Asian/Pacific/ American Studies Program (APA)

Established in 2000, the Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program offers an undergraduate certificate and hosts a number of events, lectures, and symposia for students and faculty.

Internationally renowned scholars and writers from across the Five Colleges participate in the program and represent a wide variety of fields and areas of specialization, including Asian American literature and culture, anthropology, creative writing, education, environmental studies, gender and sexuality studies, history, and sociology. 

Faculty research and teaching encompass a wide-range of topics, including: 

  • early twentieth century Asian American literature
  • the sociology of immigration and education
  • Japanese American wartime incarceration
  • voluntary and forced migration
  • popular culture
  • intergenerational memory
  • Hawaiian plantation labor
  • the Chinese in the Philippines
  • intersections between Latinx and Filipinx studies
  • disability and illness
  • race and settler colonialism
  • transnational politics of development in India
  • Afro-Asian connections
  • mothering and care
  • queer and trans* incarceration
  • climate change  

Each year, the program organizes a Distinguished Lecture and sponsors numerous events on topics related to transnational Asian/Pacific/American Studies. The program also hosts regular meetings to discuss faculty and graduate student works in progress.

Statement from Association for Asian American Studies

The Association for Asian American Studies unites in solidarity with our Black family, friends, neighbors, colleagues, and co-workers to call for an immediate end to anti-Black racism and the killing of Black people. We are an organization committed to social justice, intersectional analysis, and global human rights. Our fight against anti-Asian pandemic racism is rooted in a common struggle against White supremacy. The recent murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and George Floyd propel us to state, clearly and definitively, that Black lives matter and that we must abolish the militarized police state in which anti-Black racism is embedded. To end global anti-Black racism, we must fight racism in our local communities and educate ourselves and others about the rich history of Black Americans and support, validate, and value Black lives now and always.

-The Association for Asian American Studies Board of Directors

Faculty

Payal Banerjee is Associate Professor of Sociology at Smith College. Her research focuses on globalization, migration and the centrality of state policies in sculpting the structures of displacement and labor incorporation. Her work on Indian immigrant IT workers in the United States has appeared in Critical Sociology; Race, Gender, and Class; International Feminist Journal of Politics; Irish Journal of Anthropology; Women's Studies Quarterly; Social & Public Policy Review; Man in India and in several edited volumes. Her research on Chinese minorities in India and India-China relations has been published in Huaqiao Huaren Lishi Yanjiu (Overseas Chinese History Studies, in Mandarin), Security and PeaceChina Report, and in the book Doing Time with Nehru. Her recent work on hydroelectric power projects and privatization in India has appeared in Perceptions and as a UNRISD Occasional Paper. Banerjee has been a research fellow at the BRICS Policy Center (BPC) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She has taught as visiting faculty at the Graduate Program in International Affairs (GPIA), The New School in New York City, and in India at Sikkim University in Gangtok and at FLAME in Pune.

Sony Coráñez Bolton is an Assistant Professor in Spanish and Latinx and Latin American Studies at Amherst College. Their research draws on Filipinx and Latinx queer cultural theory and critique. Their courses, taught in Spanish, English or a combination of the two(!), intentionally make connections between the fields of Asian American, US Latinx, Black, and indigenous studies. Sony’s research and teaching revolve around the intersection of Spanish colonialism and US imperialism in the Philippines as another “Borderlands” of encounter. Sony received their PhD in American Studies from the University of Michigan.

Kimberly Chang is an Associate Professor Emerita of Cultural Psychology at Hampshire College. She is a writer and teacher of hybrid stories and forms, with a focus on those whose lives span national borders and cultural worlds. Her interdisciplinary work combines anthropology and psychology to explore the relationship between culture and self, and turns to history and the arts as interpretive ways of knowing and representing both the diversities and the inequalities of human experience. As a writer, she is interested in the radical possibilities of creative non/fiction as a hybrid literary form for writing about migration and diaspora. Her book, Accomplice to Memory (Kaya Press, 2017), mixes memoir, fiction, and documentary photographs to explore the limits and possibilities of truth telling across generations and geographies. She is an alumni of the Juniper Summer Writing Institute and the Vermont Studio Center. She publishes under the name, Q.M. Zhang, and is the Prose Editor for The Massachusetts Review.

