Queer, Trans, and Sexuality Studies

The Five College Queer, Trans, and Sexuality Studies certificate provides undergraduate students an opportunity to pursue a course of study that critically examines the relationship between sexual and gender identities, experiences, cultures and communities in a wide range of historical and political contexts.

Working across disciplines, students take courses in a variety of fields. The certificate also leads students to investigate how non-normative and normative genders and sexualities intersect with other social categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, class and nationality.

The certificate is available to undergraduate students enrolled at Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College and the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

On This Page

Faculty

Frederick Griffiths, Professor, Classics: ftgriffiths@amherst.edu

Jen Manion, Professor, History and Sexuality, Women's, and Gender Studies: jmanion@amherst.edu

I am a social and cultural U.S. historian who works on questions of difference and power, particularly in regards to race, gender, and sexuality. I believe in the power of understanding the past for social movements in the present. I am dedicated to making LGBTQ histories more widely taught and accessible. Prior to joining Amherst College, I taught history and ran the LGBTQ Center at Connecticut College for ten years.

Khary Polk, Associate Professor, Black Studies and Sexuality, Women’s, and Gender Studies: kpolk@amherst.edu

I am a cultural historian of the African American diaspora, a specialist in twentieth century LGBTQ studies, and a scholar of race, gender, and sexuality in the U.S. military. Intersectional approaches to the study of difference have been central to my scholarly practice, and my work is influenced by and contributes to a number of interrelated fields, including critical race theory, performance studies, queer theory, queer of color critique, and black feminist thought. Understanding sexuality as not only a mode of expression but also a mode of regulation has been a key concern in my own work, both in my contributions of queer of color anthologies, my article on sexuality and black masculinity in Manning Marable’s biography of Malcolm X, as well as my forthcoming book on the history of America’s military conscription of gender, race, and sexual difference in the twentieth century. 

Steve Dillon, Associate Professor, Queer Studies: sdillon@hampshire.edu

Justin Crumbaugh, Associate Professor, Spanish, Latina/o, and Latin American Studies: jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu

I am the author of Destination Dictatorship: The Spectacle of Spain’s Tourist Boom and the Reinvention of Difference (SUNY Press, 2009) and co-author of Spanish Fascist Writing (U of Toronto Press, forthcoming). My publications also include articles on the cultural formations of the Franco dictatorship in Spain, tourism, terrorism, and political victimhood. The courses I have taught at Mount Holyoke College have addressed subjects such as the politics of filmmaking in Latin America, the idea of "underdevelopment" as it has been questioned in the Global South, fascism, the films of Pedro Almodóvar, and the work of Michel Foucault. 

Corey Flanders, Assistant Professor, Psychology and Education: cflander@mtholyoke.edu

I am an applied social psychologist, and my research interests focus on issues of identity and health equity, particularly as they relate to the experiences of queer and trans people. I use qualitative and quantitative approaches together with community-based research principles to understand how structural, community and individual factors like stigma and social support may impact people’s health and other lived experiences.

Christian Gundermann, Associate Professor, Gender Studies: cgunderm@mtholyoke.edu

Ren-Yo Hwang, Assistant Professor, Gender Studies and Critical Social Thought: rhwang@mtholyoke.edu

I work and teach on transformative justice, community and state accountability, feminist-of-color anti-violence activism, carceral studies, and queer/trans* of color critique and praxis. I am largely interested in how we might trace and account for abolitionist and insurgent knowledge-making practices, processes and alternative "our"chives with tools such as participatory action research and collaborative ethnography. My latest research studies state technologies of control, carcerality, datafication and reform-based state partnerships of the late 20th century, and how this has shaped legal, cultural and social movement discourses and strategies concerning minority violence to hate crimes. 

Jacquelyne Luce, Senior Lecturer, Gender Studies: jluce@mtholyoke.edu

Jacquelyne Luce is a Senior Lecturer in Gender Studies at Mount Holyoke College. Her teaching and research explore the interconnected worlds of activism, research, and care that contribute to the development, use and governance of emerging medical technologies, especially within the fields of assisted reproduction and genetics/genomics. She is currently engaged in two core research projects. One project focuses on narratives of rare disease diagnoses, patient-initiated research, participatory governance of scientific and biomedical research and perceptions of experimental risk, with a focus on mitochondrial diseases. The other project is mapping the queer traces of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen, through narrative interviews, archival research and public sphere representations chemically induced gender transgression. She is the author of Beyond Expectation: Lesbian/Bi/Queer Women and Assisted Conception (University of Toronto Press, 2010).

