.D., closely resemble Christian churches and shrines from the same period? Why did medieval Europeans judge objects from the Islamic world, especially those bearing Arabic script, to be sacred in nature? How did commercial and diplomatic exchanges with China and Viking Scandinavia impact the arts of Central Asia and the Middle East during the premodern period? What can contemporary comic books tell us about the visual logic of fifteenth-century Iranian manuscript painting? And how have nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists used photography and film to address the legacies of colonialism and Orientalism? We will attempt to answer these questions through close and careful analysis of objects in a range of media, from silver and rock crystal to silk textiles and video; cities and architectural sites in Spain and India, and the many places in between; and primary and secondary texts. Films, museum websites, musical recordings, and visits to the Mead Art Museum and Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections will supplement readings, lectures, and discussions. No previous background is presumed, and all readings will be available in English.
No cap on enrollment.

Fall semester. Professor Rice.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Christopher Dole

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM

Amherst College
ASLC-266-01-2122F

CHAP 203

cdole@amherst.edu
ANTH-265-01,ASLC-266-01

(Offered as ANTH 265 and ASLC 266) This course draws on ethnographic writings, documentary film, and literary accounts to examine the everyday realities of people living in the region commonly referred to as the Middle East. Rather than attempting a survey of the entire region, the course explores a number of important themes in the anthropology of the Middle East. These themes include, among others: gender and sexuality, religious piety, urban space, migration, and political protest. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of some of the most pressing issues being faced in the region, and the ways that anthropologists have explored these issues. No previous knowledge of the Middle East or anthropology is assumed.   

Limited to 25 students. Fall semester. Professor Dole.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tariq Jaffer

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM

Amherst College
ASLC-283-01-2122F

CHAP 210

tjaffer@amherst.edu
RELI-283-01,ASLC-283-01

(Offered as RELI 283 and ASLC 283) What is correct Islamic belief and practice? Is there such a thing? Who has been labeled a heretic, unbeliever, or apostate in the history of Islam, and why? How did Muslim “freethinkers” contest Islamic orthodoxies? We will discuss the ways that a wide variety of Muslim sects or denominations developed in the history of Islam. Our objectives are to examine how groups and individuals established, prescribed, or remade standards of Islamic belief and practice; and to examine how they faced the plurality of Muslim sects and other religions. We will pay special attention to the theme of salvation, which shaped the ways that Muslims classified sects and other religions. As we explore the above issues we will read from a range of Islamic discourses, including scripture, theology, law, and mysticism. All readings are in English. Open to all students.

Fall semester. Associate Professor Jaffer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tariq Jaffer

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
ASLC-385-01-2122F

CHAP 210

tjaffer@amherst.edu
RELI-385-01,ASLC-385-01,ENGL-301-01

(Offered as RELI 385, ASLC 385 and ENGL 301) 

An exploration of several salient questions concerning the Qur’ān, the Islamic Revealed Book. How have Muslims explained the Qur’ān’s own proclamation of its supernatural origin and its miraculous quality?  How does the Qur’ān engage with and respond to the Hebrew Bible and Christian scriptures? Who has the authority to interpret the Qur’ān and why? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions that will occupy us over the course of the semester. We will also discuss the ways that the Qur’ān has been read as a work of law, theology, and mysticism, and how it has shaped theories of the state. Finally, we will isolate the Qur’ān from the Islamic tradition and explore the many ways that it can be read as a work of literature. 

All readings are in English. No prerequisites. 

Fall semester. Associate Professor Jaffer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tariq Jaffer

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
ENGL-301-01-2122F

CHAP 210

tjaffer@amherst.edu
RELI-385-01,ASLC-385-01,ENGL-301-01

(Offered as RELI 385, ASLC 385 and ENGL 301) 

An exploration of several salient questions concerning the Qur’ān, the Islamic Revealed Book. How have Muslims explained the Qur’ān’s own proclamation of its supernatural origin and its miraculous quality?  How does the Qur’ān engage with and respond to the Hebrew Bible and Christian scriptures? Who has the authority to interpret the Qur’ān and why? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions that will occupy us over the course of the semester. We will also discuss the ways that the Qur’ān has been read as a work of law, theology, and mysticism, and how it has shaped theories of the state. Finally, we will isolate the Qur’ān from the Islamic tradition and explore the many ways that it can be read as a work of literature. 