*not currently taking new advisees*

Floyd Cheung is Professor of English Language and Literature and of American Studies at Smith College. His scholarly work focuses on the recovery of lesser-known works of early Asian American literature including H. T. Tsiang's And China Has Hands (Kaya Press, 2016) and John Okada: The Life and Rediscovered Work of the Author of No-No Boy (University of Washington Press, 2018). With Keith Lawrence, he coedited and contributed to Recovered Legacies: Authority and Identity in Early Asian American Literature (Temple University Press, 2005). Also a poet, he has published in journals like Mascara Literary Review and qarrtsiluni, as well as a chapbook, Jazz at Manzanar.

Richard T. Chu is Five College Associate Professor of History. He is author of Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture 1860s–1930s (Brill, 2010). Currently, he is working on his next book entitled “Building A Nation, Effacing a Race: The “Chinaman” Question of the United States in the Philippines, 1898-1905” that analyses different newspaper articles dealing with the Chinese in the Philippines during the American colonial period. He teaches courses on the Chinese diaspora, Philippines, U.S. empire in the Pacific, and Asian/Pacific/America.

Iyko Day is Associate Professor of English and Critical Social Thought at Mount Holyoke College.  Her research focuses on Asian North American literature and visual culture; settler colonialism and racial capitalism; Marxist theory and queer of color critique.  She is the author of Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism (Duke, 2016) and she co-edits the book series Critical Race, Indigeneity, and Relationality for Temple University Press.

Jane Hwang Degenhardt is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Although her work focuses on early modern drama, it is often informed by and in conversation with questions that lie at the heart of Asian American studies. She approaches Shakespeare’s plays trans-historically and places them in conversation with writers of color and theoretical discussions of race and gender. Her undergraduate courses often foreground Asian American and African American writing, particularly as grounds for exploring cultural and inter-generational trauma. Her graduate courses address the historical underpinnings of race as well as its development in relation to changing definitions of the human and emerging templates for the post-human. She is the author of Islamic Conversion and Christian Resistance on the Early Modern Stage (Edinburgh, 2010). She is completing a book entitled Fortune’s Empire: Chance, Providence, and Overseas Ventures in Early Modern English Drama that explores the meaning of chance, luck, and risk--and how these concepts become racialized and gendered--in the context of early English global expansion. She is also beginning a new book project on pluralistic understandings of the concept of “world” that sources its arguments in Shakespeare’s plays as well as in contemporary creative fiction and non-fiction writing, in visual and performance art, and in film and digital media.

Pawan Dhingra is Professor of American Studies and Contributing Faculty in Anthropology/Sociology at Amherst College. He is Former Curator and Senior Advisor to the Smithsonian Institution’s Beyond Bollywood project. His work has been profiled in various outlets, including the film Breaking the Bee, the White House forum on AAPI heritage, National Public Radio, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Colorlines, Times of India, and more. Publications include the Life Behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream (Stanford University Press, 2012) and Managing Multicultural Lives: Asian American Professionals and the Challenge of Multiple Identities (Stanford University Press, 2007) (both award-winning books). He co-authored, Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Polity Press, 2014). His latest book project, Hyper Education, explains the politics of educational pursuits by Asian Americans and others. He has been department chair and held tenured positions at Tufts University and Oberlin College.

*on leave 2021-22*

Robert Hayashi is Associate Professor of American studies at Amherst College where he teaches courses in Asian American studies, sports history, environmental studies, and writing. He is the author of Haunted by Waters: A Journey through Race in Place in the American West (Iowa, 2007), which explores the connected environmental and racial histories of Idaho. He served on the National Park Service Asian American Pacific Islander Theme Study Scholars Panel and has recently completed his second book manuscript, “Yinz Got Game? Sport and Identity in the Steel City.” He is currently working on research projects related to Asian American sports history.

Moon-Kie Jung is Professor of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is the author of Reworking Race: The Making of Hawaii's Interracial Labor Movement (Columbia, 2006) and Beneath the Surface of White Supremacy: Denaturalizing U.S. Racisms Past and Present (Temple, 2015) and coeditor, with João H. Costa Vargas and Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, of State of White Supremacy: Racism, Governance, and the United States (2011).

Prof. Kang is an Associate Professor of the Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies Department at UMass Amherst and is affiliated with the Sociology Department. She received her B.A. magna cum laude in Social Studies at Harvard University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology at New York University, 2001. Her research is on Asian immigrant women's work in the service economy and her book, The Managed Hand: Race, Gender, and the Body in Beauty Service Work, focuses on Korean women in the nail salon industry and won multiple awards from several academic associations. Her other areas of interest are the social construction of race, gender and class, Asian American activism, second generation families, and ethnography. She also teaches a course on "Asian American Women: Gender, Race and Immigration."

Jina B. Kim is Assistant Professor of English Language & Literature and of the Study of Women & Gender at Smith College. She received her doctorate in English and women’s studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and her bachelor's in studio art and English from Agnes Scott College. She specializes in feminist disability studies, women-of-color feminisms/queer-of-color critique and contemporary ethnic U.S. literatures with an emphasis on feminist-of-color writing and cultural expression post-1968. Prior to joining Smith College, she was a Consortium for Faculty Diversity postdoctoral fellow at Mount Holyoke College in the program in critical social thought.

Lili M. Kim is Associate Professor of History and Global Migrations in the School of Critical Social Inquiry at Hampshire College.  She has served as a Fulbright Senior Scholar and Professor of History in the Division of International Studies at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, South Korea during the 2017-2019 academic year.  She was also a Visiting Associate Professor of History and Ethnic Studies at Harvard University in 2010-2011.  She is an interdisciplinary scholar who teaches 20th-century United States history broadly, focusing on the issues of (im)migration, race, gender, class, nation, and empire. She is currently at work on her book manuscript, In Transit: Migration, Globalization, and Koreans in Argentina and the United States, which traces the history of Korean migration to Argentina that began in 1965 and their remigration to the United States.  Her work has been supported by the NEH, Fulbright, and Whiting Foundation, among others.  Prior to coming to Hampshire College, she has taught at the State University of New York at Buffalo, University of Pennsylvania, and the University of California at Los Angeles.

Prof. Le is a Senior Lecturer in the Sociology department and also the Director of the Asian & Asian American Studies Certificate Program at UMass Amherst. His main research focuses on using Census data to describe and compare assimilation outcomes (socioeconomic, marital, residential, and entrepreneurial) among different Asian American ethnic groups, with a particular focus on Vietnamese Americans. He is the author of the book Asian American Assimilation: Ethnicity, Immigration, and Socioeconomic Attainment (2007). He teaches "The Asian American Experience" and "Bridging Asia and Asian America Colloquium" courses every year and also maintains a website titled Asian-Nation: Asian American History, Demographics, and Culture.

Asha Nadkarni is Associate Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research and teaching interests include postcolonial literature and theory, transnational feminist theory, US empire studies, and Asian American studies, with an emphasis on the literatures and cultures of the South Asian diaspora. Her book, Eugenic Feminism: Reproductive Nationalism in the United States and India (Minnesota, 2014), traces connections between U.S. and Indian nationalist feminisms to suggest that both launch their claims to feminist citizenship based on modernist constructions of the reproductive body as the origin of the nation. She is working on a second book project, tentatively titled From Opium to Outsourcing, that focuses on representations of South Asian labor in a global context.

Mazen Naous is  Assistant Professor of English at University of Massachusetts Amherst. He holds a BFA from The Boston Conservatory in composition and classical guitar performance, and a PhD from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Before joining the faculty at UMass, he taught at the College of Staten Island, CUNY, the College of Wooster, and the University of Balamand (Lebanon). His teaching and research interests include postcolonial literature and theory, Arab American literature, music and literature, classical and modernist Arabic literature, and translation theory. He has published on Arab American fiction, 19th and 20th-century comparative Anglo-Arab poetry, and postcolonial fiction. Naous recently edited a collection of international, interdisciplinary articles titled Identity and Conflict in the Middle East and Its Diasporic Cultures. His current book project is titled Poetics of Visibility in the Contemporary Arab American Novel.

Franklin Odo is currently The John J McCloy Visiting Professor of American Institutions and International Diplomacy at Amherst College. He teaches Asian American Studies in the American Studies Department. Among his regularly scheduled courses is a seminar on WWII and Japanese Americans. Odo was founding director, in 1997, of the Asian Pacific American Center at the Smithsonian Institution, retiring in 2010. He was Chief of the Asian Division at the Library of Congress in 2011. Odo was among the first faculty teaching Asian American Studies in the early 1970s at UCLA and Cal State Long Beach. He continued at the University of Hawaii Manoa and was a visiting professor at UPenn, Princeton, University of Maryland College Park, Hunter College, and Columbia in the 1990s. His last major monographs were No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai`i during WWII (Temple 1004) and Voices from the Canefields: Folksongs from Japanese Immigrant Workers in Hawai`i, published by Oxford in 2013. Odo edited Finding a Path Forward: Asian American Pacific Islander National Historic Landmarks Theme Study – published in hard copy and launched online by the National Park Service in 2017.

Malcolm Sen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Malcolm’s research areas include postcolonial studies and the environmental humanities with a focus on Irish and South Asian literatures; beyond these his interests range from global anglophone to climate fiction. He is the co- editor (with Lucienne Loh) of Postcolonial Literature and the Challenges for the New Millennium (Routledge, 2016). He is currently completing a book-length study of the transformation of sovereignty at a time of climate chaos: Unnatural Disasters: Literature, Climate Change and Sovereignty. He is the editor of The Cambridge History of the Environment in Irish Literature (Cambridge University Press, 2020). Other forthcoming publications include “Godhuli / Twilight” in Loanwords to Live With in the Anthropocene (University of Minnesota Press, 2019); “Sovereignty at the Margins: The Oceanic Future of the Subaltern” in Representing Poverty and Precarity in a Postcolonial World (Brill, 2019), “Risk and Refuge: Contemplating Precarity in Contemporary Irish Literature” in The Irish University Review  (May 2019), “Particulate Matter and Planetary Aesthetics: Post-Statist Ecologies of James Joyce” in Irish Literature as World Literature (Bloomsbury, 2020). His podcast series, “Irish Studies and the Environmental Humanities,” is available through University College Dublin’s Scholarcast, Google Play and Apple iTunes. His thoughts on zombies and other crucial matters are found in The Chicago Review of Books.

Caroline H. Yang teaches Asian American literature and African American literature using the framework of critical race studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her first book, The Peculiar Afterlife of Slavery: The Minstrel Form and the Chinese Worker in American Literature, forthcoming from Stanford University Press in 2020, examines blackface minstrelsy as a US cultural institution that played a crucial role in literary representations of Chinese workers during and after Reconstruction in order to highlight the enduring antiblackness born out of slavery. Her other scholarly publications can be found in Modern Fiction Studies (MFS), MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States, the Journal of Asian American Studies, and Asian American Literature in Transition Volume I (1850-1930), forthcoming from Cambridge University Press in 2020.

Certificate

Program Goals

The Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Certificate Program enables students to pursue concentrated study of the experiences of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the Americas. Through courses chosen in consultation with their campus program advisers, students can learn to appreciate Asian/Pacific/American (A/P/A) cultural and artistic expressions, understand and critique the racial formation of Asian/Pacific/Americans and investigate how international conflicts, global economic systems and ongoing migration affect A/P/A communities and individuals and their intersections with others.
 
Drawing upon diverse faculty-, archival- and community-based resources, the Five College Program in Asian/Pacific/American Studies encourages students not only to develop knowledge of the past experiences of Asian/Pacific/Americans, but also to act with responsible awareness of their present material conditions.
 
Normally, application for the certificate occurs in the spring semester of the final year, when students, in consultation with their campus program advisor, complete a Certificate Completion Form (below). The campus program advisor, after signing the form, will submit the application for review and approval by the Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program Committee.
 
Students approved for the certificate by the committee will be awarded certificates and acknowledgment of successful completion of the program will be added to official transcripts by campus registrars.
 

Certificate Requirements

The requirements include a minimum of seven courses, distributed among the following categories. To earn an A/P/A certificate, you take one foundation course, choose five electives, and complete an independent project. You can apply courses you are already taking for your degree to the A/P/A certificate—something you wouldn’t be able to do with a degree minor. In this way, you can make earning a certificate an extension of your existing course of study or an exploration of something completely different.

One Foundation Course

During your first or second year, you will take one foundation course that offers an interdisciplinary perspective on historical and contemporary experiences of Asian/Pacific/Americans. Attention will be paid to interrogating the term Asian/Pacific/American and to comparing different A/P/A populations distinguished, for example, by virtue of their different geographical or cultural derivations, their distribution within the Americas, and their historical experience of migration.

Five Elective Courses

You then take five elective courses, including at least one from each of the following categories:

  • Expressions. Courses devoted to the study of A/P/A expression in its many forms.
  • U.S. Intersections. Courses dedicated to the study of intersections between A/P/A and non-A/P/A experiences within the United States.
  • Global Intersections. Courses that offer perspectives on Asian/Pacific/Americans from outside the United States.

Special Project

Usually in your third or fourth year, you complete a special project based on intensive study of an A/P/A community through research, service learning or creative work such as an internship, action-research or a fine arts project. This is often done by students enrolled in an upper-level or independent study course.

Projects should include both self-reflective and analytic components. Students fulfilling this requirement will meet as a group at least once during the semester to discuss their ongoing projects, and at the end of the semester to present their completed projects at a student symposium or other public presentation. Students' plans for completing the requirement should be approved by a campus program advisor in the previous semester.

Other Notes and Stipulations

  • Students must receive the equivalent of a "B" grade or better in all courses counted toward the certificate. (In the case of Hampshire students taking courses at Hampshire, "B" equivalence will be determined by the Hampshire program advisor based on written evaluations supplied by course instructors.)
  • Courses counted toward satisfaction of campus-based major requirements may also be counted toward the Five College Certificate.
  • No course can be counted as satisfying more than one certificate distribution requirement.
  • Courses taken abroad may be used to fulfill the distribution requirement with the approval of the campus program advisor.

Students are encouraged to attain some proficiency in at least one language other than English, especially if such proficiency facilitates the completion of the Special Project component of the certificate program. While English is sufficient and appropriate for the completion of many projects involving Asian/Pacific/American communities, many sources and communities can be consulted only through other languages.

Courses

Fall 2021 Courses

01
4.00

Wendy Bergoffen, Franklin Odo

W 02:00PM-05:00PM

Amherst College
AMST-345-01-2122F

MORG 110

wbergoffen@amherst.edu fodo@amherst.edu
AMST-345-01,SOCI-345-01,EDST-345-01

(Offered as AMST 345, EDUST 345 and SOCI 345) The United States has long struggled with challenges created by the need to absorb ethnic and racial minorities. In the face of seemingly intractable problems, one solution has been to designate a “model minority,” which then appears to divert attention from the society at large. Earlier in the twentieth century, Jewish Americans played this role; today, Asian Americans are the focus. This course examines specific instances in which Jewish Americans and Asian Americans both embraced and rejected the model minority stereotype. Course units will also examine the underside of the model minority stereotype, quotas imposed to limit access to education and employment as well as social and legal actions taken in response to such restrictions. The course will feature a range of materials, including plays, fiction, journalism, and visual works. Students will read scholarship in the fields of American Studies, Sociology, History, and Critical Race Studies. The course will include a number of guest speakers.

Fall semester. Limited to 15 students. McCloy Visiting Professor Odo and Senior Lecturer Bergoffen.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Wendy Bergoffen, Franklin Odo

W 02:00PM-05:00PM

Amherst College
SOCI-345-01-2122F

MORG 110

wbergoffen@amherst.edu fodo@amherst.edu
AMST-345-01,SOCI-345-01,EDST-345-01

(Offered as AMST 345, EDUST 345 and SOCI 345) The United States has long struggled with challenges created by the need to absorb ethnic and racial minorities. In the face of seemingly intractable problems, one solution has been to designate a “model minority,” which then appears to divert attention from the society at large. Earlier in the twentieth century, Jewish Americans played this role; today, Asian Americans are the focus. This course examines specific instances in which Jewish Americans and Asian Americans both embraced and rejected the model minority stereotype. Course units will also examine the underside of the model minority stereotype, quotas imposed to limit access to education and employment as well as social and legal actions taken in response to such restrictions. The course will feature a range of materials, including plays, fiction, journalism, and visual works. Students will read scholarship in the fields of American Studies, Sociology, History, and Critical Race Studies. The course will include a number of guest speakers.

Fall semester. Limited to 15 students. McCloy Visiting Professor Odo and Senior Lecturer Bergoffen.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Victoria Nguyen

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115831

Kendade 305

vnguyen@mtholyoke.edu
115829,115831
In 1882, the U.S. passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, the first federal law to ban a specific ethnic group. Over a century later, President Trump would designate COVID-19 the "Chinese virus," reigniting anxieties of "Yellow Peril," even as reports of anti-Asian violence spiked nationwide. This course aims to bridge these two moments by examining the social, political, and historical contexts that come to bear on contemporary Asian American experience. Focusing on East and Southeast Asian communities, we explore issues of citizenship, belonging, labor, representation and resistance, considering how theories of race, class and gender intersect with national and intergenerational identities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Victoria Nguyen

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115829

Kendade 305

vnguyen@mtholyoke.edu
115829,115831
In 1882, the U.S. passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, the first federal law to ban a specific ethnic group. Over a century later, President Trump would designate COVID-19 the "Chinese virus," reigniting anxieties of "Yellow Peril," even as reports of anti-Asian violence spiked nationwide. This course aims to bridge these two moments by examining the social, political, and historical contexts that come to bear on contemporary Asian American experience. Focusing on East and Southeast Asian communities, we explore issues of citizenship, belonging, labor, representation and resistance, considering how theories of race, class and gender intersect with national and intergenerational identities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Iyko Day

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115426

Shattuck Hall 217

iday@mtholyoke.edu
This course introduces students to Asian American literature, considering its historical origins and evolution. Throughout the course we explore questions of identity, immigration and citizenship, generational conflict, war and migration, and mixed and cross-racial politics. Readings of primary texts will be supplemented by historical and critical source materials. Authors may include Nina Revoyr, Ruth Ozeki, Nam Le, Chang-rae Lee, Aimee Phan, Susan Choi, and Jhumpa Lahiri.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Anna Maria Hong

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115602

Clapp Laboratory 126

ahong@mtholyoke.edu
115602,115601
Poetry by Korean American feminist writers has burgeoned in the 21st century with new generations of poets contributing to life of American letters. Reading works by Theresa Cha, Myung Mi Kim, Don Mee Choi, Mary-Kim Arnold, and others, we will discuss how each writer evokes racial and ethnic identity and intersections with gender and other political concerns, as well as the choices each poet makes regarding form and style. Students will gain insight into a great diversity of approaches to writing poetry and will create a portfolio of their own poems based on our discussions. Most classes will involve group critique of writing; several will involve visits with our authors. All are welcome.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Anna Maria Hong

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115601

Clapp Laboratory 126

ahong@mtholyoke.edu
115602,115601
Poetry by Korean American feminist writers has burgeoned in the 21st century with new generations of poets contributing to life of American letters. Reading works by Theresa Cha, Myung Mi Kim, Don Mee Choi, Mary-Kim Arnold, and others, we will discuss how each writer evokes racial and ethnic identity and intersections with gender and other political concerns, as well as the choices each poet makes regarding form and style. Students will gain insight into a great diversity of approaches to writing poetry and will create a portfolio of their own poems based on our discussions. Most classes will involve group critique of writing; several will involve visits with our authors. All are welcome.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kimberly Kono

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
EAL-245-01-202201

Seelye 208

kkono@smith.edu
An exploration of representations of “otherness” in Japanese literature and film from the mid-19th century until the present. How was (and is) Japan’s identity as a modern nation configured through representations of other nations and cultures? How are categories of race, gender, nationality, class and sexuality used in the construction of difference? This course pays special attention to the role of “otherness” in the development of national and individual identities. In conjunction with these investigations, we also address the varied ways in which Japan is represented as “other” by writers from China, England, France, Korea and the United States. How do these images of and by Japan converse with each other? All readings are in English translation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

C. Le

M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
10911

Hasbrouck Laboratory room 228

cnle@umass.edu
This course examines the historical, political, economic, and cultural connections and intersections between Asian and the United States, particularly as they relate to Asian Americans. Drawing on interdisciplinary methodological and analytical approaches, this course will help students to develop and apply an analytical toolset that combines theory, concepts, methods, and empirical data to better understand real-world and complex issues such as early examples of globalization, trade, and immigration between Asia countries and the U.S.; cultural dispersion and the development of the first Asian American communities; dynamics of gender/race/ethnicity; and current issues centered on environmental sustainability, civil society and human rights, emerging transnational media, economic and political tensions, and anti-globalization movements, to name just a few. (Gen. Ed. I, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Caroline Yang

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
13941

South College Room W201

chyang@umass.edu
Introduction to Asian American Literature as an evolving field and to the history, politics, and cultural production of Asian American communities. Themes may include citizenship, borders, space, youth culture, labor, and the body, using texts by and about Asian Americans, including theoretical works, fiction, ethnographic studies, and documentary film. (Gen. Ed. I, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Richard Chu

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15482

Herter Hall room 201

rtchu@history.umass.edu
This course compares the colonial legacies of Spain, Japan, and the United States in the Philippines while examining local reception, resistance, and negotiation of colonialism. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Moon-Kie Jung

M W 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
20813

Machmer Hall room W-26

mjung@umass.edu
Though biologically untenable, race continues to structure virtually every aspect of social life, from life expectancies at birth to death penalty executions. Topics to be covered in this course include the historical origins and evolution of race and racism, gender and class dynamics of race, antiracist movements, poverty, higher education, migration, incarceration, and nationalism. Considering and critiquing various theoretical approaches, this course reaches beyond the Black-white binary and, though focusing on the United States, also examines race and racism in other contexts.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Miliann Kang

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
21877

South College Room W219

mkang@umass.edu
An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are ?gender,? ?sexuality,? ?race,? and ?class?? How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations, and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics, environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Miliann Kang

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
22203

South College Room W219

mkang@umass.edu
How have the figures of the Chinese bachelor, the geisha, the war bride, the hermaphrodite, the orphan, the tiger mother, the Asian nerd, the rice king, the rice queen, and the trafficked woman shaped understandings of Asian Americans, and how have these representations been critiqued by Asian American feminist scholars and writers? Is there a body of work that constitutes "Asian American feminism(s)" and what are its distinctive contributions to the field of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies? How does this body of work illuminate historical and contemporary configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class, nation, citizenship, migration, empire, war, neoliberalism and globalization? In exploring these questions, this course examines Asian American histories, bodies, identities, diasporic communities, representations, and politics through multi- and interdisciplinary approaches, including social science research, literature, popular representations, film, poetry and art.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Asian/Pacific/American Studies Courses

01
4.00

Robert Hayashi

TTH 01:00PM-02:20PM

Amherst College
AMST-208-01-2122S
rhayashi@amherst.edu

Why were media and fans so surprised by NBA player Jeremy Lin's success? Asians have proven their athletic prowess well before Lin picked up a basketball. Similarly, why do observers of American football explain Pacific Islanders’ overrepresentation in college and professional football in terms of innate physical traits? Colonial expansion across the Pacific spread American economic and cultural influence, transforming native sporting practices and spurring a transnational flow of athletes, fans, and their communities. This dynamic explains, in part, the prominent role of Pacific Islanders in today’s NFL. Yet, significant societal barriers have limited the opportunities and visibility of Asian Pacific Americans in sport. In this course, we will study the diffusion of Western sports in Asia and across the Pacific, the development of Asian Pacific American sports in Hawai’i and the mainland, and the increasing transnational nature of sports to gain a greater appreciation for Asian Pacific American sports and its historical contexts. Students will conduct research on a related topic of their choice.

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Hayashi.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Franklin Odo

W 02:00PM-05:00PM

Amherst College
AMST-374-01-2122S
fodo@amherst.edu
AMST-374-01,HIST-374-01

(Offered as AMST 374 and HIST 374 [US]) In the largest incidence of forced removal in American history, the U.S. incarcerated 120,000 people of Japanese descent during WWII, two-thirds of whom were American citizens. Preceded by half a century of organized racism, the attack on Pearl Harbor provided justification for imprisonment of an entire ethnic group solely on the basis of affiliation by “blood.” At the same time, Japanese Americans served in the U.S. military with extraordinary distinction, earning recognition in the 100th Battalion/442nd Regimental Combat Team in Europe as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in American military history. Thousands more served in the Military Intelligence Service using their knowledge of the Japanese language as a “secret weapon” against the Japanese Empire. We will examine the historical background leading to these events and Japanese American resistance to official actions including the cases of Yasui, Hirabayashi, Korematsu, and Endo which reached the U.S. Supreme Court. We will also explore the imposition of the draft upon men behind barbed wire and those who became draft resisters. We will also trace the post-war rise of movements to gain redress, successful with President Reagan’s signing of HR 442 in 1988, and the extraordinary rise of memorials and museums commemorating incarceration and memory-making.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. McCloy Visiting Professor Odo.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Franklin Odo

W 02:00PM-05:00PM

Amherst College
HIST-374-01-2122S
fodo@amherst.edu
AMST-374-01,HIST-374-01

(Offered as AMST 374 and HIST 374 [US]) In the largest incidence of forced removal in American history, the U.S. incarcerated 120,000 people of Japanese descent during WWII, two-thirds of whom were American citizens. Preceded by half a century of organized racism, the attack on Pearl Harbor provided justification for imprisonment of an entire ethnic group solely on the basis of affiliation by “blood.” At the same time, Japanese Americans served in the U.S. military with extraordinary distinction, earning recognition in the 100th Battalion/442nd Regimental Combat Team in Europe as the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in American military history. Thousands more served in the Military Intelligence Service using their knowledge of the Japanese language as a “secret weapon” against the Japanese Empire. We will examine the historical background leading to these events and Japanese American resistance to official actions including the cases of Yasui, Hirabayashi, Korematsu, and Endo which reached the U.S. Supreme Court. We will also explore the imposition of the draft upon men behind barbed wire and those who became draft resisters. We will also trace the post-war rise of movements to gain redress, successful with President Reagan’s signing of HR 442 in 1988, and the extraordinary rise of memorials and museums commemorating incarceration and memory-making.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. McCloy Visiting Professor Odo.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

Program Co-Chairs:

Lili M. Kim, Associate Professor of History and Global Migrations, Hampshire College

Michael Sakamoto, Director of Programming, UMass Fine Arts Center

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator

Connect:

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