Jennifer Declue, Assistant Professor, Study of Women and Gender: jdeclue@smith.edu

Jina Kim, Assistant Professor, English Language & Literature and the Study of Women and Gender: jbkim@smith.edu

I am a literary scholar of feminist disability and feminist-of-color studies with a particular focus on contemporary writing by women and queers of color. My research and teaching interests emerge from the intersection of critical disability studies, feminist-of-color/ queer-of-color critique, and contemporary ethnic U.S. literatures. At Smith, I teach courses on gender and sexuality as they intersect with race and disability. 

Cameron Awkward-Rich, Assistant Professor, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies: cawkwardrich@umass.edu

I am an interdisciplinary scholar who holds a Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature; I work primarily in transgender studies, especially in its overlaps with disability studies and queer/feminist of color thought. At UMass, I teach courses in transgender history, theory, and literature; academic and creative writing; and affect studies.

Lee Badgett, Professor, Economics: lbadgett@econs.umass.edu

My current research focuses on poverty in the LGBT community, employment discrimination against LGBT people in the U.S. and China, and the cost of homophobia and transphobia in global economies. I have written several books and conducted groundbreaking work that debunked the myth of gay affluence and showed that same-sex marriage is good for the economy. My newest book, The Economic Case for LGBT Equality: Why Fair and Equal Treatment Benefits Us All, will be published in 2020 by Beacon Press. My work includes testifying as an expert witness before the U.S. Congress and in litigation, consulting with development agencies (World Bank and UNDP) and businesses, writing op-ed pieces, and speaking with journalists. I received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California-Berkeley and a BA in economics from the University of Chicago. 

John Bickford, Senior Lecturer II, Psychological and Brain Sciences: jbickfor@psych.umass.edu

I am a social psychologist who regularly teaches Introductory Psychology, Social Psychology, Personality Theory, and Psychology of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Experience. My past research involved the development of a multidimensional model and a corresponding self-report measure of sexual orientation as distinct from sexual identity. My other interests include social cognition, self-concept and identity, and social stigma. My teaching style is heavily influenced by my passions for social justice, self-acceptance, and empowerment of the marginalized.

Richard Chu, Five College Professor, History: rtchu@history.umass.edu

I have published various articles focusing on the history of the Chinese and Chinese mestizos in the Philippines and centering on issues of ethnicity, gender, and nationalism.  I am the author of Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture 1860s–1930s (E.J. Brill, 2010; Anvil 2012). Currently, I am working on my next book project entitled “The “Chinaman” Question in the Philippines: War, Empire, and Race,” and am co-editing an anthology on LGBT Studies in the Philippines entitled “More Tomboy, More Bakla Than We Admit: Insights into Sexual and Gender Diversity in Philippine Culture, History, and Politics.”

Stephen Miller, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures: smiller@asianlan.umass.edu

I received my Ph.D. in Japanese Language and Literature from UCLA with a concentration on premodern Japanese poetry. I have lived in Japan for a total of 9 years. A few years after I started teaching course in premodern Japanese literature at the university, I realized that I wanted to add Japanese queer culture to my teaching repertoire for personal reasons, so I slowly started teaching various iterations of such a course at the University of Colorado, Brown University, Smith College, and finally at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. It is important that anyone taking a course on Japanese queer culture with me realize that I have not been trained in queer/sexuality studies—that I am basically self-taught. The course that I teach approaches the themes and trends of Japanese queer life from a literary and cultural (cinema, mostly) point of view.  

Svati Shah, Associate Professor, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies: svatipshah@umass.edu

I am a cultural anthropologist who works on questions of sexuality, migration and historiography in South Asia. All of my research has used ethnography as a primary methodology. I have written on sex work and political economy, urbanization, and queer politics in India, and I am about to start on ecological politics in the north west of India. I teach courses on feminist theory, queer and trans politics in the Global South, and on race and caste. 

Angie Willey, Five College Associate Professor, Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies: awilley@wost.umass.edu

I am an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersections of queer feminist theory, critical relationality, and science studies. My teaching and research are shaped by my commitment to interrogating stories about what we are that naturalize capitalism and the forms of belonging on which it relies for the distribution of rights and resources. I teach classes on the history of sexuality and race; queer and postcolonial feminist science studies; queer feminist knowledge making about bodies and natures; and relationships and belonging.