All readings are in English. No prerequisites. 

Fall semester. Associate Professor Jaffer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Monica Ringer

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
HIST-190-01-2122F

CHAP 203

mmringer@amherst.edu
HIST-190-01,ASLC-126-01

(Offered as HIST 190 [ME/TC/TEP] and ASLC 126) This course surveys the history of the Middle East from the outset of the Islamic period to the beginning of the modern period. It is divided into the following segments: the formative period of Islam, the classical caliphates, the classical courts, the Mongols, and the great empires of the Ottomans and the Safavids. The course is organized chronologically and follows the making and breaking of empires and political centers; however, the focus of the course is on the intellectual, social, cultural and religious developments in these periods. Two class meetings per week.

The course is designed to have substantial preparation (online readings and occassionally powerpoint lectures) done in preparation for class sessions which will be devoted entirely to discussion. All readings are available online. There are frequent response papers due, but no formal papers. This course is an introduction to Middle Eastern history and anticipates no prior knowledge. 

Fall Semester. Professor Ringer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Monica Ringer

MW 08:30AM-09:50AM

Amherst College
HIST-392-01-2122F

CHAP 119

mmringer@amherst.edu
HIST-392-01,ASLC-359-01

(Offered as HIST 392 [ME/TC/TE] and ALSC 359) This course explores contemporary Iran from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective. The course provides an overall understanding of the modern history of Iran, with a focus on the way Iranian history has been variously constructed and deployed. We will utilize a wide variety of primary sources, including literature, film, political treatises, Shiite theological writing, foreign travel accounts, and U.S. state department documents, in addition to secondary sources. Course conducted as a seminar. Seminar paper optional. 2 class meetings/week.

Limited to 18 students. Fall semester. Professor Ringer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tariq Jaffer

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM

Amherst College
RELI-283-01-2122F

CHAP 210

tjaffer@amherst.edu
RELI-283-01,ASLC-283-01

(Offered as RELI 283 and ASLC 283) What is correct Islamic belief and practice? Is there such a thing? Who has been labeled a heretic, unbeliever, or apostate in the history of Islam, and why? How did Muslim “freethinkers” contest Islamic orthodoxies? We will discuss the ways that a wide variety of Muslim sects or denominations developed in the history of Islam. Our objectives are to examine how groups and individuals established, prescribed, or remade standards of Islamic belief and practice; and to examine how they faced the plurality of Muslim sects and other religions. We will pay special attention to the theme of salvation, which shaped the ways that Muslims classified sects and other religions. As we explore the above issues we will read from a range of Islamic discourses, including scripture, theology, law, and mysticism. All readings are in English. Open to all students.

Fall semester. Associate Professor Jaffer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tariq Jaffer

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
RELI-385-01-2122F

CHAP 210

tjaffer@amherst.edu
RELI-385-01,ASLC-385-01,ENGL-301-01

(Offered as RELI 385, ASLC 385 and ENGL 301) 

An exploration of several salient questions concerning the Qur’ān, the Islamic Revealed Book. How have Muslims explained the Qur’ān’s own proclamation of its supernatural origin and its miraculous quality?  How does the Qur’ān engage with and respond to the Hebrew Bible and Christian scriptures? Who has the authority to interpret the Qur’ān and why? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions that will occupy us over the course of the semester. We will also discuss the ways that the Qur’ān has been read as a work of law, theology, and mysticism, and how it has shaped theories of the state. Finally, we will isolate the Qur’ān from the Islamic tradition and explore the many ways that it can be read as a work of literature. 

All readings are in English. No prerequisites. 

