Film and Media Studies

The Five College Film Council works to coordinate the study of film and video at all five campuses.

The members of the Council include faculty members drawn from a number of disciplines ranging from foreign languages to literature, history and media studies. They meet regularly to exchange information about courses as well as faculty appointments, and plan a coordinated approach to meeting common needs for instruction.

The Five College Film and Media Studies program is supported by one joint faculty appointee who provides instruction in film and video production to complement courses in film theory and history offered at each campus: Bernadine Mellis.

The Council also sponsors an annual student film and video festival, held during the spring semester.

The Five College FC Film Studies Announcements email list is open to faculty, staff and students interested in Film Studies to share announcements and information. Visit the Five Colleges Film Studies Announcements page to subscribe or unsubscribe.

The email list for Five College Film Studies Council business is for faculty members only. Visit the FC-Film-Council page to request to subscribe or unsubscribe.  Please contact the Five College Academic Programs office for more information about joining these email lists.

Courses

Fall 2021 Courses

01
4.00

Adam Levine

MW 01:30PM-04:30PM

Amherst College
ARHA-221-01-2122F

FAYE 215

alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-01,FAMS-221-01

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Ivonne Montoya

TTH 01:30PM-04:30PM

Amherst College
ARHA-221-02-2122F

FAYE 215

pmontoya@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-02,FAMS-221-02

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Timothy Van Compernolle

W 02:00PM-04:45PM

Amherst College
ASLC-437-01-2122F

CHAP 101

tvancompernolle@amherst.edu
ASLC-437-01,FAMS-437-01

(Offered as ASLC 437 and FAMS 437) Japanese animation (popularly known as anime) is ubiquitous in today’s world. This seminar traces the history of animation in Japan, from the earliest known work in 1907, stenciled directly onto a strip of celluloid, to the media convergence of the present. Animation allows us access to a larger history of media in Japan, including cinema, television, and today’s hybrid “contents industry.” Animation is also shaped by these many media forms. Topics include the relationship between animation and the state during wartime, the rise of a commercial industry, the analog revolution of the multi-plane camera, the digital revolution of the computer, and the stream of experimental animation across the twentieth century, among others. Course materials include films, television shows, computer entertainments, technical readings, and theoretical essays. Assignments, centered on a final research paper, are designed to cultivate research skills that can be applied to popular culture texts.

Limited to 25 students. Fall Semester. Professor Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Michael Kunichika

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
BLST-392-01-2122F

CHAP 203

mkunichika@amherst.edu
RUSS-252-01,BLST-392-01,FAMS-352-01

(Offered as RUSS 252, BLST 392 and FAMS 352) This course focuses on the modes by which race has been represented in Russian and Soviet culture. We approach this topic in two ways: first, we examine how Russian and Soviet culture grappled with questions of race, focusing on episodes in the representation of minority peoples throughout the empire and the Soviet Union; secondly, we consider how Russian and Soviet culture served as a mirror in which minorities from other countries saw their experiences partially reflected or as a source from which they found models to articulate their own experience of race. These two concerns guide us through the course as we study such works as Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground as it enters into dialogue with Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man and Leonid Tsypkin’s Summer in Baden Baden; the representation of Central Asia by such figures as Langston Hughes and Andrei Platonov; the appeal of the Soviet Union to Western intellectuals, in particular African-American thinkers and writers, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Hughes, and Claude McKay; Alexander Pushkin and the question of his “blackness” and universality; the cinematic representation of minorities in the films of Dziga Vertov and Vsevolod Pudovkin. We will draw our critical theoretical models from Homi Bhabha, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Patricia Hall Collins, Johannes Fabian, Stuart Hall, and Mary Louise Pratt, among others.

Fall semester. Professor Kunichika.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua Guilford

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM; W 07:00PM-10:00PM

Amherst College
ENGL-180-01-2122F

FAYE 113

jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-180-01,FAMS-110-01

(Offered as ENGL 180 and FAMS 110) A first course in reading films and writing about them. A varied selection of films for study and criticism, partly to illustrate the main elements of film language and partly to pose challenging texts for reading and writing. Frequent short papers. Two class meetings and one screening per week.

Limited to 25 students. Twelve seats reserved for first-year students. Open to first-year and sophomore students. Fall semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Aneeka Henderson

WF 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
ENGL-276-01-2122F

CONV 308

ahenderson@amherst.edu
AMST-361-01,ENGL-276-01,BLST-361-01

01
4.00

Lise Sanders

TTH 01:00PM-02:20PM; TH 07:00PM-09:00PM

Amherst College
ENGL-287-01-2122F

FAYE 113

lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-287-01,FAMS-212-01

(Offered as ENGL 287 and FAMS 212) This course is designed to introduce students to key issues in film studies, focusing on the history of American cinema from 1895 to 1960. We will pay particular attention to the “golden age” of Hollywood, with forays into other national cinemas by way of comparison and critique. Screenings will range from actualities and trick films, to the early narrative features of D. W. Griffith, to the development of genres including film noir (Double Indemnity), the woman’s film of the 1940s (Now, Voyager), the western (Stagecoach) and the suspense film (Rear Window). Reading and writing assignments and in-class discussions will address how to interpret film on the formal/stylistic level (sequence analysis, close reading, visual language) as well as in the context of major trends and figures in film history. A weekly viewing journal will be expected, as a record of students’ critical responses to the films. In addition, three formal essays are required: a 3-5 page sequence analysis; a 6-8 page critical explication of a piece of film criticism (a scholarly article or book chapter) not already assigned for the course; and a final research paper (8-10 pages), to be revised in conjunction with a peer review workshop. By the end of the semester, students can expect to gain the following: a familiarity with key terms in film language and film analysis; an ability to think and write critically about film, its aesthetics, historical development, technology, and cultural context; an overview of some key films in American cinema history from the silent era to 1960; an appreciation of different film genres, their structure, iconic language, and ideological/cultural meanings; and confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays in film criticism and history.

Limited to 35 students. Fall semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amelie Hastie

W 01:30PM-04:00PM; SU 04:00PM-06:30PM

Amherst College
ENGL-480-01-2122F

WEBS 215; MEAD 115

ahastie@amherst.edu
ENGL-480-01,FAMS-411-01

(Offered as ENGL 480 and FAMS 411) The “essay” derives its meaning from the original French essayer: to try or attempt. In its attempts to work through and experiment with new ideas, the essay form becomes a manifestation of observation, experience, and transformation. Originally developed through the written form, the essay has also taken shape in visual work–photographic, installation, and, of course, cinematic. The “essay film” is exploratory, digressive, subjective; the “video essay” is similarly personal and simultaneously transformative. The “film essay” has the capacity to be all of these things, though in the past few decades this form has become arguably schematic. Working against the conventions of the “academic” or college essay and inspired by visual experimentation, this course will explore film through a variety of manifestations of the written essay. After all, since film comes in multiple forms and offers multiple experiences, it demands multiple possibilities of rhetorical exploration.

The models for writing in this course will come from both visual and written works. Course readings will be collected from a range of historical periods and will run a gamut of approaches to film: theoretical and experiential, critical and poetic, autobiographical and historical. Class screenings will similarly come from a variety of historical eras, genres, and national spaces. Because writing assignments will often explore the cultural experience of the movies, we will visit a variety of screening venues, including a film festival, “archival” and repertory houses, art cinemas, and commercial theaters. Though it will include some lectures to contextualize readings, this course will primarily be discussion-oriented, with attentive writing workshops. Thus experimenting with method and form, students will produce weekly writings, two extended essays, and a collaboratively-produced project.

Requisite: a 200-level foundations course in ENGL or FAMS. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Hastie.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua Guilford

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM; M 07:00PM-10:00PM

Amherst College
ENGL-487-01-2122F

FAYE 217

jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-487-01,FAMS-425-01

(Offered as ENGL 487 and FAMS 425) In the years following World War II, a series of rapid and far-reaching transformations–economic, technological, social, political–dramatically reconfigured American life. Throughout this period of change, cinema served as both mirror and catalyst, reflecting national crises and upheavals while also contributing to the transformation of American culture. This seminar explores both sides of this dynamic, examining how postwar American filmmakers devised innovative strategies for representing the dilemmas of their time, and how artists, studios, and lawmakers sought to intervene in such dilemmas via the moving image. We will view and discuss key examples of popular Hollywood genres from this period–film noir, science fiction, the western, etc.–as well as independent, documentary, and avant-garde films created by countercultural, feminist, queer, and Black artists. Weekly readings will engage such subjects as: nuclear anxiety; suburban domesticity and surveillance; Beat culture and spontaneity; totalitarianism; racial prejudice and civil rights; urban renewal and queer desire; gender and consumer culture; blacklisting, and others. Students will explore such issues through in-class presentations, critical essays, and individual research projects.

Requisite: At least one foundational course in ENGL or FAMS. Open to juniors and seniors and to sophomores with consent of the instructor. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Guilford.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lise Sanders

TTH 01:00PM-02:20PM; TH 07:00PM-09:00PM

Amherst College
FAMS-212-01-2122F

FAYE 113

lsanders@amherst.edu
ENGL-287-01,FAMS-212-01

(Offered as ENGL 287 and FAMS 212) This course is designed to introduce students to key issues in film studies, focusing on the history of American cinema from 1895 to 1960. We will pay particular attention to the “golden age” of Hollywood, with forays into other national cinemas by way of comparison and critique. Screenings will range from actualities and trick films, to the early narrative features of D. W. Griffith, to the development of genres including film noir (Double Indemnity), the woman’s film of the 1940s (Now, Voyager), the western (Stagecoach) and the suspense film (Rear Window). Reading and writing assignments and in-class discussions will address how to interpret film on the formal/stylistic level (sequence analysis, close reading, visual language) as well as in the context of major trends and figures in film history. A weekly viewing journal will be expected, as a record of students’ critical responses to the films. In addition, three formal essays are required: a 3-5 page sequence analysis; a 6-8 page critical explication of a piece of film criticism (a scholarly article or book chapter) not already assigned for the course; and a final research paper (8-10 pages), to be revised in conjunction with a peer review workshop. By the end of the semester, students can expect to gain the following: a familiarity with key terms in film language and film analysis; an ability to think and write critically about film, its aesthetics, historical development, technology, and cultural context; an overview of some key films in American cinema history from the silent era to 1960; an appreciation of different film genres, their structure, iconic language, and ideological/cultural meanings; and confidence in reading critical/theoretical essays in film criticism and history.

Limited to 35 students. Fall semester. Visiting Professor Sanders.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adam Levine

MW 01:30PM-04:30PM

Amherst College
FAMS-221-01-2122F

FAYE 215

alevine@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-01,FAMS-221-01

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Ivonne Montoya

TTH 01:30PM-04:30PM

Amherst College
FAMS-221-02-2122F

FAYE 215

pmontoya@amherst.edu
ARHA-221-02,FAMS-221-02

(Offered as ARHA 221 and FAMS 221) This introductory course is designed for students with no prior experience in video production. The aim is both technical and creative. We will begin with the literal foundation of the moving image—the frame—before moving through shot and scene construction, lighting, sound-image concepts, and final edit. In addition to instruction in production equipment and facilities, the course will also explore cinematic form and structure through weekly readings, screenings and discussion. Each student will work on a series of production exercises and a final video assignment.

Limited to 12 students with instructor's permission. Fall semester: Professor Levine. Spring semester: Visiting Professor Mellis. 
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amelie Hastie

TTH 03:00PM-04:20PM; SU 07:00PM-09:30PM

Amherst College
FAMS-308-01-2122F

WEBS 215; MEAD 115

ahastie@amherst.edu
BRUS-308-01,FAMS-308-01,SWAG-309-01

01
4.00

Wendy Woodson

F 12:00PM-03:00PM

Amherst College
FAMS-345-01-2122F

WEBS 117

wwoodson@amherst.edu
THDA-353-01,FAMS-345-01

(Offered as THDA 353 and FAMS 345) This is an advanced course in making performance in dance, theater, video and/or hybrid forms. Each student will create, rehearse and produce an original performance piece in his/her/their preferred medium. Due to Covid 19 restrictions, these pieces will be shared on digital platforms as ongoing works in progress (with students in the class) and as final projects with a wider audience at the end of the semester. Different strategies, tools and philosophies will be given and explored with an emphasis on taking creative advantage of found spaces and available resources. Improvisational and interactive structures and approaches among and within media will be investigated.  

Two ninety-minute class sessions per week and rehearsal/production sessions as required.   

Requisite: An intermediate departmental course in performance-making and consent of the instructor. Limited to 8 students. Spring semester. Professor Woodson.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michael Kunichika

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
FAMS-352-01-2122F

CHAP 203

mkunichika@amherst.edu
RUSS-252-01,BLST-392-01,FAMS-352-01

(Offered as RUSS 252, BLST 392 and FAMS 352) This course focuses on the modes by which race has been represented in Russian and Soviet culture. We approach this topic in two ways: first, we examine how Russian and Soviet culture grappled with questions of race, focusing on episodes in the representation of minority peoples throughout the empire and the Soviet Union; secondly, we consider how Russian and Soviet culture served as a mirror in which minorities from other countries saw their experiences partially reflected or as a source from which they found models to articulate their own experience of race. These two concerns guide us through the course as we study such works as Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground as it enters into dialogue with Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man and Leonid Tsypkin’s Summer in Baden Baden; the representation of Central Asia by such figures as Langston Hughes and Andrei Platonov; the appeal of the Soviet Union to Western intellectuals, in particular African-American thinkers and writers, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Hughes, and Claude McKay; Alexander Pushkin and the question of his “blackness” and universality; the cinematic representation of minorities in the films of Dziga Vertov and Vsevolod Pudovkin. We will draw our critical theoretical models from Homi Bhabha, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Patricia Hall Collins, Johannes Fabian, Stuart Hall, and Mary Louise Pratt, among others.

Fall semester. Professor Kunichika.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amelie Hastie

W 01:30PM-04:00PM; SU 04:00PM-06:30PM

Amherst College
FAMS-411-01-2122F

WEBS 215; MEAD 115

ahastie@amherst.edu
ENGL-480-01,FAMS-411-01

(Offered as ENGL 480 and FAMS 411) The “essay” derives its meaning from the original French essayer: to try or attempt. In its attempts to work through and experiment with new ideas, the essay form becomes a manifestation of observation, experience, and transformation. Originally developed through the written form, the essay has also taken shape in visual work–photographic, installation, and, of course, cinematic. The “essay film” is exploratory, digressive, subjective; the “video essay” is similarly personal and simultaneously transformative. The “film essay” has the capacity to be all of these things, though in the past few decades this form has become arguably schematic. Working against the conventions of the “academic” or college essay and inspired by visual experimentation, this course will explore film through a variety of manifestations of the written essay. After all, since film comes in multiple forms and offers multiple experiences, it demands multiple possibilities of rhetorical exploration.

The models for writing in this course will come from both visual and written works. Course readings will be collected from a range of historical periods and will run a gamut of approaches to film: theoretical and experiential, critical and poetic, autobiographical and historical. Class screenings will similarly come from a variety of historical eras, genres, and national spaces. Because writing assignments will often explore the cultural experience of the movies, we will visit a variety of screening venues, including a film festival, “archival” and repertory houses, art cinemas, and commercial theaters. Though it will include some lectures to contextualize readings, this course will primarily be discussion-oriented, with attentive writing workshops. Thus experimenting with method and form, students will produce weekly writings, two extended essays, and a collaboratively-produced project.

Requisite: a 200-level foundations course in ENGL or FAMS. Open to juniors and seniors. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Hastie.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joshua Guilford

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM; M 07:00PM-10:00PM

Amherst College
FAMS-425-01-2122F

FAYE 217

jguilford@amherst.edu
ENGL-487-01,FAMS-425-01

01
4.00

Timothy Van Compernolle

W 02:00PM-04:45PM

Amherst College
FAMS-437-01-2122F

CHAP 101

tvancompernolle@amherst.edu
ASLC-437-01,FAMS-437-01

(Offered as ASLC 437 and FAMS 437) Japanese animation (popularly known as anime) is ubiquitous in today’s world. This seminar traces the history of animation in Japan, from the earliest known work in 1907, stenciled directly onto a strip of celluloid, to the media convergence of the present. Animation allows us access to a larger history of media in Japan, including cinema, television, and today’s hybrid “contents industry.” Animation is also shaped by these many media forms. Topics include the relationship between animation and the state during wartime, the rise of a commercial industry, the analog revolution of the multi-plane camera, the digital revolution of the computer, and the stream of experimental animation across the twentieth century, among others. Course materials include films, television shows, computer entertainments, technical readings, and theoretical essays. Assignments, centered on a final research paper, are designed to cultivate research skills that can be applied to popular culture texts.

Limited to 25 students. Fall Semester. Professor Van Compernolle.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Michael Kunichika

MW 12:00PM-01:20PM

Amherst College
RUSS-252-01-2122F

CHAP 203

mkunichika@amherst.edu
RUSS-252-01,BLST-392-01,FAMS-352-01

(Offered as RUSS 252, BLST 392 and FAMS 352) This course focuses on the modes by which race has been represented in Russian and Soviet culture. We approach this topic in two ways: first, we examine how Russian and Soviet culture grappled with questions of race, focusing on episodes in the representation of minority peoples throughout the empire and the Soviet Union; secondly, we consider how Russian and Soviet culture served as a mirror in which minorities from other countries saw their experiences partially reflected or as a source from which they found models to articulate their own experience of race. These two concerns guide us through the course as we study such works as Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground as it enters into dialogue with Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man and Leonid Tsypkin’s Summer in Baden Baden; the representation of Central Asia by such figures as Langston Hughes and Andrei Platonov; the appeal of the Soviet Union to Western intellectuals, in particular African-American thinkers and writers, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Hughes, and Claude McKay; Alexander Pushkin and the question of his “blackness” and universality; the cinematic representation of minorities in the films of Dziga Vertov and Vsevolod Pudovkin. We will draw our critical theoretical models from Homi Bhabha, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Patricia Hall Collins, Johannes Fabian, Stuart Hall, and Mary Louise Pratt, among others.

Fall semester. Professor Kunichika.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Wendy Woodson

F 12:00PM-03:00PM

Amherst College
THDA-353-01-2122F

WEBS 117

wwoodson@amherst.edu
THDA-353-01,FAMS-345-01

(Offered as THDA 353 and FAMS 345) This is an advanced course in making performance in dance, theater, video and/or hybrid forms. Each student will create, rehearse and produce an original performance piece in his/her/their preferred medium. Due to Covid 19 restrictions, these pieces will be shared on digital platforms as ongoing works in progress (with students in the class) and as final projects with a wider audience at the end of the semester. Different strategies, tools and philosophies will be given and explored with an emphasis on taking creative advantage of found spaces and available resources. Improvisational and interactive structures and approaches among and within media will be investigated.  

Two ninety-minute class sessions per week and rehearsal/production sessions as required.   

Requisite: An intermediate departmental course in performance-making and consent of the instructor. Limited to 8 students. Spring semester. Professor Woodson.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paul Staiti

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM;F 10:00AM-10:50AM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
114957

Art 106A;Art 106A;Art 106B

pstaiti@mtholyoke.edu
114957,115430
Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ying Wang

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115056

Clapp Laboratory 225

yingwang@mtholyoke.edu
115056,115436,115532
Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elizabeth Young

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
115425

Shattuck Hall 203

eyoung@mtholyoke.edu
115425,115434
An examination of the gothic -- a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity -- in U.S. literature and visual culture. Topics include race, slavery, and the gothic; gender, sexuality, and the gothic; regional gothic; the uncanny; cinematic and pictorial gothic; pandemic gothic. Authors, artists, and filmmakers may include Dunbar, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Jackson, Kubrick, LaValle, Lovecraft, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Parks, Peele, Poe, Polanski, Romero, and Wood.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paul Staiti

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM;F 10:00AM-10:50AM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115430

Art 106A;Art 106A;Art 106B

pstaiti@mtholyoke.edu
114957,115430
Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge!.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Hannah Goodwin

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115431

Art 220;Art 220

hgoodwin@mtholyoke.edu
115431,115540
This course introduces students to the critical study of media, focusing on electronic media, digital technologies, and network cultures. We will analyze the aesthetics, politics, protocols, history, and theory of media, paying attention to the ways they create and erase borders; affect how we form and articulate identities; invade privacy while providing a platform for exploration; foster hate speech and progressive movements alike; and participate in capitalist economies and the acceleration of climate change. While tracing the global flows of media creation, distribution, and consumption, we will also consider the different issues that arise in diverse national and local contexts.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Bianka Ballina

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116192

Art 219

bballina@mtholyoke.edu
116192,116193
This course introduces students to the critical study of media, focusing on electronic media, digital technologies, and network cultures. We will analyze the aesthetics, politics, protocols, history, and theory of media, paying attention to the ways they create and erase borders; affect how we form and articulate identities; invade privacy while providing a platform for exploration; foster hate speech and progressive movements alike; and participate in capitalist economies and the acceleration of climate change. While tracing the global flows of media creation, distribution, and consumption, we will also consider the different issues that arise in diverse national and local contexts.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Holder

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115432

Skinner Hall 202

hholder@mtholyoke.edu
This course offers the student a study and practice of theater as a collaborative art. Course includes the analysis of the dramatic text in terms of the actor; the director; the scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designers; and technicians. Close analytical readings of play texts and critical/theoretical essays will be supplemented by attending theater productions both on and off campus and by staging students' own theatrical projects.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Zachariah Ash-Bristol

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115433

Rooke Theatre 203B

zashbris@mtholyoke.edu
This course will examine the materials and techniques used in building and operating theatrical scenery. It will include prop building, rigging, and welding for the theater. Students will learn the skills to work in the scene shop interpreting scenic designs for department productions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elizabeth Young

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
115434

Shattuck Hall 203

eyoung@mtholyoke.edu
115425,115434
An examination of the gothic -- a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity -- in U.S. literature and visual culture. Topics include race, slavery, and the gothic; gender, sexuality, and the gothic; regional gothic; the uncanny; cinematic and pictorial gothic; pandemic gothic. Authors, artists, and filmmakers may include Dunbar, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Jackson, Kubrick, LaValle, Lovecraft, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Parks, Peele, Poe, Polanski, Romero, and Wood.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ying Wang

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115436

Clapp Laboratory 225

yingwang@mtholyoke.edu
115056,115436,115532
Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Holder

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
115437

Rooke Theatre 104

hholder@mtholyoke.edu
A survey of world performance history, including: the evolution of human language and consciousness; the rise of oral, ritual, and shamanic performance; religious and civic festivals; and imperial theater practices that position the stage at the dangerous intersection of religious worship, public taste, royal patronage, and government censure. Understanding performance as both artistic practice and social institution, this course emphasizes the role performance has played in changing audiences and as a cultural and political force in various societies. We explore not only how performances were created--in terms of design, dramaturgy, architecture, and acting--but also for whom, and why.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

David Sanford

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115438

Pratt Memorial Music Bldg WRBK

dsanford@mtholyoke.edu
115348,115438
This course is for all who stay to the end of the credits, purchase soundtracks, and argue over who should have won the Oscar for Best Score, along with anyone else interested in the undervalued importance of music to the general effect of a motion picture. We will explore and discuss the myriad ways in which these two media interact. The course will focus on classic scores by Herrmann, Morricone, and Williams, as well as the uses of pre-existing music in films of Kubrick and Tarantino.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bianka Ballina

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM;W 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115440

Art 221;Art 220

bballina@mtholyoke.edu
This course examines films and topics central to the study of global cinema since 1960. We will begin with the New Waves of France, Italy, England, and Japan, and Direct Cinema of the '60s and '70s in the U.S. We will explore films of Third Cinema in Latin America, Asia and Africa in the late '60s and '70s, and examine films of New Zealand and Australia from the '70s to the current moment, with an emphasis on stories that center indigenous peoples. We also will focus on significant film movements of the last three decades, such as New Queer Cinema in the U.S. and New Cinema of East and Southeast Asia. Analysis will focus on formal and stylistic techniques within a political and social context.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michael Ofori

MW 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
115441

Art 222

mofori@mtholyoke.edu
This course will focus on basic Stanislavski techniques: concentration, imagination, relaxation, objective/action, and beats/scene analysis. Each student will apply these concepts to one open scene, one monologue and one realistic contemporary scene.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Noah Tuleja

MW 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
115858

Art 222

ntuleja@mtholyoke.edu
This course will focus on basic Stanislavski techniques: concentration, imagination, relaxation, objective/action, and beats/scene analysis. Each student will apply these concepts to one open scene, one monologue and one realistic contemporary scene.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Noah Tuleja

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
115442

Art 222

ntuleja@mtholyoke.edu
The purpose of this course is to help the actor discover a full awareness of their body so it can be used as an effective tool in creating and performing stage combat. Through a series of classroom exercises and performances this course will focus on giving students a strong foundation in stage combat techniques, including basic martial training, unarmed combat, quarterstaff, and sword and dagger/shield work. Students must be comfortable analyzing scenes of violence from contemporary film and stage and be prepared to work in a highly physical setting.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa James

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
115443

Rooke Theatre 104

vjames@mtholyoke.edu
115443,115027
This course introduces students to the history, art, and techniques of designing costumes for stage and narrative film. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how the designer's work supports the actors' and the director's vision and how it illuminates a production for the audience. Students will have the opportunity to develop their visual imaginations through the creation of designs for stage and film scripts. They will engage in play analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, drawing, rendering, and other related techniques and methodologies.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa James

MW 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
115444

Rooke Theatre 104

vjames@mtholyoke.edu
115444,115014
The purpose of this course is to introduce the history, art, and techniques of designing sets for theater and film. Students will learn how sets have been created in the past, how a designer approaches a script, how a designer's work supports the director's vision, how it illuminates a production for the audience, and what methods and techniques are used in the execution of the process. Students will have the opportunity to exercise their visual imaginations, through the creation of designs for a script. They will engage in script analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, technical drawing, model building, and related techniques and methodologies.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elliot Montague

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM;W 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115445

Art 222;Art 221

emontagu@mtholyoke.edu
This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

02
4.00

Elliot Montague

T 01:30PM-04:20PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115809

Art 222;Art 221

emontagu@mtholyoke.edu
This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
0.00

Michael Ofori

-

Mount Holyoke College
115243
mofori@mtholyoke.edu
Fall 2021 Production: Fabulation
Spring 2022 Production: Red Rainbow
This course is open to any student cast in a mainstage production or serving as a stage manager, assistant stage manager, or assistant director. The student is expected to attend all rehearsals and performances under the supervision of the director. Rehearsals include table reads, blocking and staging, scene work, run-throughs, dress rehearsals, technical rehearsals, invited dress, which culminates in performances for the public. Outside work includes line memorization, character work, and scene preparation. Total contact hours range anywhere from 75-125 over the course of the production.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Hannah Goodwin

T 01:30PM-04:20PM;M 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
115596

Art 219;Art 219

hgoodwin@mtholyoke.edu
This course will explore the idea of virality and contagion in the media, from early film to social media today, attending to the conceptual and historical links between globalization and the spread of biological and digital viruses. We will study the history of "hygiene films" used to educate publics about contagion and sanitation; explore how cinematic narratives of epidemics both real and imagined have shaped ideas about who spreads disease and how; analyze visualizations of viruses and epidemics; and interrogate the idea of "going viral" and the ways certain kinds of information -- and misinformation -- circulate in online media.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Noah Tuleja

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115446

Rooke Theatre LBBY

ntuleja@mtholyoke.edu
This performance-intensive course will focus on specific styles, ranging from the Greek, to Shakespeare, to non-realism. Through a series of classroom explorations, students will learn how to craft a believable character, using the gesture, vocal, and physical language of certain styles including but not limited to: chorus work, soliloquies, and scenes.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michael Ofori

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115447

Art 222

mofori@mtholyoke.edu
The Creative Incubator is a transdisciplinary laboratory of creative explorations. The fundamental objective of this class is to democratize the creative process. As such we shall collectively engage with a wide variety of art forms and artistic processes that will hopefully serve as inspiration for our own creative agency. The class also adopts a highly collaborative approach which deemphasizes the idea of the "disciplinary expert." As a theme-driven and project-based lab, each semester we shall nurture ideas from their inception until they culminate into events. Each project will be approached with a desire for inquiry and risk taking, and a desire to attain the ultimate collective goal.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Elliot Montague

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115448

Kendade 203

emontagu@mtholyoke.edu
Description: The screenplay is a unique and ephemeral form that exists as a blueprint for something else: a finished film. How do you convey on the page a story that will take shape within an audio-visual medium? The screenwriter must have an understanding of both the language of narrative film as well as the general shape and mechanics of film stories. This advanced course will cover dialogue, characterization, plot, story arc, genre, and cinematic structure. We will analyze scenes from fictional narrative films -- both short and feature length -- and read the scripts that accompany these films. By the end of this course, each student will have written two original short films. In workshop style, the class will serve as practice audience for table readings of drafts and writing exercises.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

David Sanford

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115348

Pratt Memorial Music Bldg WRBK

dsanford@mtholyoke.edu
115348,115438
This course is for all who stay to the end of the credits, purchase soundtracks, and argue over who should have won the Oscar for Best Score, along with anyone else interested in the undervalued importance of music to the general effect of a motion picture. We will explore and discuss the myriad ways in which these two media interact. The course will focus on classic scores by Herrmann, Morricone, and Williams, as well as the uses of pre-existing music in films of Kubrick and Tarantino.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

M W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-150-01-202201

Stoddard G2

jmalkows@smith.edu
This course introduces students to FMS through units that pair four scholarly approaches with four influential media forms: the Aesthetics of Film, the History of Television, the Ideologies of Video Games, and the Technologies of Internet Media. Through these units, we will ask: what human desires animate our relationship with media? For what purposes have people invented and evolved these technologies? How do makers use them, and what are audiences seeking in them? These questions will help us see the fundamental forces that unite film, television, video games, and Internet media alongside the elements that distinguish them from each other.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

F01
0.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

M 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-150-F01-202201

Hillyer Graham

jmalkows@smith.edu
Screening section. This course introduces students to FMS through units that pair four scholarly approaches with four influential media forms: the Aesthetics of Film, the History of Television, the Ideologies of Video Games, and the Technologies of Internet Media. Through these units, we will ask: what human desires animate our relationship with media? For what purposes have people invented and evolved these technologies? How do makers use them, and what are audiences seeking in them? These questions will help us see the fundamental forces that unite film, television, video games, and Internet media alongside the elements that distinguish them from each other.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

M W 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM

Smith College
FMS-237-02-202201

Stoddard G2

jmalkows@smith.edu
The drive to represent reality has animated media makers throughout history. In the service of this urgent, impossible ambition, documentarians have used myriad forms of media and produced some of each form’s most complex works. This course examines how they have done so, concentrating on different approaches to documentary (observational, ethnographic, essayistic, autobiographical), and considering work in photography, film, television, radio/podcasts, websites and virtual reality. Throughout the semester, we interrogate the boundaries of the documentary mode; the unique ethical considerations of doing documentary work; and the social, cultural and technological factors that shape documentary’s history and current practice. Enrollment limited to 28.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Jennifer C. Malkowski

TU 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-237-F01-202201

Hillyer Graham

jmalkows@smith.edu
Screening section.The drive to represent reality has animated media makers throughout history. In the service of this urgent, impossible ambition, documentarians have used myriad forms of media and produced some of each form’s most complex works. This course examines how they have done so, concentrating on different approaches to documentary (observational, ethnographic, essayistic, autobiographical), and considering work in photography, film, television, radio/podcasts, websites and virtual reality. Throughout the semester, we interrogate the boundaries of the documentary mode; the unique ethical considerations of doing documentary work; and the social, cultural and technological factors that shape documentary’s history and current practice. Enrollment limit of 28.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alexandra Linden Miller Keller

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
FMS-247-01-202201

Hillyer Graham

akeller@smith.edu
This course explores the relationship between film and culture during some of the most crucial decades of "The American Century." It looks at the evolving connection between films and their audiences, the extent to which films are symptomatic of as well as influential on historical periods, major events and social movements, and the ways in which film genres evolve in relation to both cultural change and the rise and fall of the Hollywood studio system. Among the questions we'll consider: How did the Depression have an impact on Hollywood film style and form? How were evolving ideas about American motherhood puzzled out in American cinema of the period? What were some of the important differences between the way mainstream U.S. cinema and European film represented World War II? How did Civil Rights and the Red Scare become appropriate topics for Westerns? Did the lighthearted veneer of the fluffy sex comedies of the sixties actually hide some serious questions about labor, independent female subjectivity and heteronormativity? Particular and sustained attention will be paid to relations among gender, genre, race and class.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Alexandra Linden Miller Keller

W 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-247-F01-202201

Seelye 201

akeller@smith.edu
Screening section. This course explores the relationship between film and culture during some of the most crucial decades of "The American Century." It looks at the evolving connection between films and their audiences, the extent to which films are symptomatic of as well as influential on historical periods, major events and social movements, and the ways in which film genres evolve in relation to both cultural change and the rise and fall of the Hollywood studio system. Among the questions we'll consider: How did the Depression have an impact on Hollywood film style and form? How were evolving ideas about American motherhood puzzled out in American cinema of the period? What were some of the important differences between the way mainstream U.S. cinema and European film represented World War II? How did Civil Rights and the Red Scare become appropriate topics for Westerns? Did the lighthearted veneer of the fluffy sex comedies of the sixties actually hide some serious questions about labor, independent female subjectivity and heteronormativity? Particular and sustained attention will be paid to relations among gender, genre, race and class.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sebnem Baran

M W 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
FMS-262-01-202201

Seelye 109

sbaran@smith.edu
Desperate Housewives in Argentina? The O.C. in Turkey? Sherlock in the United States? Television defies national borders more than ever. Although TV has travelled around the world for a long time, the rules have changed since the early 2000s. The increasing popularity of format adaptations, new centers of production, new technologies of circulation — such as online streaming platforms — open up new waves of television flows. As television globalizes, content creators try new ways to export and adapt content. By providing exposure to a diverse television content “flowing” around the world, FMS 262 helps students gain insight into the globalization of popular culture. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Sebnem Baran

TH 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-262-F01-202201

Seelye 201

sbaran@smith.edu
Screening section. Desperate Housewives in Argentina? The O.C. in Turkey? Sherlock in the United States? Television defies national borders more than ever. Although TV has travelled around the world for a long time, the rules have changed since the early 2000s. The increasing popularity of format adaptations, new centers of production, new technologies of circulation — such as online streaming platforms — open up new waves of television flows. As television globalizes, content creators try new ways to export and adapt content. By providing exposure to a diverse television content “flowing” around the world, FMS 262 helps students gain insight into the globalization of popular culture. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alison Folland

F 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-280-01-202201

Hillyer 320

afolland@smith.edu
This course will provide a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in making short videos, including: development of a viable story idea or concept, aesthetics and mechanics of shooting video, the role of sound and successful audio recording, and the conceptual and technical underpinnings of digital editing. You will make several short pieces through the semester, working towards a longer final piece. Along with projects and screenings, there will be reading assignments and writing exercises. Prerequisite: FMS 150 or its equivalent (can be taken concurrently). Application and permission of instructor required. Enrollment limited to 12.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sebnem Baran

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-281-01-202201

Wright 238

sbaran@smith.edu
This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of screenwriting. Combining lectures and script analyses, students focus on character development, story structure, conflict, and dialogue featured in academy award-winning screenplays. Students begin with three creative story ideas, developing one concept into a full-length screenplay of their own. Through in-class read-throughs and rewrites, students are required to complete ~30 pages of a full-length screenplay with a detailed outline of the entire story. Graded only. Prerequisites: FMS 150 or ARS 162 with FMS 150 strongly encouraged. Enrollment limited to 12. https://www.smith.edu/academics/film-media-studies/apply-fms-281
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sebnem Baran

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
FMS-311-01-202201

Seelye 106

sbaran@smith.edu
Trending their fandom’s names on Twitter, funding the big screen adaptation of their favorite shows via Kickstarter, and in some cases, getting out on the streets for physical protests—Media fans and fandoms have become more visible in the digital age. However, fan practices pre-date the widespread use of the internet. This course will explore the past and the present of media fandom alongside the ways in which fans have been represented and studied. While surveying the history of fandom and fan studies, we will study the notions of participation, engagement and activism in connection with fan practices. Prerequisite: FMS 150, professor permission only, priority given to FMS manors and minors. Enrollment limit of 12. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

F01
0.00

Sebnem Baran

M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
FMS-311-F01-202201

Seelye 201

sbaran@smith.edu
Trending their fandom’s names on Twitter, funding the big screen adaptation of their favorite shows via Kickstarter, and in some cases, getting out on the streets for physical protests—Media fans and fandoms have become more visible in the digital age. However, fan practices pre-date the widespread use of the internet. This course will explore the past and the present of media fandom alongside the ways in which fans have been represented and studied. While surveying the history of fandom and fan studies, we will study the notions of participation, engagement and activism in connection with fan practices. Prerequisite: FMS 150, professor permission only, priority given to FMS manors and minors. Enrollment limit of 12. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Susan Jahoda

TU TH 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
10645

Studio Arts Building Room 240

sej@art.umass.edu
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
3.00

Amanda Boggs

M W 1:25PM 4:10PM

UMass Amherst
10759

Studio Arts Building Room 16

amandaboggs@umass.edu
Introduction to photographic tools and methods. The balance between self-inquiry and the importance of process and materials as vehicles of meaning. Theory explored through class critiques and slide presentations. Photography examined and discussed both from a personal point of view and in its wider cultural context.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Victoria Quezada Quezada

M W 9:05AM 11:50AM

UMass Amherst
10719

Studio Arts Building Room 16

vquezada@umass.edu
This course explores the creative possibilities of digital image creation and manipulation. Through demonstrations, creative technical assignments, students explore the digital workflow in independent projects involving sustained inquiry into self selected theme.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Susan Jahoda

TU TH 8:30AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
10791

Studio Arts Building Room 240

sej@art.umass.edu
The Junior/Senior Seminar explores unexpected and non-traditional approaches to collaboration, with a focus on interdisciplinary practices. Together, we will investigate and redefine the role of the collaborator and the artist. Practices, traditions and histories will be analyzed in an ongoing cycle of discussion, reading and making. An emphasis will be placed on developing concepts and imagery in relation to contemporary art practice and theory. Participants may work in any medium, format or discipline.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
3.00

J.D. Swerzenski

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
12176

Pierpont House room 101

jswerzenski@umass.edu
This course offers an introduction to the study of film as a distinct medium. It introduces the ways in which film style, form, and genre contribute to the meaning and the experience of movies. Topics include film as industrial commodity, narrative and non-narrative form, aspects of style (e.g. composition, cinematography, editing, and sound), and the role of film as a cultural practice. Examples are drawn from new and classic films, from Hollywood and from around the world. This course is intended to serve as a basis for film studies courses you might take in the future.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03LL
0.00

M 4:00PM 6:00PM

UMass Amherst
12177

Pierpont House room 101

This course offers an introduction to the study of film as a distinct medium. It introduces the ways in which film style, form, and genre contribute to the meaning and the experience of movies. Topics include film as industrial commodity, narrative and non-narrative form, aspects of style (e.g. composition, cinematography, editing, and sound), and the role of film as a cultural practice. Examples are drawn from new and classic films, from Hollywood and from around the world. This course is intended to serve as a basis for film studies courses you might take in the future.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Anderson

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
11987

Integ. Learning Center S240

kta@umass.edu
This class provides an overview of film and television production principles and processes from script to screen and also prepares students for later hands-on production courses. We will explore both the art and craft of film and digital motion picture production, including the roles and functions of the major creative and technical personnel in the scripting, pre-production, production, and post-production phases. Technical aspects such as digital vs. analog media, lighting and color, cinematography, production design, editing concepts, sound recording, and storytelling and script-writing will be covered. In addition, students are given three options for producing a creative project for the course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Shawn Shimpach

M W 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
11918

Integ. Learning Center S350

shimpach@comm.umass.edu
Lecture, lab (screening), discussion. A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950. In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

W 12:20PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
11919

Integ. Learning Center S350

Lecture, lab (screening), discussion. A survey of key events and representative films that mark the history of motion pictures in the United States and other countries to 1950. In addition to identifying and providing access to major works, the course is designed to facilitate the study of the various influences (industrial, technological, aesthetic, social, cultural, and political) that have shaped the evolution of the medium to the advent of television.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Anderson

TU 2:30PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
11925

Integ. Learning Center N317

kta@umass.edu
A hands-on introduction to single-camera filmmaking using digital video camcorders and non-linear editing. Production assignments will foster student skills in the art of visual storytelling: from pre-production, shot composition and lighting to continuity editing and post production audio.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Geisler

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
11989

Integ. Learning Center N345

geisler@comm.umass.edu
An examination of the art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include screenplay format and structure, story, plot and character development, dialog and scene description, visual storytelling, pace and rhythm, analysis of professional and student scripts and films.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Geisler

TU 2:30PM 4:30PM

UMass Amherst
11903

Integ. Learning Center S350

geisler@comm.umass.edu
14536
We will view, analyze, and discuss films by modern documentary masters such as Michael Moore ("Sicko"), Chris Paine, ("Revenge of the Electric Car"), Seth Gordon ("The King of Kong - A fistful of Quarters"), Pamela Yates ("Granito") and many others to further the understanding of the documentary craft and art from a filmmaker's perspective. Students will also do preproduction (research and treatment) for their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, etc.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

TU 4:45PM 5:35PM

UMass Amherst
12099

Integ. Learning Center N345

14539
We will view, analyze, and discuss films by modern documentary masters such as Michael Moore ("Sicko"), Chris Paine, ("Revenge of the Electric Car"), Seth Gordon ("The King of Kong - A fistful of Quarters"), Pamela Yates ("Granito") and many others to further the understanding of the documentary craft and art from a filmmaker's perspective. Students will also do preproduction (research and treatment) for their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, etc.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Anderson

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
12049

Integ. Learning Center S350

kta@umass.edu
14529
This course explores the genre of Experimental Film and Video with a critical eye toward the history and current articulations of this form of production in both feature film and short form movies and videos. The course begins with an introduction to the genre, then explores Experimental Film; video according to three different categories: Experimentation with Narrative, Experimentation with Structure/Form, and Experimentation with the line between Fact and Fiction. Students will emerge from this course with a solid foundation in the history and theory of experimental film/video as evidenced by writing projects, research papers, and student-produced experimental media projects.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Geisler

W 2:30PM 4:30PM

UMass Amherst
12036

Integ. Learning Center S350

geisler@comm.umass.edu
An exploration of the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s and 70s and later, hosted by someone who was there and lived to tell the tale. Through the medium of documentary and fiction films, we will delve into the musical, sexual, artistic, political and spiritual upheavals that rocked America and Europe back then and that continue to reverberate today. This course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Comm majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99AA
0.00

W 4:45PM 5:45PM

UMass Amherst
12065

Integ. Learning Center N345

An exploration of the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s and 70s and later, hosted by someone who was there and lived to tell the tale. Through the medium of documentary and fiction films, we will delve into the musical, sexual, artistic, political and spiritual upheavals that rocked America and Europe back then and that continue to reverberate today. This course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Comm majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Barry Spence

TH 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
12430

Integ. Learning Center S240

bspence@umass.edu
14517
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

F 12:20PM 1:35PM

UMass Amherst
12431

Furcolo Hall 102

14518
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

F 10:10AM 11:25AM

UMass Amherst
12432

Integ. Learning Center S240

14519
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC
0.00

F 10:55AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
12433

furcolo W room 107

14520
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE
0.00

Barry Spence

F 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
12465

Integ. Learning Center N155

bspence@umass.edu
14538
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Don Levine

M 4:00PM 7:30PM

UMass Amherst
12426

Herter Hall room 227

delevine@llc.umass.edu
14521
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

TU 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
12427

Herter Hall room 110

14522
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

TU 5:00PM 6:15PM

UMass Amherst
12428

Herter Hall room 111

14523
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Barry Spence

TH 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
14517

Integ. Learning Center S240

bspence@umass.edu
12430
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

F 12:20PM 1:35PM

UMass Amherst
14518

Furcolo Hall 102

12431
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

F 10:10AM 11:25AM

UMass Amherst
14519

Integ. Learning Center S240

12432
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC
0.00

F 10:55AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
14520

furcolo W room 107

12433
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AE
0.00

Barry Spence

F 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
14538

Integ. Learning Center N155

bspence@umass.edu
12465
This is an introduction to film studies and to the analysis of film. The course explores the complex nature and cultural function of cinema by focusing on time travel as both a central theme of a wide range of films and as a way of understanding how cinema works as a time-based medium. By studying films from various points in the global history of cinema - including films from nine countries and five continents - this course performs a transcultural introduction to the formal and stylistic aspects of cinematic storytelling. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Olga Gershenson

TU 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
23372

Herter Hall room 205

gershenson@umass.edu
16386
This course approaches adaptation in two different senses: media to media and culture to culture. In both cases, we will ask questions about the nature of transformation. What is gained and what is lost in the transition? As a case study, we will focus on cinematic adaptations of Jewish literature and the ways these films reflect and shape modern Jewish experience, including issues of identity, gender, religion, persecution, immigration, and culture. The texts and films are in original English or translated from Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, and other languages. (Gen. Ed. AT, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Daniel Pope

M 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
23123

Integ. Lrng Center S404

daniel@umass.edu
This is both a writing class for movie-lovers and a film class for writers interested in new media. With cinema touching nearly every corner of popular and intellectual culture, new varieties of film writing have flourished along with it. From thinking about what cinema is (and what it can be) to personal explorations of cinema, we will dive into the exciting new opportunities for film criticism, from the force of the critical essay and the art of the film review to the rapidly evolving landscape of new media/video essays, podcasts, websites, social media, blogs, and other engagements with film. The core work of this class focuses on discovering our own compelling insights into films and film art from around the world and from different eras of cinema and then expressing those discoveries effectively in moving images, written words, and audio experiences for diverse audiences. Fulfills Junior Year Writing requirement for BDIC majors in the Film Studies concentration.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Don Levine

M 4:00PM 7:30PM

UMass Amherst
14521

Herter Hall room 227

delevine@llc.umass.edu
12426
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

TU 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
14522

Herter Hall room 110

12427
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

TU 5:00PM 6:15PM

UMass Amherst
14523

Herter Hall room 111

12428
Focus on narrative problems of love, desire, sexual identity, daily life, and death. These films' investigations of how we might gain distance on our life fictions by questioning and undermining viewer identification with narrative. (Gen.Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Patricia Isabel Martinho Ferreira

TH 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
23585

Herter Hall room 224

pmartinhofer@umass.edu
23584
Cinema, literature and the city are historically interrelated, and urban spaces have proved to be a rich and diverse imagetic setting and subject. Cities have been explored in a myriad of manifestations: as a character, as a fetish, as a historical document, as a cultural monument of religiosity, as a symbol of liberalism, sexuality, progress, and decay. This course provides a comprehensive view of the Portuguese-speaking countries literature and film focused on urban spaces, such as Brasilia, S?o Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Lisboa, Porto, Luanda, Benguela, Maputo, Beira, Bissau, Praia and S?o Tome). Through short readings and films, students will gain a critical understanding of many key events that have shaped Lusophone history, culture, politics, and economy. Student will be guided to discover themes related to language, cultural identity, language, ethnicity, migration, economic injustice, unhealed wounds of dictatorship, colonialism, and war. Students will specifically reflect on the following questions: how literary and filmic texts provide an urban archive or memory bank that reflects historical and cultural changes in the urban landscape? How do these texts serve to produce the cities, ideas (real or ideal) about the cities, or even multiple versions of even a single city?
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Daniel Pope

TH 4:00PM 7:00PM

UMass Amherst
23120

Integ. Learning Center N 111

daniel@umass.edu
21055
This course gathers together an array of recent Latin American, Spanish, Caribbean, and Latinx films with an emphasis on addressing the experiences of marginalized people. We will explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these films are made and seen, in many cases reaching vast audiences across the world, and we will push at the boundaries of the category "Hispanic" in cinema. Analysis and discussions will also draw on insights from film theory, such as approaches to world cinema, "Third Cinema," national and transnational cinemas, and Hamid Naficy's concept of "accented cinema." Taught in English with films subtitled in English. Undergraduate Film Studies Certificate categories: III, IV, V
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Barry Spence

F 1:25PM 2:15PM; TH 1:00PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
14534

Skinner Room 112

bspence@umass.edu
This is a history of film course focusing on what is sometimes referred to as the "Golden Age" of Hollywood. An examination of classical Hollywood cinema, this course will concentrate on the period from the 1920s to the 1960s. We will look at the production and distribution practices of the Hollywood studio system, and pay special attention to the way this preeminent form of cinema established many of the norms of the immersive film experience. Among other subjects, we will consider the construction of classical continuity by studying the narrative structures and devices, stylistic techniques, and approaches to editing of a wide range of exemplary films. Weekly in-class screenings, with separate discussion. This course fulfills the Film History I (H1) requirement of the film studies major through BDIC. Undergraduate film studies certificate category: II, V
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Geisler

TU 2:30PM 4:30PM

UMass Amherst
14536

Integ. Learning Center S350

geisler@comm.umass.edu
11903
We will view, analyze, and discuss films by modern documentary masters such as Michael Moore ("Sicko"), Chris Paine, ("Revenge of the Electric Car"), Seth Gordon ("The King of Kong - A Fistful of Quarters"), Pamela Yates ("Granito") and many others to further the understanding of the documentary craft and art from a filmmaker's perspective. Students will also do preproduction (research and treatment) for their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, etc.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

TU 4:45PM 5:35PM

UMass Amherst
14539

Integ. Learning Center N345

12099
We will view, analyze, and discuss films by modern documentary masters such as Michael Moore ("Sicko"), Chris Paine, ("Revenge of the Electric Car"), Seth Gordon ("The King of Kong - A Fistful of Quarters"), Pamela Yates ("Granito") and many others to further the understanding of the documentary craft and art from a filmmaker's perspective. Students will also do preproduction (research and treatment) for their own short documentary, along with shorter hands-on exercises in writing narration, interview techniques, etc.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Barry Spence

W 4:00PM 7:30PM

UMass Amherst
21996

Integ. Learning Center N155

bspence@umass.edu
This course provides an in-depth overview of key theoretical approaches to the study of cinema by examining historically significant ways of analyzing film form and its social and cultural functions and effects. The course seeks to equip students with a command of the diverse history of theoretical frameworks for understanding the medium and experience of cinema, from early concerns over film?s relation to other arts to the way the movie as a cultural form has been reconceptualized within the contemporary explosion of new media. The pressing relevance of film theory becomes clear once we stop to consider?taking just one small example?the many implications of a society-wide movement away from the collective experience of movies in a public theater to private viewing with earbuds on the tiny screen of a cell phone or tablet. We will explore a wide range of questions (concerning the nature of the cinematic medium and its apparatus, aspects of the spectator?s experience of film, and the aesthetic and ideological dimensions of film genre, to name just a few) as a way of putting ourselves in dialogue with various film theoreticians. And we will ground our examination by looking at cinematic practice in relation to theory. This will be done through regular film screenings throughout the semester. This course fulfills the Undergraduate Film Studies Certificate category IIA, IV, V.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
3.00

Kevin Anderson

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
14529

Integ. Learning Center S350

kta@umass.edu
12049
This course explores the genre of Experimental Film and Video with a critical eye toward the history and current articulations of this form of production in both feature film and short form movies; videos. The course begins with an introduction to the genre, then explores Experimental Film; Video according to three different categories: Experimentation with Narrative, Experimentation with Structure; Form, and Experimentation with the line between Fact and Fiction. Students will emerge from this course with a solid foundation in the history and theory of experimental film; video as evidenced by writing projects, research papers, and student-produced experimental media projects.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Daniel Pope

TU 4:00PM 7:00PM

UMass Amherst
23354

Elm Room 224

daniel@umass.edu
This is a course in writing unconventional screenplays, singular film scripts that not only take innovative forms but also tell stories not often found in established film and media production. We will read from an international selection of screenplays, examine clips from unconventional films, and address questions of representation, inclusion, and the work of writing underrepresented characters and untold narratives for the screen. ?Untold? signifies in two ways?it can mean boundless or limitless, and it can refer to a narrative that is not recounted. We are witnessing the beginnings of a film and media renaissance, with new works emerging and evolving that tell stories not commonly told and take innovative forms that can surprise, edify, delight, and enrich us. In this class, we will write screenplays for such works, starting with an appreciation for established forms and conventions of screenwriting and pushing to expand the boundaries of what stories films can tell, and how. UMass Amherst Undergraduate Certificate Categories: IV, V
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Emmanuel Buzay

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
22216

Herter Hall room 202

ebuzay@umass.edu
Following the French New Wave, contemporary French cinema from the 1980s to the current era has revisited the country's recent historical past, in particular those periods of the Occupation and of decolonization, in addition to focusing on social issues such as the suburbs and their culture, immigration, and the French education system, in a variety of films including thrillers and comedies. This class will focus on how these topics reflect economic realities, national obsessions, behavioral conventions, and societal transformations. By the end of this course, students will be able to analyze films and their different genres as cultural products, identify the values transmitted within these works of art, and critically discuss films with the technical vocabulary of film analysis. Finally, this course taught in French will include content analysis, the development of critical thinking, and the investigation of connections with society through the study of Franco-American cultural differences.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andrea Malaguti

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
16152

Herter Hall room 207

malaguti@frital.umass.edu
Course taught in English. Re-examines Italian neo-realism and the filmmakers' project of social reconstruction after Fascism. How Italian film produces meanings and pleasures through semiotics and psychoanalysis, so as to understand the specific features of Italian cinema, its cultural politics, and the Italian contribution to filmmaking and formal aesthetics. Course taught in English. (Gen. Ed. AT)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Patricia Isabel Martinho Ferreira

TH 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
23584

Herter Hall room 224

pmartinhofer@umass.edu
23585
Cinema, literature and the city are historically interrelated, and urban spaces have proved to be a rich and diverse imagetic setting and subject. Cities have been explored in a myriad of manifestations: as a character, as a fetish, as a historical document, as a cultural monument of religiosity, as a symbol of liberalism, sexuality, progress, and decay. This course provides a comprehensive view of the Portuguese-speaking countries literature and film focused on urban spaces, such as Brasilia, S?o Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Lisboa, Porto, Luanda, Benguela, Maputo, Beira, Bissau, Praia and S?o Tome). Through short readings and films, students will gain a critical understanding of many key events that have shaped Lusophone history, culture, politics, and economy. Student will be guided to discover themes related to language, cultural identity, language, ethnicity, migration, economic injustice, unhealed wounds of dictatorship, colonialism, and war. Students will specifically reflect on the following questions: how literary and filmic texts provide an urban archive or memory bank that reflects historical and cultural changes in the urban landscape? How do these texts serve to produce the cities, ideas (real or ideal) about the cities, or even multiple versions of even a single city?
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Daniel Pope

TH 4:00PM 7:00PM

UMass Amherst
21055

Integ. Learning Center N 111

daniel@umass.edu
23120
This course gathers together an array of recent Latin American, Spanish, Caribbean, and Latinx films with an emphasis on addressing the experiences of marginalized people. We will explore the historical and cultural contexts in which these films are made and seen, in many cases reaching vast audiences across the world, and we will push at the boundaries of the category "Hispanic" in cinema. Analysis and discussions will also draw on insights from film theory, such as approaches to world cinema, "Third Cinema," national and transnational cinemas, and Hamid Naficy's concept of "accented cinema." Taught in English with films subtitled in English. Spanish majors encouraged to submit written work in Spanish.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

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