Certificate Requirements

To obtain a Five College certificate in Queer, Trans, and Sexuality Studies, students must successfully complete a total of seven courses, with at least 21 credits. These courses should include: 

  • One intro/survey/topics/foundational course in queer/trans/sexuality studies
  • One intro/survey/topics/foundational course in critical race/transnational studies
  • Five courses that demonstrate study in more than one of the following areas: the Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Engineering
  • At least one of these five courses is at the 300-level or above 

For courses to count toward the certificate, they must have:

  • Significant queer/trans/sexuality studies content through reading and/or writing (i.e., a student can do a term paper focused in queer/trans/sexuality studies to enable a course to count that otherwise would not have significant enough content)
  • Sexuality studies courses are expected to challenge the assumption that heterosexuality is natural and normal and should not be using “gender” as shorthand for “women” or for “women and men” (i.e., not treating gender as a binary)

Courses

Spring 2022 Queer, Trans, and Sexuality Studies Courses

01
4.00

Mekhola S. Gomes

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
ASLC-376-01-2122S

CHAP204

mgomes@amherst.edu
HIST-376-01, ASLC-376-01, SWAG-377-01

(Offered as HIST 376 [AS/TC/TE/TR/TS], ASLC 376 [SA] and SWAG 377) This course explores how categories of sex, gender, and the body have been configured in South Asian history. We will draw upon primary sources including texts, images, films, and documentaries. We will also read scholarly literature that explores South Asian history through the analytics of sex, gender, and body. We will begin by exploring gender in early South Asian history through poetry in translation as well as selections from epic texts, including sections of the Kāmasūtra that may be widely known but are rarely analyzed within their original historical and courtly contexts in South Asia. Through these poetic and literary texts, we will explore notions of pleasure, love, and intimacy, analyze the intersections between imperialism, sexuality, gendered bodies and colonial rule, and critically examine colonial debates and legal regimes around “widow burning” or sati in colonial South Asia. Finally, we will examine connections between masculinity and the operation of exclusionary nationalisms through the policing of bodies, agency, and love in contemporary South Asia. Throughout, we will pay attention to how social, political, and ethical formations have interacted with gendered bodies and selves in South Asian history.

Two meetings per week.

Spring semester. Professor Gomes.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Watufani M. Poe

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
BLST-226-01-2122S

SCCEA019

wpoe@amherst.edu
BLST-226-01, LLAS-226-01, SWAG-226-01

(Offered as BLST 226[D], LLAS 226 and SWAG 226) This course focuses on Black Queer and Trans life and struggle as well as the cultural and intellectual contributions Black Queer and Trans have made to in numerous fields throughout the Americas (North and South). While for many years narratives of the lives of Black LGBTQ people have been silenced and erased due to stigma and intersectional oppression on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality, scholars and artists in the past four decades have worked to recover the stories of Black Queer and Trans communities throughout the diaspora. The Black Queer/Trans Americas will dive into works that highlight these cultural contributions, while also understanding the compounded systemic violence that Black LGBTQ communities have faced and continue to face. By the end of this course students will have a strong understanding of how systems of power work to restrict the freedoms of Black Queer and Trans communities, and how Black LGBTQ people have lived, organized, and created in spite of and in response to these oppressions. This interdisciplinary undergraduate upper level course will utilize academic texts accompanied by poetry, fiction, film, television, and visual art to understand Black Queer and Trans subjectivities. In addition to course materials, the class will also make use of presentations from local artists, activists, and community members in the local area to add to the course experience. Every week will focus on a different theme or field of study related to Black LGBTQ+ life. 

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Poe.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Mekhola S. Gomes

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
HIST-376-01-2122S

CHAP204

mgomes@amherst.edu
HIST-376-01, ASLC-376-01, SWAG-377-01

(Offered as HIST 376 [AS/TC/TE/TR/TS], ASLC 376 [SA] and SWAG 377) This course explores how categories of sex, gender, and the body have been configured in South Asian history. We will draw upon primary sources including texts, images, films, and documentaries. We will also read scholarly literature that explores South Asian history through the analytics of sex, gender, and body. We will begin by exploring gender in early South Asian history through poetry in translation as well as selections from epic texts, including sections of the Kāmasūtra that may be widely known but are rarely analyzed within their original historical and courtly contexts in South Asia. Through these poetic and literary texts, we will explore notions of pleasure, love, and intimacy, analyze the intersections between imperialism, sexuality, gendered bodies and colonial rule, and critically examine colonial debates and legal regimes around “widow burning” or sati in colonial South Asia. Finally, we will examine connections between masculinity and the operation of exclusionary nationalisms through the policing of bodies, agency, and love in contemporary South Asia. Throughout, we will pay attention to how social, political, and ethical formations have interacted with gendered bodies and selves in South Asian history.

Two meetings per week.

Spring semester. Professor Gomes.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jen Manion

T 01:30 PM-04:15 PM

Amherst College
HIST-381-01-2122S

CHAP201

jmanion@amherst.edu
HIST-381-01, SWAG-381-01

(Offered as HIST 381 [TC/TR/TS] and SWAG 381). This seminar will explore the histories of transgender identities, activism, and communities around the world. Some questions to be engaged include: What concepts have been used to understand gender variant, expansive, and nonconforming people throughout history? How have war, violence, and legacies of colonialism, enslavement, and exploitation shaped the terms and conditions by which people of transgender experience and expression understood themselves and were perceived by others? How have transgender people advocated for self-determination, legal rights, and medical care? How has the transgender rights movement intersected with the civil, disability, women’s, and the LGBTQ rights movements? Students will work with primary sources such as newspaper accounts, legal codes, medical journals, religious texts, memoirs, and manifestos as well as pathbreaking historic studies of transgender people in China, England, Germany, Iran, Thailand, and the United States.

One class meeting per week. Limited to 18 students. Spring Semester. Professor Manion.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Watufani M. Poe

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-226-01-2122S

SCCEA019

wpoe@amherst.edu
BLST-226-01, LLAS-226-01, SWAG-226-01

(Offered as BLST 226[D], LLAS 226 and SWAG 226) This course focuses on Black Queer and Trans life and struggle as well as the cultural and intellectual contributions Black Queer and Trans have made to in numerous fields throughout the Americas (North and South). While for many years narratives of the lives of Black LGBTQ people have been silenced and erased due to stigma and intersectional oppression on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality, scholars and artists in the past four decades have worked to recover the stories of Black Queer and Trans communities throughout the diaspora. The Black Queer/Trans Americas will dive into works that highlight these cultural contributions, while also understanding the compounded systemic violence that Black LGBTQ communities have faced and continue to face. By the end of this course students will have a strong understanding of how systems of power work to restrict the freedoms of Black Queer and Trans communities, and how Black LGBTQ people have lived, organized, and created in spite of and in response to these oppressions. This interdisciplinary undergraduate upper level course will utilize academic texts accompanied by poetry, fiction, film, television, and visual art to understand Black Queer and Trans subjectivities. In addition to course materials, the class will also make use of presentations from local artists, activists, and community members in the local area to add to the course experience. Every week will focus on a different theme or field of study related to Black LGBTQ+ life. 

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Poe.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Katrina Karkazis

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
SWAG-200-01-2122S

WEBS220

kkarkazis@amherst.edu

In this course we will investigate contemporary feminist thought from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will focus on key issues in feminist theory, such as the sex/gender debate, sexual desire and the body, the political economy of gender, the creation of the "queer" as subject, and the construction of masculinity, among others. This course aims also to think through the ways in which these concerns intersect with issues of race, class, the environment and the nation.

This course fulfills a requirement for the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights and Justice (RHRJ) certificate.

Requisite: Open to first-year students who have taken SWAG 100 and upper-class students. Spring semester. Professor Karkazis.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jen Manion

T 01:30 PM-04:15 PM

Amherst College
SWAG-381-01-2122S

CHAP201

jmanion@amherst.edu
HIST-381-01, SWAG-381-01

(Offered as HIST 381 [TC/TR/TS] and SWAG 381). This seminar will explore the histories of transgender identities, activism, and communities around the world. Some questions to be engaged include: What concepts have been used to understand gender variant, expansive, and nonconforming people throughout history? How have war, violence, and legacies of colonialism, enslavement, and exploitation shaped the terms and conditions by which people of transgender experience and expression understood themselves and were perceived by others? How have transgender people advocated for self-determination, legal rights, and medical care? How has the transgender rights movement intersected with the civil, disability, women’s, and the LGBTQ rights movements? Students will work with primary sources such as newspaper accounts, legal codes, medical journals, religious texts, memoirs, and manifestos as well as pathbreaking historic studies of transgender people in China, England, Germany, Iran, Thailand, and the United States.

One class meeting per week. Limited to 18 students. Spring Semester. Professor Manion.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanne Mrozik

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
117000

Skinner Hall 212

smrozik@mtholyoke.edu
116609,116721,117000
Do bodies matter in religious traditions? Whose bodies matter? How do they matter? By studying religious body ideals and practices, we examine the possibilities and problems different kinds of bodies have posed in religious traditions. Topics include religious diet, exercise, and dress; monasticism, celibacy, and sexuality; healing rituals, and slavery and violence. We pay special attention to contemporary challenges to problematic body ideals and practices coming from feminist, disability, postcolonial, queer, and trans theorists and activists.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andrea Lawlor

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116632

Shattuck Hall 107

alawlor@mtholyoke.edu
116632,117109
What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about creative writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rachel Corbman

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
117153

Shattuck Hall 107

rcorbman@mtholyoke.edu
This course investigates the historical imbrication of modern concepts of "disability," "queer," and "trans." First, we trace the circulation of ideas about race, gender, sexuality, and disability within institutional medicine in the late 19th and early 20th century. Following this, we explore the individual experiences and political movements of people hailed under the categories of "disabled," "queer," or "trans" from the 20th century to the present. In resisting a reification of disability, queer, and trans as discrete fields of study, this course asks how we understand these categories in the present, while leaving room to imagine otherwise.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanne Mrozik

MW 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
116727

Skinner Hall 210

smrozik@mtholyoke.edu
116605,116727
Can women become Buddhas? Why is the Buddha called a "mother"? Who gets to ordain? Why would anyone choose celibacy? Who engages in religious sexual practices and why? This course examines the centrality of gender to Buddhist texts, practices, and institutions. We pay particular attention to the challenges and opportunities Buddhist traditions have offered women in different historical and cultural contexts. Throughout the course we consider various strategies of empowerment, including feminist, postcolonial, queer, trans*, and womanist.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116724

Ciruti 127

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116526,116997,116724
What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sarah Stefana Smith

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116720

Shattuck Hall 318

sarahstefanasmith@mtholyoke.edu
116720,117129,117130
At once viewed as a dysfunction of normative ideas about sexuality, the family, and the nation, Black sexualities are intimately linked to and regulated by political and socioeconomic discourses. Slavery studies scholars remind us of how it has proven foundational for modern notions of race and sex by making explicit links between labor and exploitation. Thus, this course moves through themes such as slavery historicity, intersections between Black feminisms and Black sexualities, sexual labor/work, pleasure, and the erotic, in order to consider the stakes of our current critical approaches to Black sexual economies and interrogate its silences and possibilities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jennifer M. DeClue

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
SWG-290-01-202203

Seelye 311

jdeclue@smith.edu
In this course we will consider the manner in which norms of gender and sexuality are reflected, reinforced, and challenged in popular culture. We use theories of knowledge production, representation, and meaning-making to support our analysis of the relationship between discourse and power; our engagement with these theoretical texts helps us track this dynamic as it emerges in popular culture. Key queer theoretical concepts provide a framework for examining how the production gender and sexuality impacts cultural production. Through our critical engagement with a selection of films, music, television, visual art, and digital media we will discuss mainstream conventions and the feminist, queer, and queer of color interventions that enliven the landscape of popular culture with which we contend in everyday life. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisite: SWG 150 or permission of the instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jennifer M. DeClue

W 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
SWG-303-01-202203

Seelye 302

jdeclue@smith.edu
Students in this course gain a thorough and sustained understanding of queer of color critique by tracking this theoretical framework from its emergence in women of color feminism through the contemporary moment using historical and canonical texts along with the most cutting-edge scholarship being produced in the field. In our exploration of this critical framework, we engage with independent films, novels and short stories, popular music, as well as television and digital media platforms such as Netflix and Amazon. We discuss what is ruptured and what is generated at intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality. Prerequisites: SWG 150. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

John Bickford

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
34388

Tobin Hall room 307

jbickfor@psych.umass.edu
Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
3.00

Cameron Awkward-Rich

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
36829

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 113

cawkwardrich@umass.edu
This survey of transgender studies will introduce students to the major concepts and current debates within the field. Drawing on a range of theoretical texts, historical case studies, and creative work, we will track the emergence of ?transgender? as both an object of study and a way of knowing. In particular, we will ask: what does it mean to ?study? ?transgender?? This guiding question will lead us to consider the varied meanings of ?trans? and how these meanings have been shaped by regimes of gender, racism, colonization, ableism, and medical and legal regulation; the tensions and intimacies between trans, disability, anti-racist, queer, and feminist theory/politics; and how `trans? might help us to imagine other, more just worlds.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Cameron Awkward-Rich

W 2:30PM 5:00PM

UMass Amherst
36912

Bartlett Hall room 206

cawkwardrich@umass.edu
36913
Since its coining at the turn of the twenty-first century, queer of color critique (and later trans of color critique) has come to name the vital project of queer/trans theorizing attentive to the racial and colonial histories that undergird the categories of "gender" and "sexuality." In this mixed grad/undergrad seminar, we will first trace the development of trans/queer of color critique in the United States as simultaneously a continuation of black and woman of color feminism as they were articulated in the 1970s/80s; a site of disidentification with queer and trans theory; and a practice emerging from trans/queer of color expressive culture and world-making. In the second half of the class, we will ask after how trans/queer of color thought helps us to know about disability, migration, settler colonialism, sex, erotics, and aesthetics, among other key terms.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Cameron Awkward-Rich

W 2:30PM 5:00PM

UMass Amherst
36913

Bartlett Hall room 206

cawkwardrich@umass.edu
36912
Since its coining at the turn of the twenty-first century, queer of color critique (and later trans of color critique) has come to name the vital project of queer/trans theorizing attentive to the racial and colonial histories that undergird the categories of ?gender? and ?sexuality.? In this mixed grad/undergrad seminar, we will first trace the development of trans/queer of color critique in the United States as simultaneously a continuation of black and woman of color feminism as they were articulated in the 1970s/80s; a site of disidentification with queer and trans theory; and a practice emerging from trans/queer of color expressive culture and world-making. In the second half of the class, we will ask after how trans/queer of color thought helps us to know about disability, migration, settler colonialism, sex, erotics, and aesthetics, among other key terms.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Fall 2022 Queer, Trans, and Sexuality Studies Courses

01
4.00

Ren-yo Hwang

TTH 09:00AM-10:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118594
rhwang@mtholyoke.edu
118580,118594
In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Susanne Mrozik

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
118595
smrozik@mtholyoke.edu
118242,118595
What do religions say about disability? How do people with disabilities engage with religious texts, images, practices, and communities? Drawing on different religions and cultures, the course explores the challenges and resources disability offers to religious communities. We study religious narratives that link disability to sin or karma and alternative narratives that reimagine the divine as disabled; access to worship spaces and rituals; ways healthcare professionals can support the religious needs of disabled clients; and the Disability Justice movement, which foregrounds the interlocking oppressions of disability, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 10:30AM-11:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
118596
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
118632,118596
This course examines the relationship between the urban and Latina/o/x placemaking, identities and culture(s). Urban scholars have long studied the "evolving" city-this course explores the changing city in relation to Latina/o/x populations and urban social change movements. We examine historical and contemporary conditions and cover a broad range of topics including: urbanization, urban planning, "new urbanism," placemaking, gentrification, migration/immigration, segregation, and more. The readings in this course aim to provoke a consideration of the dynamic between space and place, as well as how urban life, culture, and form impacts Latina/o/x populations and vice versa.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Iyko Day

TTH 09:00AM-10:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118836
iday@mtholyoke.edu
118180,118836
This course introduces students to Asian American literature, considering its historical origins and evolution. Throughout the course we explore questions of identity, immigration and citizenship, generational conflict, war and migration, and mixed and cross-racial politics. Readings of primary texts will be supplemented by historical and critical source materials. Authors may include Nina Revoyr, Ruth Ozeki, Nam Le, Chang-rae Lee, Aimee Phan, Susan Choi, and Jhumpa Lahiri.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118598
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
118633,118598
Latina/o/x Studies in Action explores university/college-community partnerships and civic engagement with/in Latina/o/x communities in the United States. Drawing from the field of Latina/o/x Studies, the course explores and interrogates "traditional" academic understandings of knowledge production, research, and service learning. Focusing on questions of power, inequality, and social change, this course will examine how university/college-community partnerships can be based on reciprocity, exchange, and the centering of community assets, needs, and voices.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ren-yo Hwang

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118599
rhwang@mtholyoke.edu
118587,118599
This seminar will offer close theoretical readings of a variety of anti-colonial, abolitionist, anti-imperialist, insurgent and feminist-of-color memoir, autobiographical and social justice texts. We will read works from Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Assata Shakur, Patrisse Cullors, Grace Lee Boggs, Audre Lorde, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarsinna, Leila Khaled, Fannie Lou Hamer, Sarah Ahmed, Lee Maracle, Kai Cheng Thom, Angela Davis, Sojourner Truth, adrienne maree brown, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Mary Brave Bird, Jamaica Kincaid, Gabby Rivera and Haunani-Kay Trask. We will center the interlinking and capacious concepts of liberation, revolution, freedom, justice and decolonization.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sarah Stefana Smith

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118600
sarahstefanasmith@mtholyoke.edu
118588,118791,118600,118667
Reading across a spectrum of disciplinary focuses (e.g. philosophies of aesthetics, post-structural feminisms, Black cultural studies, and queer of color critique) this course asks the question what is the nature of aesthetics when it negotiates modes of difference? This course explores the history and debates on aesthetics as it relates to race, gender, and sexuality with particular emphasis on Black diaspora theory and cultural production. Drawing on sensation, exhibitions, active discussion, observation, and experimentation, emphasis will be placed on developing a fine-tuned approach to aesthetic inquiry and appreciation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Meredith Coleman-Tobias

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118601
mfcoleman@mtholyoke.edu
118246,118166,118601
This course seeks to understand how protest fuels the creation and sustenance of black religious movements and novel spiritual systems in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine the dissentive qualities of selected African American activists, community workers, scholars, spiritual/religious leaders and creative writers. By the end of this course, students will be able to thoughtfully respond to the questions, "What is spirituality?"; "What is dissent?"; and "Has blackness required resistive spiritual communities?"
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Angela Willey

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118835
awilley@mtholyoke.edu
118834,118835
The erotic is a rich site of queer feminist thinking about the costs of the imposition of sexuality as an interpretive grid. The course begins with the study of sexuality as a knowledge system, with a focus on racial and colonial histories of sexuality, then moves on to considerations of the erotic. In both Lordean and Foucauldian genealogies, eros operates as a set of possibilities, or capacities -- for pleasure, joy, fulfilment, satisfaction -- that exceed "sexuality" and can inspire ways of rethinking nature, need, and relationality. Lynne Huffer, L.H. Stallings, Adrienne Marie Brown, Sharon Holland, and Ela Przybylo, among others, help us think capaciously about what the erotic can do.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kate Singer

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
118602
ksinger@mtholyoke.edu
118186,118602
The "age of revolution" saw revolts in the Black Atlantic world: Americans rebelled against the British; Native Americans opposed white colonists; bourgeoisie vied for power against the aristocracy; women decried patriarchal imprisonment; Latin American creoles resisted Spanish imperialists; and slaves threw off their masters. This course considers these diverse narratives of revolution as a series of social, political, and philosophical movements to change "biopolitics" (control of life) and "necropolitics" (control via death). We will read revolutionary tracts, slave narratives, and abolitionary literature alongside critical theory to consider how these authors offer ways of living and surviving Western, racial imperialisms.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ren-yo Hwang

TTH 09:00AM-10:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118580
rhwang@mtholyoke.edu
118580,118594
In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ying Wang

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118581
yingwang@mtholyoke.edu
118202,118135,118581
Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kate Singer

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118582
ksinger@mtholyoke.edu
118178,118582
With the onslaught of American, French, Haitian, and South American revolts and revolutions, the Atlantic world, much of Europe, and its colonial/industrial empire were thrown into a period of refiguring the concept of the raced, national, and gendered subject. This course considers what new forms of gender, sex, sexuality, and being were created, practiced, or thought, however momentarily, in this tumultuous age. Specific attention is given to conceptions of nonbinary being (of all varieties). Authors may include E. Darwin, Equiano, Wollstonecraft, Lister, M. Shelley, Byron, Jacobs.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Christian Gundermann