Fall semester. Associate Professor Jaffer.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

John O. Weinert

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
ARA-100-01-202201

Burton 219

jweinert@smith.edu
An introduction to Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic, using a proficiency-based approach to develop communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic alphabet, and progresses quickly toward developing basic reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiencies and cultural competence using the Al-Kitaab series and a variety of authentic materials.  Students will acquire these skills through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work.  Students should be at the Novice-Mid level by the end of this course.  No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
5.00

John O. Weinert

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARA-100-02-202201

Burton 219

jweinert@smith.edu
An introduction to Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic, using a proficiency-based approach to develop communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course begins with a focus on reading, pronouncing and recognizing Arabic alphabet, and progresses quickly toward developing basic reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiencies and cultural competence using the Al-Kitaab series and a variety of authentic materials.  Students will acquire these skills through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work.  Students should be at the Novice-Mid level by the end of this course.  No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

May George

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARA-200-01-202201

Hillyer 109

mgeorge@smith.edu
This is a communication-oriented course in Arabic at the intermediate level, incorporating both Modern Standard and colloquial Arabic and providing students with an opportunity to hone their skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Students will expand their ability to create with the language while reinforcing fundamentals and expanding their knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, and culture. In addition to in-class teamwork, students will produce a variety of essays, presentations and skits throughout the semester.  Prerequisite: ARA 101 or its equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

May George

M W F 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
ARA-300-01-202201

Burton 219

mgeorge@smith.edu
This helps students achieve an advanced level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial variety using the four-skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) approach. Students read within a normal range of speed, listen to, discuss and respond in writing to authentic texts by writers from across the Arab world. Text types address a range of political, social, religious and literary themes and represent a range of genres, styles and periods. All of these texts may include hypothesis, argumentation and supported opinions that covers both linguistic and cultural knowledge. This course covers Al-Kitaab, Book 3, units 1–5 in addition to extra instructional materials. Prerequisite: ARA 202, or the completion of Al-Kitaab, Book 2, or its equivalent. Students must be able to use formal spoken Arabic as the medium of communication in the classroom.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanna Ferguson

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
HST-208-01-202201

Stoddard G2

sferguson06@smith.edu
MES 208-01, HST 208-01
Offered as MES 208 & HST 208. This course examines the history of the modern Middle East from a global perspective. How have gender, economy, ecology, and religion shaped Middle Eastern empires and nation-states within a broader world? The course begins with transformations in Egypt, Iran, and the Ottoman Empire between 1800 and World War I. Next, it turns to experiences of colonialism, the rise of independent nation-states, and the birth of new political movements. Overall, we will work to appreciate the diversity of the region’s cultures, languages, and peoples and to critically assess how the Middle East has been imagined from without and within. Enrollment limited to 40.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Joanna Caravita

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
JUD-101-01-202201

Seelye 102

jcaravita@smith.edu
The first half of a two-semester sequence introducing modern Hebrew language and culture, with a focus on equal development of the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Learning is amplified by use of online resources (YouTube, Facebook newspapers) and examples from Hebrew song and television/film. No previous knowledge of modern Hebrew is necessary. Enrollment limited to 18. This course is available to Mount Holyoke College students through a simultaneous video-conferencing option.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Steven Heydemann,Susanna Ferguson

W 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
MES-100-01-202201

Seelye 301

sheydemann@smith.edu,sferguson06@smith.edu
This 8-week course of weekly lectures will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the Middle East by focusing on the big questions that animate the teaching and research of faculty in Middle East Studies and related fields. Graded S/U.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanna Ferguson

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
MES-208-01-202201

Stoddard G2

sferguson06@smith.edu
MES 208-01, HST 208-01
Offered as MES 208 & HST 208. This course examines the history of the modern Middle East from a global perspective. How have gender, economy, ecology, and religion shaped Middle Eastern empires and nation-states within a broader world? The course begins with transformations in Egypt, Iran, and the Ottoman Empire between 1800 and World War I. Next, it turns to experiences of colonialism, the rise of independent nation-states, and the birth of new political movements. Overall, we will work to appreciate the diversity of the region’s cultures, languages, and peoples and to critically assess how the Middle East has been imagined from without and within. Enrollment limited to 40.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanna Ferguson

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
MES-213-01-202201

Seelye 306

sferguson06@smith.edu
This course invites students to explore how sexuality has been central to power and resistance in the Middle East. When and how have empires, colonial powers, and nation states tried to regulate intimacy, sex, love, and reproduction? How have sexual practices shaped social life, and how have perceptions of these practices changed over time? The course introduces theoretical tools for the history of sexuality and explores how contests over sexuality, reproduction, and the body shaped empires, colonial states, and nationalist projects. Finally, we examine contemporary debates about sexuality as a basis for political mobilization in the Middle East today. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Steven Heydemann

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
MES-217-01-202201

Seelye 202

sheydemann@smith.edu
The focus of this lecture course will be on the dynamics of inter-state relations in the broader Middle East (encompassing Turkey, Israel, and Iran). It will provide a brief introduction to relevant theoretical frameworks that have been used to explain the international and regional relations of the Middle East. It then applies these theoretical frameworks through in-depth attention to a wide range of themes and cases. In addition to readings on specific cases, the course will cover the origins and development of the Arab state system, alliance dynamics, the effects of oil on international relations, war and international relations, and the domestic sources of Middle East international relations.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
6.00

Nahla Khalil

TU TH 11:30AM 12:20PM; M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
10540

Herter Hall room 212

nkhalil@llc.umass.edu
This first semester of a year-long course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic, also known as Classical Arabic. It begins with a coverage of the alphabet, vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will concentrate on speaking and listening skills, as well as on learning the various forms of regular verbs, and on how to use an Arabic dictionary.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
6.00

Shaimaa Moustafa

TU TH 1:00PM 1:50PM; M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
10558

Herter Hall room 212

smoustaf@umass.edu
This first semester of a year-long course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic, also known as Classical Arabic. It begins with a coverage of the alphabet, vocabulary for everyday use, and essential communicative skills relating to real-life and task-oriented situations (queries about personal well-being, family, work, and telling the time). Students will concentrate on speaking and listening skills, as well as on learning the various forms of regular verbs, and on how to use an Arabic dictionary.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
6.00

Nahla Khalil

TU TH 1:00PM 1:50PM; M W F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
10541

Herter Hall room 204

nkhalil@llc.umass.edu
Students in this course will continue perfecting their knowledge of Arabic focusing on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be on the development of all language skills using a communicative-oriented, proficiency-based approach. By the end of the academic year, students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions as well as skills that will allow them to communicate in a variety of situations. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio and websites. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
6.00

John Weinert

M W F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
10557

Herter Hall room 640

jweinert@judnea.umass.edu
The course aims to help students achieve an Intermediate-High level of proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to one Arabic colloquial dialect through the practice of the four language skills.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Joanna Caravita

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
15415

Herter Hall room 110

jcaravita@umass.edu
Preparation for basic proficiency in speaking, writing, listening to, and reading Modern Hebrew. Emphasis on speaking. Language lab.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Ofir Zussman

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15410

Herter Hall room 444

ozussman@judnea.umass.edu
Fundamentals of classical Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, introduced through the reading of select biblical texts. Language lag, written and oral assignments, quizzes, tests. No previous background in Hebrew necessary.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Ofir Zussman

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
15406

Herter Hall room 444

ozussman@judnea.umass.edu
Continuation of HEBREW 110. Further preparation for basic proficiency in all four basic language skills, with emphasis on speaking. Language lab. Prerequisite: HEBREW 110.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Joanna Caravita

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15392

Herter Hall room 444

jcaravita@umass.edu
Continues study of modern Hebrew; increases proficiency in conversation, listening, and writing skills. Adapted short stories, audiovisual aids. Language lab. Prerequisite: HEBREW 120
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Anne Broadbridge

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
15478

Integ. Learning Center S211

broadbridge@history.umass.edu
This course will provide an introduction to the history of the Islamic world from the birth of the Prophet Muhammad in 570 CE to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad in 1258. It will focus on the origins and the tenets of Islam, then turn to an investigation of the cultures and societies that emerged from the interactions of Islam and the Muslim community with existing cultures and political systems. The course will address such issues as the military and political realities of the Islamic empires, economics and trade, the interaction between nomadism and sedentary life, and Middle Eastern models of just rule. It will also examine questions of religious sectarianism, race, philosophy and spirituality. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Hadi Jorati

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
23428

Herter Hall room 206

hjorati@umass.edu
23785
What was the world like at the time of the Rise of Islam and how did the new religion change the Global World Order? The Historical circumstance of the rise of Islam is often misunderstood and shrouded in mystery, or obfuscated by partisan bickering. In this course we take a historical analytical approach to the History of Islam and Empire, We will put under scrutiny the religious structure of the Late Antique Near East, the Rise of Islam and the early Arab conquests, to the establishment of the first Arab Empire and its transformation into a new "Islamic Empire" under the hegemony of the Abbasids. No prior background assumed. All readings in English.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Anne Broadbridge

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
15678

Herter Hall room 222

broadbridge@history.umass.edu
This course will investigate several different Islamic religious movements. It will focus on the ideas and beliefs of each movement, their cultural and historical contexts, and the historical effect that these movements have had. Topics will include the Sunni-Shiite division, Mysticism, Islamic Modernism, Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam, and "Fundamentallism" or Political Islam.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malissa Taylor

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
17788

Herter Hall room 117

taylor@umass.edu
In many textbooks, the history of the Middle East is the mirror opposite of European history. We are told that the Middle East was a rich and cosmopolitan region of the world in the Middle Ages, but that its failure to properly modernize led first to weakness and colonization and more recently to extremism and violence. While Europe soared ahead in the years between 1400 and 1800, the Middle East appeared to languish. Explaining why the Middle East failed to "keep up" with Europe has preoccupied a number of scholars. In contrast to the above, this course will question whether a narrative of European success and Middle Eastern failure is the most fruitful way to understand the transformations of the early modern period (1400-1800). While our focal point in the course will be the Middle East, we will use a comparative historical approach to investigate how the challenges of this era were navigated across the globe. We will examine topics such as the rise of the capitalism, the spread of new technologies and organizational models, and the evolution of the modern state. How did the peoples of the Middle East shape - as well as cope with - such massive changes? How did their adaptations compare with those of contemporaries in Asia, Africa and America as well as Europe? Using a framework of shared transformation, we will try to form a more nuanced view of what was gained and lost in the early modern Middle East. What aspects of the Middle Eastern experience were familiar in other parts of the world? What can our understanding of the past tell us about the possibilities for the Middle East's future? (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Hadi Jorati

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
17794

Herter Hall room 202

hjorati@umass.edu
23565
From the absorbing tales of the One Thousand and One Nights and the haunting melancholy of pre-Islamic poetry to the inimitable beauty of the Quran, Medieval Arabic literature is fascinating and inexhaustible. Via English translations, this course introduces students to a rich diversity of Arabic literary texts written from the sixth century to the dawn of the modern period, stretching from the cosmopolitan cities of Muslim Spain to the empires of Central Asia and beyond. Students evaluate significant texts in order to develop capacities for aesthetic and historical response and judgment; interpretation and evaluation; and critical listening, reading, seeing, thinking, and writing. Students understand the pluralistic nature of institutions, society, and culture across the world in order to become educated, productive, and principled citizens.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malissa Taylor

M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
17789

Herter Hall room 640

taylor@umass.edu
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Sufism, the mystical tradition of the Islamic world. The class focuses on the heartland of the Middle East, namely the eastern Arab lands, Turkey and Iran. No prerequisites are required. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

Program Chairs:

Andrew March, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Steven Heydemann, Professor in Middle East Studies; Director of Program in Middle East Studies, Smith College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator