Film and Media Studies

The Five College Film Council works to coordinate the study of film and video at all five campuses.

The members of the Council include faculty members drawn from a number of disciplines ranging from foreign languages to literature, history and media studies. They meet regularly to exchange information about courses as well as faculty appointments, and plan a coordinated approach to meeting common needs for instruction.

The Five College Film and Media Studies program is supported by one joint faculty appointee who provides instruction in film and video production to complement courses in film theory and history offered at each campus: Bernadine Mellis.

The Council also sponsors an annual student film and video festival, held during the spring semester.

The Five College FC Film Studies Announcements email list is open to faculty, staff and students interested in Film Studies to share announcements and information. Visit the Five Colleges Film Studies Announcements page to subscribe or unsubscribe.

The email list for Five College Film Studies Council business is for faculty members only. Visit the FC-Film-Council page to request to subscribe or unsubscribe.  Please contact the Five College Academic Programs office for more information about joining these email lists.

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Courses

Spring 2022 Film and Media Studies Courses

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

The Department

TTH 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-221-01-2122S
tdepartment@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-01, FAMS-221-01

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adam R. Levine

MW 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-335-01-2122S
alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-335-01, FAMS-335-01

(Offered as ARHA 335 and FAMS 335) This intermediate production course surveys the outer limits of cinematic expression and provides an overview of creative 16mm film production. We will begin by making cameraless projects through drawing, painting and scratching directly onto the film strip before further exploring the fundamentals of 16mm technology, including cameras, editing and hand-processing. While remaining aware of our creative choices, we will invite chance into our process and risk failure, as every experiment inevitably must.

Through screenings of original film prints, assigned readings and discussion, the course will consider a number of experimental filmmakers and then conclude with a review of exhibition and distribution strategies for moving image art. All students will complete a number of short assignments on film and one final project on either film or video, each of which is to be presented for class critique. One three-hour class and one film screening per week.

Requisite: One 200-level production course or relevant experience (to be discussed with the instructor in advance of the first class). Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Levine.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adam R. Levine

MW 09:00 AM-11:00 AM

Amherst College
ARHA-444-01-2122S
alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-444-01, FAMS-412-01

(Offered as ARHA 444 and FAMS 412) Essay filmmaking is a dynamic form with many commonly cited attributes—the presence of an authorial voice, an emphasis on broad themes, an eclectic approach to genre, and the tendency to digress or draw unexpected connections. Yet, true to its nature, the precise definition of the essay film is in constant flux. It can be both personal and political, individual and collective, noble and mischievous. Essay filmmakers themselves are equally diverse, ranging from established film auteurs to Third Cinema activists and contemporary video artists.

If we entertain the notion that the processes of cinema closely resemble the mechanics of human thought, then the essay film may be the medium’s purest expression. To watch or make such a film, we must give ourselves over to a compulsive, restless energy that delights in chasing a subject down any number of rabbit holes and blind alleys, often stopping to admire the scenery on the way. As with thought, there is no end product, no clear boundaries, no goal but the activity itself.

The term "essay" finds its origins in the French essayer, meaning “to attempt” or to try.” In this advanced production workshop, we will read, screen and discuss examples of the essayistic mode in literature and cinema while making several such attempts of our own. Students will complete a series of writing assignments and video projects informed by class materials and group discussion.

Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Levine.

Requisite: One 200-level production course or relevant experience (to be discussed with the instructor in advance of the first class). 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sara J. Brenneis, Timothy J. Van Compernolle

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
ASLC-327-01-2122S
sbrenneis@amherst.edu tvancompernolle@amherst.edu
ASLC-327-01, FAMS-327-01, EUST-327-01

(Offered as ASLC 327, EUST 327, and FAMS 327) The relationships among media, the state, and civil society are complex.  This course aims to address these relationships by examining cinema—the art form of the twentieth century—in Japan and Spain during different but overlapping eras of tumult: the 1930s to the 1980s. Putting these two national cinemas in a comparative framework will allow us to address issues such as: the interest in film by authoritarian regimes; the way cinema is harnessed to wartime goals by the state; the nature of censorship and self-censorship in war and peace; the potential of image, sound, and narrative to give expression to propaganda and democratic ideals; the cathartic release following the end of an authoritarian regime or occupation. The course, taught in English, does not assume prior knowledge of either country, nor of film studies. All films have English subtitles.

Spring semester. Professors Brenneis and Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua M. Guilford

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM; M 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-280-01-2122S
jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-280-01, FAMS-210-01

(Offered as ENGL 280 and FAMS 210) An introduction to cinema studies through consideration of key critical terms, together with a selection of various films (classic and contemporary, foreign and American, popular and avant-garde) for illustration and discussion. The terms for discussion may include, among others: modernity, montage, realism, visual pleasure, ethnography, choreography, streaming, and consumption. Two class meetings and one screening per week.

Limited to 35 students. Spring semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Pooja G. Rangan

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-284-01-2122S
prangan@amherst.edu
ENGL-284-01, FAMS-216-01

(Offered as ENGL 284 and FAMS 216) What do we mean when we talk about “the media”? Coming to Terms: Media will parse this question, approaching the media not as a shadowy monolith but as a complex and changing environment comprised of varied technologies, formats, practices, devices, and platforms (e.g.: photography, gramophone records, online dating, smartphones, Netflix). The course will introduce key terms and critical approaches for the study of modern media in their specificity in an era of digital mediation. We will ask questions such as: What are the formal and technical features of different media? How do they construct us as spectators or users, and shape our perception of the world we inhabit? How do our media practices produce experiences of space, time, and community? And crucially, what are the ideological impacts of these perceptions, constructions, and practices when it comes to race, sex, identity, and the circulation of power and capital?

Each week students will encounter important works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century media and cultural theory and will encounter concrete examples to flesh out the abstract concepts in the readings and engage in ample class participation. Assignments will encourage students to enter into a conversation with these texts as a way of exploring and constructing arguments about contemporary media. The course will provide a strong foundation for advanced work in film and media studies, and related disciplines.

This course has no prerequisites, but it is best suited to students who have completed a 100-level course dealing with the analysis of literature or film. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Rangan.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lise Shapiro Sanders

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM; SU 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-374-01-2122S
lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-374-01, FAMS-374-01

(Offered as ENGL 374 and FAMS 374) Gothic fictions are known for their ability to send shivers down the spine, evoking sensations of discomfort, fear, and horror. This interdisciplinary course will explore the genre of the Gothic from its roots in the late eighteenth century through the present, moving among literature, film, television, and digital media forms. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein will be a key text; we will explore intermedial texts like Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Bram Stoker’s Dracula; and the course will end with twenty-first century incarnations of the Gothic (Get Out, Penny Dreadful). Throughout, we will discuss the tangled relationship between sexuality, race, and power that characterizes the genre. Students will  develop a creative project, whether a piece of short fiction or a visual/digital exploration of Gothic themes, keep a weekly reading/viewing journal of their responses to the assigned texts, and facilitate discussion on a given text. In addition, students will write a 3- to 5-page close textual analysis, with a mandatory peer review workshop and revision, and a final research paper (10-12 pages) or creative project. Students will gain a familiarity with key literary and film/media studies terms and approaches; an understanding of major works in the Gothic and horror genres; an ability to think and write critically about Gothic literature and related media, in terms of aesthetics, historical development, and cultural context; confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays in literary studies, cultural studies, and film and media studies; and proficiency in various aspects of project-based work, including identifying a research topic, building arguments, using evidence, and working with and appropriately citing a variety of sources.

Requisite: A 200-level foundations course in English or Film & Media Studies, or equivalent. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Pooja G. Rangan

MW 08:30 AM-09:50 AM; T 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-378-01-2122S
prangan@amherst.edu
ENGL-378-01, FAMS-382-01

(Offered as ENGL 378 and FAMS 382)

Calls to defund the police may have helped to cancel the notorious reality program COPS, but crime scenes, courtrooms, cops, lawyers, victims, and vigilantes dominate our media and our imaginations. This course asks what needs to be abolished—not just canceled—in our media environment in order for us to imagine a world without prisons. Abolition is, at its core, a transformative project that aims to change the very social relations, conditions, and logics that produce the harms for which police and prisons seem to serve as solutions. A project that once took on the seemingly impossible challenge of ending slavery, abolition has become a movement of interlinked struggles against systemic oppression. We will examine a range of media, historical and contemporary, cinematic and televisual, fictional and documentary, global and local, through the lens of abolition, deconstructing carceral scenarios and affects, and discovering and imagining transformative approaches to narrative, healing, and justice. Students enrolling in this course should be prepared to take on a range of activities including and beyond weekly readings, film/media viewing, and analytical writing, such as independent and collaborative research, site-based field work (if public health guidelines permit), and optional creative media assignments.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first-year students with consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Rangan.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua M. Guilford

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM; SU 04:00 PM-07:00 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-383-01-2122S
jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-383-01, FAMS-360-01

(Offered as ENGL 383 and FAMS 360] What’s intimate about cinema? And what, if anything, is cinematic about intimacy? Since its invention, cinema has been closely associated with intimate experience, though understandings of this association have shifted over time. For classical film theorists, cinema’s intimate devices (the close-up, the kiss, etc.) were often invested with revolutionary potential, though more recent cultural theorists have issued strong rejoinders to such claims. Isn’t intimacy crucial to the workings of modern power? Doesn’t cinema structure intimate relations in accordance with normative ideologies? Examining a range of intimate film cultures–from early cinema to surrealism, classical Hollywood, Black British film, and queer world cinema–this course will explore the intimate dimensions of filmic representation and reception, and the reasons cinema’s intimacy has been both celebrated and denounced. Assignments include in-class presentations, critical essays, and weekly entries in personal film journals.

Requisite: One 200-level ENGL or FAMS course, or consent of the instructor. Not open to first-year students. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lise Shapiro Sanders

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
ENGL-475-01-2122S
lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-475-01, FAMS-431-01

(Offered as ENGL 475 and FAMS 431) Fashion has long been associated with frivolity, ephemerality, and triviality. Yet trends in clothing and design are irrevocably linked to politics, technology, society, and cultural change–from hats to hemlines to heels, fashion can reveal the transformations of an era. How has fashion evolved in the modern age, and what is its relationship to literature, film, and other media forms? What can fashion teach us about our past, present, and future? This advanced seminar will delve into the interdisciplinary field of fashion studies to examine the vicissitudes of fashion from the nineteenth century onward, focusing on Britain, Europe, and the United States, with an eye toward the role of imperialism, Orientalism, and cultural appropriation in shaping fashion’s tangled histories. Students will study literary texts; film and television; print, visual, and digital media; and material culture. Potential case studies include the dandy, the New Woman, and the flapper; wartime fashions; subcultural style; the wedding gown; the sneaker; among other topics. Students will do independent research, culminating in a written research project and/or curated digital exhibit; keep a weekly reading/viewing journal recording their critical responses to the assigned texts; and facilitate discussion on a given topic. Students can expect to gain: a familiarity with key terms and approaches in fashion studies, media studies, and cultural studies; an ability to think and write critically about fashion and fashion media, in terms of aesthetics, historical development, and cultural context; confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays; and proficiency in various aspects of project-based work, including identifying a research topic, building arguments, using evidence, and working with and appropriately citing a variety of sources.

Requisite: At least one 200-level foundations course in English, Film & Media Studies, Art & the History of Art, History, Theater and Dance, and/or Sexuality, Women’s & Gender Studies. Upper-level coursework in one or more of these fields is strongly recommended. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Timothy J. Van Compernolle, Sara J. Brenneis

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
EUST-327-01-2122S
tvancompernolle@amherst.edu sbrenneis@amherst.edu
ASLC-327-01, FAMS-327-01, EUST-327-01

(Offered as ASLC 327, EUST 327, and FAMS 327) The relationships among media, the state, and civil society are complex.  This course aims to address these relationships by examining cinema—the art form of the twentieth century—in Japan and Spain during different but overlapping eras of tumult: the 1930s to the 1980s. Putting these two national cinemas in a comparative framework will allow us to address issues such as: the interest in film by authoritarian regimes; the way cinema is harnessed to wartime goals by the state; the nature of censorship and self-censorship in war and peace; the potential of image, sound, and narrative to give expression to propaganda and democratic ideals; the cathartic release following the end of an authoritarian regime or occupation. The course, taught in English, does not assume prior knowledge of either country, nor of film studies. All films have English subtitles.

Spring semester. Professors Brenneis and Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
EUST-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua M. Guilford

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM; M 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-210-01-2122S
jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-280-01, FAMS-210-01

(Offered as ENGL 280 and FAMS 210) An introduction to cinema studies through consideration of key critical terms, together with a selection of various films (classic and contemporary, foreign and American, popular and avant-garde) for illustration and discussion. The terms for discussion may include, among others: modernity, montage, realism, visual pleasure, ethnography, choreography, streaming, and consumption. Two class meetings and one screening per week.

Limited to 35 students. Spring semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Pooja G. Rangan

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-216-01-2122S
prangan@amherst.edu
ENGL-284-01, FAMS-216-01

(Offered as ENGL 284 and FAMS 216) What do we mean when we talk about “the media”? Coming to Terms: Media will parse this question, approaching the media not as a shadowy monolith but as a complex and changing environment comprised of varied technologies, formats, practices, devices, and platforms (e.g.: photography, gramophone records, online dating, smartphones, Netflix). The course will introduce key terms and critical approaches for the study of modern media in their specificity in an era of digital mediation. We will ask questions such as: What are the formal and technical features of different media? How do they construct us as spectators or users, and shape our perception of the world we inhabit? How do our media practices produce experiences of space, time, and community? And crucially, what are the ideological impacts of these perceptions, constructions, and practices when it comes to race, sex, identity, and the circulation of power and capital?

Each week students will encounter important works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century media and cultural theory and will encounter concrete examples to flesh out the abstract concepts in the readings and engage in ample class participation. Assignments will encourage students to enter into a conversation with these texts as a way of exploring and constructing arguments about contemporary media. The course will provide a strong foundation for advanced work in film and media studies, and related disciplines.

This course has no prerequisites, but it is best suited to students who have completed a 100-level course dealing with the analysis of literature or film. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Rangan.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

The Department

TTH 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-221-01-2122S
tdepartment@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-01, FAMS-221-01

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeffers L. Engelhardt

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-312-01-2122S
jengelhardt@amherst.edu
MUSI-238-01, FAMS-312-01, ANTH-239-01

(Offered as MUSI 238, ANTH 239 and FAMS 312) This course is about exploring, participating in, and documenting the musical communities and acoustic terrain of the Connecticut River Valley. The first part of the course will focus on local histories and music scenes, ethnographic methods and technologies, and different techniques of documentary representation. The second part of the course will involve intensive, sustained engagement with musicians and sounds in the Amherst vicinity (and beyond). Course participants will give weekly updates about their fieldwork projects and are expected to become well-versed in the musics they are studying. There will be a significant amount of work and travel outside of class meetings. The course will culminate in contributions to a web-based documentary archive of soundscapes projects. We will also benefit from visits and interaction with local musicians. Two class meetings per week. Visit http://www.valleysoundscapes.org/ for more information.

Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Engelhardt.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Timothy J. Van Compernolle, Sara J. Brenneis

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-327-01-2122S
tvancompernolle@amherst.edu sbrenneis@amherst.edu
ASLC-327-01, FAMS-327-01, EUST-327-01

(Offered as ASLC 327, EUST 327, and FAMS 327) The relationships among media, the state, and civil society are complex.  This course aims to address these relationships by examining cinema—the art form of the twentieth century—in Japan and Spain during different but overlapping eras of tumult: the 1930s to the 1980s. Putting these two national cinemas in a comparative framework will allow us to address issues such as: the interest in film by authoritarian regimes; the way cinema is harnessed to wartime goals by the state; the nature of censorship and self-censorship in war and peace; the potential of image, sound, and narrative to give expression to propaganda and democratic ideals; the cathartic release following the end of an authoritarian regime or occupation. The course, taught in English, does not assume prior knowledge of either country, nor of film studies. All films have English subtitles.

Spring semester. Professors Brenneis and Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adam R. Levine

MW 01:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-335-01-2122S
alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-335-01, FAMS-335-01

(Offered as ARHA 335 and FAMS 335) This intermediate production course surveys the outer limits of cinematic expression and provides an overview of creative 16mm film production. We will begin by making cameraless projects through drawing, painting and scratching directly onto the film strip before further exploring the fundamentals of 16mm technology, including cameras, editing and hand-processing. While remaining aware of our creative choices, we will invite chance into our process and risk failure, as every experiment inevitably must.

Through screenings of original film prints, assigned readings and discussion, the course will consider a number of experimental filmmakers and then conclude with a review of exhibition and distribution strategies for moving image art. All students will complete a number of short assignments on film and one final project on either film or video, each of which is to be presented for class critique. One three-hour class and one film screening per week.

Requisite: One 200-level production course or relevant experience (to be discussed with the instructor in advance of the first class). Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Levine.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua M. Guilford

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM; SU 04:00 PM-07:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-360-01-2122S
jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-383-01, FAMS-360-01

(Offered as ENGL 383 and FAMS 360] What’s intimate about cinema? And what, if anything, is cinematic about intimacy? Since its invention, cinema has been closely associated with intimate experience, though understandings of this association have shifted over time. For classical film theorists, cinema’s intimate devices (the close-up, the kiss, etc.) were often invested with revolutionary potential, though more recent cultural theorists have issued strong rejoinders to such claims. Isn’t intimacy crucial to the workings of modern power? Doesn’t cinema structure intimate relations in accordance with normative ideologies? Examining a range of intimate film cultures–from early cinema to surrealism, classical Hollywood, Black British film, and queer world cinema–this course will explore the intimate dimensions of filmic representation and reception, and the reasons cinema’s intimacy has been both celebrated and denounced. Assignments include in-class presentations, critical essays, and weekly entries in personal film journals.

Requisite: One 200-level ENGL or FAMS course, or consent of the instructor. Not open to first-year students. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Lise Shapiro Sanders

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM; SU 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-374-01-2122S
lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-374-01, FAMS-374-01

(Offered as ENGL 374 and FAMS 374) Gothic fictions are known for their ability to send shivers down the spine, evoking sensations of discomfort, fear, and horror. This interdisciplinary course will explore the genre of the Gothic from its roots in the late eighteenth century through the present, moving among literature, film, television, and digital media forms. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein will be a key text; we will explore intermedial texts like Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Bram Stoker’s Dracula; and the course will end with twenty-first century incarnations of the Gothic (Get Out, Penny Dreadful). Throughout, we will discuss the tangled relationship between sexuality, race, and power that characterizes the genre. Students will  develop a creative project, whether a piece of short fiction or a visual/digital exploration of Gothic themes, keep a weekly reading/viewing journal of their responses to the assigned texts, and facilitate discussion on a given text. In addition, students will write a 3- to 5-page close textual analysis, with a mandatory peer review workshop and revision, and a final research paper (10-12 pages) or creative project. Students will gain a familiarity with key literary and film/media studies terms and approaches; an understanding of major works in the Gothic and horror genres; an ability to think and write critically about Gothic literature and related media, in terms of aesthetics, historical development, and cultural context; confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays in literary studies, cultural studies, and film and media studies; and proficiency in various aspects of project-based work, including identifying a research topic, building arguments, using evidence, and working with and appropriately citing a variety of sources.

Requisite: A 200-level foundations course in English or Film & Media Studies, or equivalent. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-380-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Pooja G. Rangan

MW 08:30 AM-09:50 AM; T 07:00 PM-10:00 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-382-01-2122S
prangan@amherst.edu
ENGL-378-01, FAMS-382-01

(Offered as ENGL 378 and FAMS 382)

Calls to defund the police may have helped to cancel the notorious reality program COPS, but crime scenes, courtrooms, cops, lawyers, victims, and vigilantes dominate our media and our imaginations. This course asks what needs to be abolished—not just canceled—in our media environment in order for us to imagine a world without prisons. Abolition is, at its core, a transformative project that aims to change the very social relations, conditions, and logics that produce the harms for which police and prisons seem to serve as solutions. A project that once took on the seemingly impossible challenge of ending slavery, abolition has become a movement of interlinked struggles against systemic oppression. We will examine a range of media, historical and contemporary, cinematic and televisual, fictional and documentary, global and local, through the lens of abolition, deconstructing carceral scenarios and affects, and discovering and imagining transformative approaches to narrative, healing, and justice. Students enrolling in this course should be prepared to take on a range of activities including and beyond weekly readings, film/media viewing, and analytical writing, such as independent and collaborative research, site-based field work (if public health guidelines permit), and optional creative media assignments.

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and to first-year students with consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Rangan.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adam R. Levine

MW 09:00 AM-11:00 AM

Amherst College
FAMS-412-01-2122S
alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-444-01, FAMS-412-01

(Offered as ARHA 444 and FAMS 412) Essay filmmaking is a dynamic form with many commonly cited attributes—the presence of an authorial voice, an emphasis on broad themes, an eclectic approach to genre, and the tendency to digress or draw unexpected connections. Yet, true to its nature, the precise definition of the essay film is in constant flux. It can be both personal and political, individual and collective, noble and mischievous. Essay filmmakers themselves are equally diverse, ranging from established film auteurs to Third Cinema activists and contemporary video artists.

If we entertain the notion that the processes of cinema closely resemble the mechanics of human thought, then the essay film may be the medium’s purest expression. To watch or make such a film, we must give ourselves over to a compulsive, restless energy that delights in chasing a subject down any number of rabbit holes and blind alleys, often stopping to admire the scenery on the way. As with thought, there is no end product, no clear boundaries, no goal but the activity itself.

The term "essay" finds its origins in the French essayer, meaning “to attempt” or to try.” In this advanced production workshop, we will read, screen and discuss examples of the essayistic mode in literature and cinema while making several such attempts of our own. Students will complete a series of writing assignments and video projects informed by class materials and group discussion.

Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Levine.

Requisite: One 200-level production course or relevant experience (to be discussed with the instructor in advance of the first class). 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lise Shapiro Sanders

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
FAMS-431-01-2122S
lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-475-01, FAMS-431-01

(Offered as ENGL 475 and FAMS 431) Fashion has long been associated with frivolity, ephemerality, and triviality. Yet trends in clothing and design are irrevocably linked to politics, technology, society, and cultural change–from hats to hemlines to heels, fashion can reveal the transformations of an era. How has fashion evolved in the modern age, and what is its relationship to literature, film, and other media forms? What can fashion teach us about our past, present, and future? This advanced seminar will delve into the interdisciplinary field of fashion studies to examine the vicissitudes of fashion from the nineteenth century onward, focusing on Britain, Europe, and the United States, with an eye toward the role of imperialism, Orientalism, and cultural appropriation in shaping fashion’s tangled histories. Students will study literary texts; film and television; print, visual, and digital media; and material culture. Potential case studies include the dandy, the New Woman, and the flapper; wartime fashions; subcultural style; the wedding gown; the sneaker; among other topics. Students will do independent research, culminating in a written research project and/or curated digital exhibit; keep a weekly reading/viewing journal recording their critical responses to the assigned texts; and facilitate discussion on a given topic. Students can expect to gain: a familiarity with key terms and approaches in fashion studies, media studies, and cultural studies; an ability to think and write critically about fashion and fashion media, in terms of aesthetics, historical development, and cultural context; confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays; and proficiency in various aspects of project-based work, including identifying a research topic, building arguments, using evidence, and working with and appropriately citing a variety of sources.

Requisite: At least one 200-level foundations course in English, Film & Media Studies, Art & the History of Art, History, Theater and Dance, and/or Sexuality, Women’s & Gender Studies. Upper-level coursework in one or more of these fields is strongly recommended. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Heidi Gilpin

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
GERM-368-01-2122S
hgilpin@amherst.edu
GERM-368-01, ARCH-368-01, EUST-368-01, FAMS-380-01

(Offered as GERM 368, ARCH 368, EUST 368, and FAMS 380) This research seminar will explore conceptions of space as they have informed and influenced thought and creativity in the fields of cultural studies, literature, architecture, urban studies, performance, and the visual, electronic, and time-based arts. Students will select and pursue a major semester-long research project early in the semester in consultation with the professor, and present their research in its various stages of development throughout the semester, in a variety of media formats (writing, performance, video, electronic art/interactive media, installation, online and networked events, architectural/design drawings/renderings), along with oral presentations of readings and other materials. Readings and visual materials will be drawn from the fields of literature and philosophy; architectural, art, and film theory and history; performance studies and performance theory; and theories of technology and the natural and built environment. Emphasis on developing research, writing, and presentation skills is a core of this seminar.

Preference given to German majors and European Studies majors, as well as to students interested in architecture/design, performance, film/video, interactive installation, and/or the environment. Conducted in English. German majors will select a research project focused on a German Studies context, and will do a substantial portion of the readings in German. 

Limited to 18 students. Enrollment requires attendance at the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Gilpin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeffers L. Engelhardt

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
MUSI-238-01-2122S
jengelhardt@amherst.edu
MUSI-238-01, FAMS-312-01, ANTH-239-01

(Offered as MUSI 238, ANTH 239 and FAMS 312) This course is about exploring, participating in, and documenting the musical communities and acoustic terrain of the Connecticut River Valley. The first part of the course will focus on local histories and music scenes, ethnographic methods and technologies, and different techniques of documentary representation. The second part of the course will involve intensive, sustained engagement with musicians and sounds in the Amherst vicinity (and beyond). Course participants will give weekly updates about their fieldwork projects and are expected to become well-versed in the musics they are studying. There will be a significant amount of work and travel outside of class meetings. The course will culminate in contributions to a web-based documentary archive of soundscapes projects. We will also benefit from visits and interaction with local musicians. Two class meetings per week. Visit http://www.valleysoundscapes.org/ for more information.

Limited to 12 students. Spring semester. Professor Engelhardt.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Abraham Ravett

01:00PM-03:50PM M;07:00PM-09:00PM W

Hampshire College
334560

Jerome Liebling Center 131;Jerome Liebling Center 131

arPF@hampshire.edu
"Certain people start with a documentary and arrive at fiction...others start with fiction and arrive at the documentary."-Jean Luc Godard This is an introductory course for students who would like to develop their interest in documentary practice. Through a combination of screenings, lectures, readings, and technical workshops, we will explore a critical/historical overview of this genre and incorporate our knowledge and experience to produce individual or collaborative projects in a variety of "modes of representation." Projects need not be restricted to a particular medium; in fact, students will be encouraged to explore the ways in which film, video, and/or animation can be utilized together. Wednesday evening screening films will be viewed via Hampflix. Keywords: documentary, filmmaking, digital, video
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Patricia Montoya

09:00AM-11:50AM W;06:00PM-08:00PM TU;06:00PM-08:00PM TU

Hampshire College
334563

Jerome Liebling Center 120;Jerome Liebling Center 120;Harold Johnson Library B2

pmHA@hampshire.edu
Video, still images, and sound are used in this course to explore the fundamental character of storytelling, filmmaking, and time-based art practices. Students perform all aspects of production with particular attention to developing ideas and building analytical and critical skills. Through exercises that include in-class and weekly projects, students will produce sketches aimed at exploring video as an experimentation tool and review the history of video art to give students the basic theoretical tools to critique their own productions and develop an understanding of the possibilities that the medium offers. There will be special emphasis paid to sound design that includes original music and ambient sound gathered with a separate sound recorder.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Eva Rueschmann

10:30AM-11:50AM TU;10:30AM-11:50AM TH

Hampshire College
334568

Franklin Patterson Hall 103;Franklin Patterson Hall 103

erHA@hampshire.edu
From the Australian Film Revival in the 1970s represented by directors such as Peter Weir, Fred Schepisi and Gillian Armstrong to "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "Rabbit-Proof Fence," "The Piano," "Mystery Road" and "Mad Max: Fury Road," Australian and New Zealand have made unique contributions to international cinema. In this course, we will examine the ways in which selected films from both countries engage with genre film, national identity, race and gender, history, myth, landscape, and the ability of two small film cultures to thrive despite the economic and cultural dominance of Hollywood. Our weekly film screenings will be supplemented by a discussion of short stories and a novel in order to situate Australian and New Zealand cinema within a broader cultural and historical framework. This course is part of the Time and Narrative Learning Collaborative (LC). Some of the questions we will explore are: How does film narrate national history, heritage, and myth? How do Australian and New Zealand films address the colonial legacy of these two settler nations, and shape postcolonial responses to that legacy? Keywords: Australian film, New Zealand film, national identity, history, cultural studies
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Eva Rueschmann

02:30PM-03:50PM TU;02:30PM-03:50PM TH;07:00PM-10:00PM M

Hampshire College
334577

Franklin Patterson Hall 103;Franklin Patterson Hall 103;Franklin Patterson Hall WLH

erHA@hampshire.edu
Cinema travels through time much as the human memory can, reliving moments in various times with "limitless possibilities," wrote Marxist philosopher and literary historian Gyorgy Lukacs. In this seminar, we will explore the ways in which global films engage with and can manipulate time and memory, both thematically and in terms of its aesthetic devices and different genre forms. We will examine how cinema as a time-based medium addresses nostalgia, trauma, dreams, and amnesia on both an individual and collective level. Drawing on historically and autobiographically inspired feature films, science fiction, coming-of-age stories, and other genres, we will discuss cinema's ability to mythologize, memorialize and critically reflect on the past as a space of socio-historical change, addressing class, race and gender roles, family dynamics, war, politics, and other themes. Possible films include Hiroshima, Mon Amour; La Jetee; A Very Long Engagement; Atonement; The Lives of Others; Volver; Au Revoir Les Enfants; Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind; Moonlight; Cinema Paradiso; Atlantics; and others. Keywords: Film studies, time, memory studies, history, trauma
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ajay Sinha

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
116340
asinha@mtholyoke.edu
116340,117106
"Indian popular cinema, known commonly as Bollywood, is usually understood to have weak storylines, interrupted by overblown spectacles and distracting dance numbers. The course explores the narrative structure of Bollywood as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a "constellation of interruptions". We will learn to see Bollywood historically, as a cultural form that brings India's visual and performative traditions into a unique cinematic configuration. We will analyze a selection of feature films, read scholarly articles, participate in debates, write guided assignments, and pursue independent research papers in order to understand Bollywood's uniqueness in relation to world cinema."
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bernadine Mellis

T 10:00AM-12:50PM

Mount Holyoke College
117183

Art 222

bmellis@mtholyoke.edu
117184,117182,117183
This is a space where students can explore their own creative impulses, develop ideas, and generate material. Here, we will stretch beyond the boundaries of any particular creative practice as it may be defined within disciplinary limits. We will engage in contemplative practices while using writing, movement, theater games, and time-based media in order to germinate seeds for projects -- projects we might explore further and possibly complete either within or beyond the bounds of the class itself. More importantly, we will begin to identify our own inner rhythms as makers, create patterns that support our creative process, and develop the capacity to listen deeply to what speaks to us. We will turn to makers and writers of all kinds for inspiration and guidance as we develop a vocabulary for process, including but not limited to: Judi Bari, Lynda Barry, CA Conrad, Louise Erdrich, Jozen Tamori Gibson, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Bernadette Mayer, Dori Midnight, Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono & Rainer Maria Rilke.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bernadine Mellis

T 10:00AM-12:50PM

Mount Holyoke College
117182

Art 222

bmellis@mtholyoke.edu
117184,117182,117183
This is a space where students can explore their own creative impulses, develop ideas, and generate material. Here, we will stretch beyond the boundaries of any particular creative practice as it may be defined within disciplinary limits. We will engage in contemplative practices while using writing, movement, theater games, and time-based media in order to germinate seeds for projects -- projects we might explore further and possibly complete either within or beyond the bounds of the class itself. More importantly, we will begin to identify our own inner rhythms as makers, create patterns that support our creative process, and develop the capacity to listen deeply to what speaks to us. We will turn to makers and writers of all kinds for inspiration and guidance as we develop a vocabulary for process, including but not limited to: Judi Bari, Lynda Barry, CA Conrad, Louise Erdrich, Jozen Tamori Gibson, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Bernadette Mayer, Dori Midnight, Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono & Rainer Maria Rilke.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amy Rodgers

W 01:30PM-04:20PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
116650
arodgers@mtholyoke.edu
116575,116650
Film critics Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott contend that "movies may bemale dominated, but images of men are surprisingly narrow." This course both explores various constructs of postmodern American masculinity as they are portrayed and disseminated through contemporary film, and seeks to understand some of what is at stake (culturally, ideologically, economically) in perpetuating certain cinematic archetypes. Of particular relevance to our investigation are the ways in which film yokes masculinity to race, gender, and class. Films include Full Metal Jacket, No Country for Old Men, The Big Lebowski, Boyz in the Hood, Paris is Burning, Fight Club, and Moonlight.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elizabeth Young

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116652
eyoung@mtholyoke.edu
116652,116574
This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bianka Ballina

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116553
bballina@mtholyoke.edu
This course introduces students to the critical study of media, focusing on electronic media, digital technologies, and network cultures. We will analyze the aesthetics, politics, protocols, history, and theory of media, paying attention to the ways they create and erase borders; affect how we form and articulate identities; invade privacy while providing a platform for exploration; foster hate speech and progressive movements alike; and participate in capitalist economies and the acceleration of climate change. While tracing the global flows of media creation, distribution, and consumption, we will also consider the different issues that arise in diverse national and local contexts.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ajay Sinha

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
117106
asinha@mtholyoke.edu
116340,117106
"Indian popular cinema, known commonly as Bollywood, is usually understood to have weak storylines, interrupted by overblown spectacles and distracting dance numbers. The course explores the narrative structure of Bollywood as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a "constellation of interruptions". We will learn to see Bollywood historically, as a cultural form that brings India's visual and performative traditions into a unique cinematic configuration. We will analyze a selection of feature films, read scholarly articles, participate in debates, write guided assignments, and pursue independent research papers in order to understand Bollywood's uniqueness in relation to world cinema."
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bernadine Mellis

T 10:00AM-12:50PM

Mount Holyoke College
117184

Art 222

bmellis@mtholyoke.edu
117184,117182,117183
This is a space where students can explore their own creative impulses, develop ideas, and generate material. Here, we will stretch beyond the boundaries of any particular creative practice as it may be defined within disciplinary limits. We will engage in contemplative practices while using writing, movement, theater games, and time-based media in order to germinate seeds for projects -- projects we might explore further and possibly complete either within or beyond the bounds of the class itself. More importantly, we will begin to identify our own inner rhythms as makers, create patterns that support our creative process, and develop the capacity to listen deeply to what speaks to us. We will turn to makers and writers of all kinds for inspiration and guidance as we develop a vocabulary for process, including but not limited to: Judi Bari, Lynda Barry, CA Conrad, Louise Erdrich, Jozen Tamori Gibson, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Bernadette Mayer, Dori Midnight, Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono and Rainer Maria Rilke.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amy Rodgers

W 01:30PM-04:20PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
116575
arodgers@mtholyoke.edu
116575,116650
Film critics Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott contend that "movies may bemale dominated, but images of men are surprisingly narrow." This course both explores various constructs of postmodern American masculinity as they are portrayed and disseminated through contemporary film, and seeks to understand some of what is at stake (culturally, ideologically, economically) in perpetuating certain cinematic archetypes. Of particular relevance to our investigation are the ways in which film yokes masculinity to race, gender, and class. Films include Full Metal Jacket, No Country for Old Men, The Big Lebowski, Boyz in the Hood, Paris is Burning, Fight Club, and Moonlight.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elizabeth Young

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116574
eyoung@mtholyoke.edu
116652,116574
This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bernadine Mellis

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116566

Art 222

bmellis@mtholyoke.edu
This is a projects-based course, taught by faculty in film/video production, theater, and media, which builds towards a final presentation of one large-scale project involving all members of the class. The course will draw on and build skills students have developed in their respective foci in the FMT major. For example, students might create a film in multiple parts, a multi-media performance which could include live performance, projected image, and interactive sound, or a hybrid play with projected images. Students collaborate with faculty on every phase of the project from pre-production -- including dramaturgy, directing, acting, production management, and scenic, lighting, sound, and video design -- to post-production.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elliot Montague

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116561

Art 222

emontagu@mtholyoke.edu
Intended for advanced film/video production students, this course will focus on the cinematic directorial skills needed for a successful collaboration with actors. Through discussions, exercises, film director workshops and audition/casting sessions, students will cast, rehearse and shoot short scenes (both original and adapted) from an array of cinematic genres. We will build upon our skills of script and character analysis and creating dramatic conflict. Though we will be collaborating with theater student actors, all students in the class will be expected to direct as well as act.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Elliot Montague

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116559

Art 222

emontagu@mtholyoke.edu
Intended for advanced Film, Media, Theater students, this course will explore fictional narrative filmmaking through a rigorous script-to-screen process. Students will write, shoot and edit a short fictional narrative film in small groups. In addition to weekly screenings of short and feature narrative films, the class will consist of lectures on advanced narrative filmmaking techniques, working with actors, film discussions, script readings and critiques of footage and various cuts.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

JENNIFER CHANG CRANDALL

W 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
ENG-291us-01-202203
jcrandall@smith.edu
This workshop will focus on how creators can connect more profoundly with an audience by thinking of themselves as conduits for stories that need to be told. We’ll spend time and energy noticing and observing the world around us. You’ll be challenged to earn high levels of trust and partnership from the
people in your stories. And we’ll examine how your subjects, and your audience, can be co-authors in your creative process. You’ll be welcome to choose text, visuals, audio or multimedia to complete your assignments. Throughout the workshop you’ll also learn to use serendipity, risk, meditation, and mystery as powerful tools for building narrative experiences. Admission by permission of the instructor, based on a brief application.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sebnem Baran

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
FMS-232-01-202203
sbaran@smith.edu
While the #TimesUp and #MeToo movements have recently brought the problems of sexism, misogyny and the lack of representation to the forefront, the U.S. television industry has long struggled with providing space to women on and behind the screen. Despite the attempts to confine them in the roles ascribed by patriarchal society, women have challenged norms and changed television at the same time. This course explores the history of American television to understand how “unruly women” transformed television by challenging hierarchies of power. Not open to students who have take FYS 135.(E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Sebnem Baran

W 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-232-F01-202203
sbaran@smith.edu
While the #TimesUp and #MeToo movements have recently brought the problems of sexism, misogyny and the lack of representation to the forefront, the U.S. television industry has long struggled with providing space to women on and behind the screen. Despite the attempts to confine them in the roles ascribed by patriarchal society, women have challenged norms and changed television at the same time. This course explores the history of American television to understand how “unruly women” transformed television by challenging hierarchies of power. Not open to students who have taken FYS 135. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

M W 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Smith College
FMS-242-01-202203
jmalkows@smith.edu
Pop Docs examines how documentary techniques that originated in art house and experimental film have migrated into mainstream entertainment media. We’ll study popular forms of non-fiction media: true crime streaming series and podcasts, reality TV, YouTube vlogs, and other social media content. In doing so, we’ll ask: what core tenets of documentary work do these forms discard and retain? How do these evolutions impact the ethics of recording real people and their lives? Why are audiences drawn to “reality” content, and how savvy are they about the distance between what appears on screen and the lived experience of those recorded? Prerequisites: FMS 150 or 237.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sebnem Baran

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
FMS-251-01-202203
sbaran@smith.edu
Television has long been associated with domestic--both in terms of home and the nation--consumption. However, digital technologies have challenged this confinement. Following the lead of satellite technologies and the global wave of economic liberalization, television content has become more mobile, and spread of digital technologies has further contributed to this mobility. This course examines the global journey of television starting from its conception and ending in the current digital era. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Sebnem Baran

M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-251-F01-202203
sbaran@smith.edu
Television has long been associated with domestic--both in terms of home and the nation--consumption. However, digital technologies have challenged this confinement. Following the lead of satellite technologies and the global wave of economic liberalization, television content has become more mobile, and spread of digital technologies has further contributed to this mobility. This course examines the global journey of television starting from its conception and ending in the current digital era. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

PATRICIA MONTOYA

F 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
FMS-280-01-202203

Hillyer 320

pmontoya@smith.edu
This course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: development of a viable story idea or concept, aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video, the role of sound and successful audio recording, and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing. You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. Along with projects and screenings, there will be reading assignments and writing exercises. Prerequisite: FMS 150 or its equivalent (can be taken concurrently). Application and permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 12.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

PATRICIA MONTOYA

M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-280-F01-202203
pmontoya@smith.edu
This course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: development of a viable story idea or concept, aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video, the role of sound and successful audio recording, and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing. You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. Along with projects and screenings, there will be reading assignments and writing exercises. Prerequisite: FMS 150 or its equivalent (can be taken concurrently). Application and permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 12.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

PATRICIA MONTOYA

F 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-282ap-01-202203

Hillyer 320

pmontoya@smith.edu
Through conventional filmmaking aesthetics and techniques, this advanced course includes hands-on trainings and workshops geared toward creating a feature-length project. Developing a long-form narrative, experimental, documentary, or episodic project, students write thirty pages of a full-length screenplay, while also producing, directing, and editing a ten-minute sample clip. This course features DSLR digital video production, lighting and sound exercises, editing techniques, and various distribution strategies. Prerequisites: FMS 150 & 280 or ARS 162. Instructor permission and special application required.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

PATRICIA MONTOYA

TH 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-282ap-F01-202203
pmontoya@smith.edu
Through conventional filmmaking aesthetics and techniques, this advanced course includes hands-on trainings and workshops geared toward creating a feature-length project. Developing a long-form narrative, experimental, documentary, or episodic project, students write thirty pages of a full-length screenplay, while also producing, directing, and editing a ten-minute sample clip. This course features DSLR digital video production, lighting and sound exercises, editing techniques, and various distribution strategies. Prerequisites: FMS 150 & 280 or ARS 162. Instructor permission and special application required
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alexandra Linden Miller Keller

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
FMS-290-01-202203
akeller@smith.edu
This course is designed to give FMS majors and minors a solid grounding in the primary methods of our field. In other words, what are the broad approaches scholars have taken to the study of media, and what specific methodological strategies have proved most effective? We begin with theory as one such method--one that zooms out to ask broad questions about the essential nature of a medium. Our history unit shifts the focus to how media are impacted by and implicated in the progression of time and culture. Finally, our criticism unit features strategies for analyzing individual media objects. Prerequisite: FMS 150. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor permission only. Priority given to FMS majors and minors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

W 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-345-01-202203
jmalkows@smith.edu
If cinema is, as André Bazin writes, "change mummified," violence and death are among the most dramatic physical changes it can "mummify." This course studies the long, complex relationship between cinema and these bodily spectacles. How has censorship impacted the way violence has been screened? How can cameras make the internal processes of death externally visible? What are the ethics of filming "real" violence and death in a documentary mode? How are cultural attitudes toward violence and death reflected in and shaped by films? As a cautionary note, this course necessarily includes graphic representations of violence and death. Prerequisites: FMS 150. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

TU 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-345-F01-202203

Seelye 201

jmalkows@smith.edu
If cinema is, as André Bazin writes, "change mummified," violence and death are among the most dramatic physical changes it can "mummify." This course studies the long, complex relationship between cinema and these bodily spectacles. How has censorship impacted the way violence has been screened? How can cameras make the internal processes of death externally visible? What are the ethics of filming "real" violence and death in a documentary mode? How are cultural attitudes toward violence and death reflected in and shaped by films? As a cautionary note, this course necessarily includes graphic representations of violence and death. Prerequisites: FMS 150. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kevin Anderson

M 11:15AM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
38325

Integ. Learning Center S350

kta@umass.edu
38289
This course explores the relationship between music and the moving image across multiple forms of media, including Film and Television, Documentaries, Music Videos, Video Games, Commercials, Broadcasts (e.g. news, sports), and Social Media (e.g. TikTok). The scope of the material studied includes examples from multiple cultures and points in the history of the moving image, paying particular attention to hybrid and cross-cultural blends of image and music, and the ways in which this marriage of image and sound service cultural and emotional meanings. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of international, cultural, and historic pairings of music with moving images, and will emerge from the course with a thorough foundation in the following: how and why music pairs with the moving image; how and why the relationship between music and images has varied across time and culture; and the ways in which psychological states, cultural-historical markers, and emotional appeal are targeted through the pairing of sonic and visual stimuli. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Patrick Mensah

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
29488

Integ. Learning Center S240

pmensah@frital.umass.edu
29973
This course will explore themes of the Southern Gothic in works of Cinema and popular Televisual narratives. We will study the development of the lurid motifs of the Gothic that works affiliated with this genre often deploy to invoke a sense of horror and dread, moral corruption, and psychological abjection, all seemingly meant to assimilate the South and its citizens to the category of a degenerate and menacing otherness. The imagery of dismal landscapes, dark swamps, decaying architecture, fanatical and occult religious practices, and the often grotesque or monstrous figures and cultural tropes that aspire to associate the South with an imaginary medieval past, will be examined mostly as marks of an ambivalent ideological struggle surrounding the self-identity of America. Thanks to this regime of gothic tropes and insignia, America, on the one hand, heralds its own self-identity as culturally rich and historically continuous, and yet, it is, at least partly thanks to this same regimen of gothic tropes (understood as figures of otherness), on the other hand, that America also typically (or stereotypically) deals with anxieties arising from its attempts to define its own modern identity, and its identity as modern and exceptional. Such anxieties give rise to instances of negative stereotyping, and practices of cultural exclusion that the course critically interrogates. We also study several important ways in which the Gothic serves as an important voice for the marginalized, while enabling critical reflections on the social and cultural practices of exclusion we have alluded to. The history of slavery, the civil war, and its aftermath, as well as literature produced by certain Southern writers (such as William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, Eudora Welty, Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, Katherine Anne Porter, and others) since the late 19th century, will be identified as important defining contexts of emergence for the Southern gothic, and as the indispensable conditions that have made its deployment into 20th century film and television possible. Due attention will also be paid to the influence of French colonial adventures and interventions in shaping cultures and "gothic" mythologies of the American South, and the Caribbean, as well as the role played by America's own efforts to secure and maintain hegemonic influences on the region. The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen. Ed. AT, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Laura McGough

W 7:30PM 10:30PM

UMass Amherst
29495

School of Management 137

lmcgough@umass.edu
Join the audience of students, faculty, and area community at the annual Massachusetts Multicultural Film Festival with films and directors from around the world introduced by leading scholars and filmmakers. This season's theme, "Imagine Better," gathers films from around the world with creative, often startlingly original visions for the future, works that rethink approaches to myriad environmental and cultural challenges, and films that imagine alternatives to familiar patterns of thinking and being. The first and longest-running University-based film festival of its kind, the MMFF brings the best of new fiction, documentary and experimental filmmaking by international filmmakers and seeks to cultivate an appreciation of film and moving image media, to inspire audiences to a deeper understanding of the world's cultures through film, and to celebrate past, present and future achievements of international filmmaking in a university setting. You will attend festival screenings and participate in online discussions with other students about what most interested, inspired, surprised you about the filmmakers, filmmaking, and the subject matter of works programed in this season's festival.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Patrick Mensah

TU 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
29489

Integ. Learning Center S231

pmensah@frital.umass.edu
29963
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
29498

Herter Hall room 209

29964
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
29499

Herter Hall room 209

29965
This course offers an introduction to African film as an aesthetic and cultural practice. Students should expect to be familiarized with the key ideas and objectives that have inspired and driven that practice since the early 1960s, and be furnished with the technical tools and methodological skills that would permit them to understand, analyze, and think critically about the artistic and thematic aspects of the films that are screened. They should also expect the course to provide them with a critical peek into several cardinal issues of social and cultural relevance in contemporary Africa and its history. Issues of interest typically include, the nationstate and its declining status, imperatives of decolonization, economic dependency and structural adjustment programs, orality and changing traditional cultures, diasporic migrations, urbanization and its problems, gender relations, civil wars, child soldiers, gangs, and related themes. Filmmakers studied include, but are not limited to, Abderrahmane Sissako, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ousmane Sembene, Raoul Peck, Jean-Marie Teno, Dani Kouyate, Mweze Ngangura, Gavin Hood, Neill Blomkamp, Moufida Tlatli, Djibril Diop Mambety (please note that this list is subject to change, and shall be updated as future changes are made). The course is conducted in English, and requires no prior knowledge of the field. All films are streamed to your computer from the UMass library on demand. Required readings are provided online, and no book purchases are necessary. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kevin Anderson

M 11:15AM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
38289

Integ. Learning Center S350

kta@umass.edu
38325
This course explores the relationship between music and the moving image across multiple forms of media, including Film and Television, Documentaries, Music Videos, Video Games, Commercials, Broadcasts (e.g. news, sports), and Social Media (e.g. TikTok). The scope of the material studied includes examples from multiple cultures and points in the history of the moving image, paying particular attention to hybrid and cross-cultural blends of image and music, and the ways in which this marriage of image and sound service cultural and emotional meanings. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of international, cultural, and historic pairings of music with moving images, and will emerge from the course with a thorough foundation in the following: how and why music pairs with the moving image; how and why the relationship between music and images has varied across time and culture; and the ways in which psychological states, cultural-historical markers, and emotional appeal are targeted through the pairing of sonic and visual stimuli. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Don Levine

M 4:00PM 7:30PM

UMass Amherst
29481

Herter Hall room 227

delevine@llc.umass.edu
27773
Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new." Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Van Sant), The American Soldier ( Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA

TU 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
29482

Herter Hall room 110

27774
Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new." Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Van Sant), The American Soldier ( Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB

TU 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
29483

Herter Hall room 110

27775
Explores modern origin of film experimentation in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely modern of the media, we'll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, dreamlike and fantastic, 2) the factual, realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus, we'll attempt to discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always "make it new." Films and filmmakers such as Breathless (Godard), My Own Private Idaho (Van Sant), The American Soldier ( Fassbinder), others. Requirements: one 5-page paper for midterm, ten-page final paper or project; attendance. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Don Levine

W 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
37982

Herter Hall room 227

delevine@llc.umass.edu
27768,29480,38326

01
3.00

Daniel Pope

M 4:00PM 7:00PM

UMass Amherst
36710

Integ. Lrng Center S404

daniel@umass.edu
What insights do films with end-of-the-world scenarios, dystopian futures, and post-apocalyptic themes offer into the cultural moment that produces them? From alien invasions and planetary collisions to cataclysmic war and totalitarian dystopias, from the zombie apocalypse and the rise of machines, to human extinction and the end of civilization, what do these films tell us about contemporary realities? How do they speak to our anxieties and fears about the future as well as our hopes and aspirations? In what ways do these films pose and explore questions of the "human"? End-of-the-world films often intersect with other genres (thriller, action film, neo-noir, comedy, art-house, romance, drama, experimental, etc.) In this course we will study the cinema of eschatology, of ultimate endings, and analyze a range of filmic approaches to the philosophical, psychological, and aesthetic questions raised in end-of-the-world narratives. Satisfies UMass Undergraduate Film Certificate Category IIB
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Barbara Zecchi

TH 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
37697

Integ. Lrng Center S404

bzecchi@umass.edu
This class belongs to the Visiting Professor of the 21st c. Series. Award-winning international filmmakers and film scholars offer classes in screenwriting, directing, cinematography, and other key areas of filmmaking. Students have a unique opportunity to gain hands-on experience and enrich their portfolios. Class can be taken more than once, because content and faculty vary.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
3.00

Barry Spence

W 4:00PM 7:30PM

UMass Amherst
37779

Integ. Lrng Center S404

bspence@umass.edu
This course will examine the cultural phenomenon of the ?art film? during the first three decades of the postwar period (1950s, 60s, 70s). The nature and characteristics of, as well as the relationships connecting and distinguishing, modernist cinema, art cinema, and avant-garde film during this vital period in film history will be the course's primary concern. We will examine the notion of the auteur and consider its usefulness for thinking about this multiform, innovative cinema. What is the relationship between cinematic modernism and the core principles and representational strategies of modern art? Does modern cinema, as Gilles Deleuze suggests, function as a mental substitute for the lost connection between the individual and the world? Can it restore our belief in the world? The course will pay particular attention to distinctive stylistic attributes, but will also look at dominant thematic concerns. There will be weekly in-class screenings as well as regular streaming of films outside of class. The filmmakers we will consider include, but are not limited to: Chantal Ackerman, Michelangelo Antonioni, Theo Angelopoulos, Ingmar Bergman, Stan Brakhage, Robert Bresson, Luis Bu?uel, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Federico Fellini, Jean-Luc Godard, Peter Greenaway, Werner Herzog, Miklos Jansco, Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu, Sergei Paradzhanov, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Alain Resnais, Jean-Marie Straub, Andrei Tarkovsky, Francois Truffaut, Agnes Varda, Wim Wenders.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Andrea Malaguti

W 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
38010

Herter Hall room 207

malaguti@frital.umass.edu
38012,38013,38016

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