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
118585
cgunderm@mtholyoke.edu
We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ren-yo Hwang

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118587
rhwang@mtholyoke.edu
118587,118599
This seminar will offer close theoretical readings of a variety of anti-colonial, abolitionist, anti-imperialist, insurgent and feminist-of-color memoir, autobiographical and social justice texts. We will read works from Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Assata Shakur, Patrisse Cullors, Grace Lee Boggs, Audre Lorde, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarsinna, Leila Khaled, Fannie Lou Hamer, Sarah Ahmed, Lee Maracle, Kai Cheng Thom, Angela Davis, Sojourner Truth, adrienne maree brown, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Mary Brave Bird, Jamaica Kincaid, Gabby Rivera and Haunani-Kay Trask. We will center the interlinking and capacious concepts of liberation, revolution, freedom, justice and decolonization.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sarah Stefana Smith

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118588
sarahstefanasmith@mtholyoke.edu
118588,118791,118600,118667
Reading across a spectrum of disciplinary focuses (e.g. philosophies of aesthetics, post-structural feminisms, Black cultural studies, and queer of color critique) this course asks the question what is the nature of aesthetics when it negotiates modes of difference? This course explores the history and debates on aesthetics as it relates to race, gender, and sexuality with particular emphasis on Black diaspora theory and cultural production. Drawing on sensation, exhibitions, active discussion, observation, and experimentation, emphasis will be placed on developing a fine-tuned approach to aesthetic inquiry and appreciation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Nieves Romero-Díaz

TTH 10:30AM-11:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
118589
rdiaz@mtholyoke.edu
118652,118589
During the Spanish Empire (16th-18th centuries), witches, prostitutes, transvestite warriors, lesbians, daring noblewomen and nuns violated the social order by failing to uphold the expected sexual morality of the "ideal woman." They were silenced, criticized, punished, and even burned at the stake. Students will study contradictory discourses of good and evil and beauty and ugliness in relation to gender in the Spanish Empire. We will analyze historical and literary texts as well as film versions of so-called "bad" women -- such as the Celestina, Elena/o de Céspedes, Catalina de Erauso and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Angela Willey

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118834
awilley@mtholyoke.edu
118834,118835
The erotic is a rich site of queer feminist thinking about the costs of the imposition of sexuality as an interpretive grid. The course begins with the study of sexuality as a knowledge system, with a focus on racial and colonial histories of sexuality, then moves on to considerations of the erotic. In both Lordean and Foucauldian genealogies, eros operates as a set of possibilities, or capacities -- for pleasure, joy, fulfilment, satisfaction -- that exceed "sexuality" and can inspire ways of rethinking nature, need, and relationality. Lynne Huffer, L.H. Stallings, Adrienne Marie Brown, Sharon Holland, and Ela Przybylo, among others, help us think capaciously about what the erotic can do.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sarah Bacon

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
118590
sbacon@mtholyoke.edu
118122,118590
Pregnancy is a stunning feat of physiology. It is a conversation between two bodies -- parental and fetal -- whose collective action blurs the very boundaries of the individual. In this course we will explore such questions as: what is pregnancy, and how does the ephemeral, essential organ known as the placenta call pregnancy into being? How is pregnancy sustained? How does it end? We will consider the anatomy of reproductive systems and the hormonal language of reproduction. We will investigate the nature of "sex" hormones, consider racial disparities in pregnancy outcome, and weigh the evidence that the intrauterine environment influences disease susceptibility long after birth.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
118591
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
118653,118591
In this course we will read and discuss a group of short stories written by contemporary female, queer and trans Latin American authors. These stories deal with (among other weird feelings and states) the uncanny, the unsettling and the horror of daily life as well as processes of becoming, embodiment and disidentification. This course considers the intersections of identity and imagination, race, gender, and class. Special attention is given to the way in which these writings depict oppression and resilience and how they reinvent the Latin American short story writing tradition. Authors may include Ivan Monalisa, Guadalupe Nettel, Mariana Enriquez, Camila Sosa, and Claudia Salazar.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

Program Co-Chairs:

Ren-Yo Hwang, Assistant Professor of Gender Studies and Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College

Jina Kim, Assistant Professor of Study of Women and Gender, Smith College

Khary PolkAssistant Professor of Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies, Amherst College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator