Coastal & Marine Sciences

Offering an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in the five campuses.

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program offers an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in a Five College campus. The Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is available to students at all five campuses. Through active affiliations with some of the nation's premier centers for marine study (field trips, internships, and study-away programs), students engage in hands-on research to complement course work. Many students who participate in the program go on to advanced study or professional work in various areas of marine science. Five College faculty from both natural and social sciences teach courses in the program. The disciplines represented include animal behavior, biology, botany, chemistry, ecology, engineering, geology, natural resource management, and zoology in the natural sciences, and government, public policy and economics in the social sciences.

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Coastal & Marine Sciences Certificate

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate enables students from the five campuses to select from a wide variety of marine-science-related courses, including coastal and marine ecology/geology, resource management and public policy, oceanography and coastal engineering to create a cohesive concentration. The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is now available to students on all five campuses.

The FCCMS certificate work includes three components:
1) Course work (6 courses)
2) Field and lab work (80 hour minimum)
3) Independent research project/poster

Under the guidance of faculty advisors on each campus, students choose a progressive series of courses available within the five campuses and in approved academic off-campus programs (Sea Education Association, School for Field Studies, Williams-Mystic, Duke University Marine Lab, Shoals Marine Lab, and others). Students are required to gain proficiency in field/lab work through intensive field courses or internships. Finally, students participate in a “capstone” independent, marine-related research project that will count toward the certificate. Students interested in earning the certificate should begin by setting up an introductory meeting with the Program Coordinator (see People). Once students have begun the introductory course of study, they will be appointed a faculty advisor affiliated with Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences who will assist with course selection, research projects and field/lab requirements to ensure a strong concentration in marine sciences.

Student presenting at Five College symposium.
people at controls of ship

People

The program office is located at Five Colleges, Inc., 97 Spring Street in Amherst. Students interested in learning more about the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate or internship program should schedule a meeting with Program Coordinator Cindy Bright, available by appointment on your home campus (see contact info below). Students affiliated with the program receive information on campus lectures, films and events as well as information on internships and research opportunities in the field.

The FCCMS Program is guided by a steering committee with members from each of the five campuses. Steering committee members also serve as faculty advisors to certificate students.

Steering Committee & Faculty Advisors

Alexandra Purdy, Associate Professor of Biology
David Jones, Associate Professor of Geology

Laela Sayigh, Associate Professor of Animal Behavior

Jason Andras, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
Renae Brodie, Professor of Biological Sciences
Al Werner, Professor of Geology

Bosiljka Glumac, Professor of Geosciences
Paulette Peckol, Louise C. Harrington Professor of Biological Sciences

Brian Cheng, Assistant Professor of Environmental Conservation
Andy Danylchuk, Professor of Fish Conservation, Director of Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program
Adrian Jordaan, Associate Professor of Fish Population Ecology and Conservation
Steve Petsch, Associate Professor of Geosciences
Jonathan Woodruff, Associate Professor of Geosciences

Five Colleges, Incorporated (Steering Committee only)
Cindy Bright, Program Coordinator
Ray Rennard, Director of Academic Programs

Courses

A minimum of six courses in three categories is required for the certificate. Check the complete, categorized course list to see which courses are approved for the certificate. This master list may include courses not currently offered. Some courses may have stipulations (like "with marine project only"), or may require prerequisites.

Note: You do not need to be working towards the certificate to take any of these marine-related courses.

Faculty: Please contact marinesci@fivecolleges.edu if you would like to suggest an addition to the FCCMS list. Include the course number, title, semester(s) offered, and its relevance to marine science.

Other courses in addition to those listed here may be eligible for fulfilling the requirements of the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate. Students are encouraged to consult a Coastal and Marine Sciences Program campus advisor to identify courses that are appropriate for their interests.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, POLICY, and SCIENTIFIC SKILLS

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116782

Kendade G06

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
The statistics sections of biology articles have become so technical and jargon-filled that many biologists feel intimidated into skipping them or blindly accepting the stated results. But how can we ask relevant questions or push the boundaries of knowledge if we skip these sections? Using lectures, data collection, and hands-on analysis in R, this course will connect statistics to biology to help students develop a gut instinct for experimental design and analysis. We will explore sampling bias and data visualization and review methods and assumptions for the most common approaches with examples from current biological literature and our own data.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Justin Baumann

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116783

Kendade G06

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

02
0.00

Justin Baumann

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116784

Kendade G06

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Andy Reiter

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116820

Porter Hall 108

areiter@mtholyoke.edu
This course presents international norms and institutions for regulating conflict, including promoting economic well-being, protecting human rights, exploring and using outer space, and controlling exploitation and pollution of the oceans. The course considers international agreements, problems of lawmaking, interpretation, and compliance; nationality and the status of foreigners and their investments; the principle of self-determination; and interests of postcolonial states as they impinge on the international legal order.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Robert Darrow

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
117131

Shattuck Hall 107

rdarrow@mtholyoke.edu
Environmental concerns are no longer a niche "special interest" in American politics. Today multiplying and intensifying ecological crises are getting harder to ignore, and the need for action is urgent. Deciding how to respond to and govern a climate-changed world is now one of the defining political challenges of our time. This course examines the history of environmental debates in the United States, the diverse range of actors and organizations participating in these debates, current laws and institutions regulating Americans' relationships with their environments at both the federal and state levels, and the processes for making and implementing public policy for the environment.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kye Barker

TU 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GOV-367et-01-202203

Hatfield 104

kbarker@smith.edu
What is the political significance of nature? In this seminar we shall engage this question through a critical analysis of readings in classic and contemporary environmental political thought with special emphasis on the political relationship between human beings and nature. Topics to be considered include wilderness conservation, political ecology, environmental justice, and more. The question which emerges through these readings, which is in the background of the entire course, is whether we might find a democratic and just response to the challenges of the climate crisis. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Qian Yu

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
29994

Morrill III Room 212

qyu@geo.umass.edu
29995
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information system. Emphasis on developing skills using GIS to solve typical spatial problems in the geosciences and environmental sciences.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Qian Yu

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
29995

Morrill III Room 212

qyu@geo.umass.edu
29994
Introduce the concepts and principles of GIS. Both theoretical and applied realms of GIS are emphasized in this course. Some important spatial analysis topics in GIS are also included.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kristina Stinson

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
33251

Holdsworth Hall room 211

kstinson@eco.umass.edu
Restoration ecology is the returning of damaged ecosystems or particular properties of a desired state of ecological health. For purposes of this course, this field can be divided into four topics: 1) remediation of damaged sites where no return to original conditions is possible (e.g. strip-mined sites), 2) restoration of missing natural processes (fire, flood cycles, etc.), 3) return of missing native species or protection of declining native species, and 4) elimination or management of damaging invasive species. Skills for preparation of goals and implementation plans for individual sites will be developed. At the landscape level, knowledge of wildlife restoration, as well as use of tools for management of damaging invasive species (including especially the role of biological control) will be explored.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Timothy Randhir

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
33258

Holdsworth Hall room 308

randhir@eco.umass.edu
Course covers watershed-scale and ecosystem-based approaches to natural resources conservation and environmental decisions. Students will learn various approaches and fundamental concepts for integrating biological, physical, hydrological, and socioeconomics with a trans-disciplinary perspective.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bethany Bradley

TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
33220

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

bbradley@eco.umass.edu
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

F 10:10AM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
33237

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

F 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
33243

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LN

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
33283

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

John Stranlund

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
34856

Integ. Learning Center S331

stranlund@resecon.umass.edu
Economic analysis of environmental problems focusing on air, water, and land pollution. Emphasis is on analyzing the individual incentives that lead to environmental degradation, the valuation of environmental quality, and the design and evaluation of regulations that seek to improve environmental quality. Includes the economic analysis of global climate change. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: GEOLOGY and CHEMISTRY

01
4.00

Anna M. Martini

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM

Amherst College
ENST-301-01-2122S

BEBU203

ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301-01, ENST-301-01

(Offered as GEOL 301 and ENST 301) As the global human population expands in a future marked by climate change, the search for and preservation of our most vital resource, water, will demand thoughtful policy and greater scientific understanding. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology, geochemistry, and management for natural systems and human needs. Lectures will focus on understanding the hydrologic cycle, how water flows over and within the earth, and the many ways in which this water is threatened by contamination and overuse. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The laboratory will be centered around on-going local issues concerning use and restoration of the Fort River watershed.

Requisite: GEOL 109 or 111 or consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Martini.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Anna M. Martini

TH 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
ENST-301L-01-2122S

BEBU203

ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301L-01, ENST-301L-01

01
4.00

David S. Jones

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-105-01-2122S

BEBU107

djones@amherst.edu

The global ocean is one of the defining features of our planet’s surface. It regulates weather patterns, sculpts the coasts of the continents, and contains records of the past 200 million years of earth's climate in sediment on the seafloor. In this course we will develop an understanding of the global marine system through study of its interconnected geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes. These fundamental principles include seafloor spreading, the transport of heat from the equator to the poles, and cycling of nutrients and organic matter by plankton. We will address how the ocean has evolved over the planet’s history, from changes in its circulation brought on by shifting continental configurations and climate fluctuations to its chemical responses to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The course will conclude with scientifically informed considerations of some of the challenges humanity faces in deciding how to use the ocean and its resources. Three class hours per week.

Not open to students who have taken GEOL 112 or 121. Limited to 60 students. Fifteen seats reserved for first-year students. Associate Professor Jones.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Nicholas D. Holschuh, David S. Jones

MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-112-01-2122S

CHAP201

nholschuh@amherst.edu djones@amherst.edu

For at least 3.5 billion years, Earth’s surface environments have supported some form of life. What geologic processes first created and subsequently maintained a habitable environment? How does contemporary global climate change compare to climate variations over Earth’s long history? This course looks at Earth’s climate and its surface environment from a geologist’s perspective. We will develop an understanding of the atmospheric, oceanographic, geological, and biological systems that interact to modulate the climate. Because Earth’s surface environments are products of and participants in these systems, we will also build the skills necessary to observe and interpret the landscape through study of modern coastal and riverine processes in the context of our region’s glacial history. Exploration of the sedimentary rock record, in which evidence of the history of ancient climate and life is preserved, will inform our inquiry into the ongoing climate experiment humanity is running through the rapid release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The scientific tools we develop will allow us to analyze predictions of future climate change and assess possible paths forward.

This is an introductory science course designed for all students of the college. It provides a foundation for further study of Earth’s climate and surface environments. Three hours of class and two hours of lab. Not open to students who have taken GEOL-121.

Limited to 40 students with 20 students per lab. Spring semester. Professor Jones and Assistant Professor Holschuh.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Nicholas D. Holschuh, David S. Jones

TH 02:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-112L-01-2122S

BEBU211

nholschuh@amherst.edu djones@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Anna M. Martini

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-301-01-2122S

BEBU203

ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301-01, ENST-301-01

(Offered as GEOL 301 and ENST 301) As the global human population expands in a future marked by climate change, the search for and preservation of our most vital resource, water, will demand thoughtful policy and greater scientific understanding. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology, geochemistry, and management for natural systems and human needs. Lectures will focus on understanding the hydrologic cycle, how water flows over and within the earth, and the many ways in which this water is threatened by contamination and overuse. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The laboratory will be centered around on-going local issues concerning use and restoration of the Fort River watershed.

Requisite: GEOL 109 or 111 or consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Martini.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Anna M. Martini

TH 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-301L-01-2122S

BEBU203

ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301L-01, ENST-301L-01

01
4.00

Alan Werner

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116481

Cleveland 002L

awerner@mtholyoke.edu
Because more than seventy percent of our planet is covered by oceans, the study of marine systems is crucial to our understanding of Earth History and life on the planet. We will examine chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans at a variety of scales in time and space. We will explore how the Earth's oceans formed, how they provided the foundations for life, and how they continue to affect weather and climate, stabilize global chemical cycles, erode coastlines and provide access to resources. We will conclude the semester with a discussion of the human impact on the ocean environment including sea level rise, acidification, coral bleaching and over-fishing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michelle Markley

MW 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116484

Clapp Laboratory 300

mmarkley@mtholyoke.edu
This course explores the evolution and interaction of life, rocks, oceans, and air during the past 4 billion years of earth history. Some topics covered are: the geologic time scale, significant events in earth history, ice ages and greenhouse atmospheres, continental drift, extinctions and radiations of flora and fauna, the geology of the anthropocene, and absolute and relative dating of rocks. Oral presentations and writing assignments focus on the design and testing of earth science hypotheses, critical analysis of recently published research on earth history, and proposal writing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bosiljka Glumac

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-01-202203

Neilson 102

bglumac@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Luce Ward

M 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L01-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Luce Ward

W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L02-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Greg de Wet

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-251-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 103

gdewet@smith.edu
The study of landforms and their significance in terms of the processes that form them. Selected reference is made to examples in the New England region and the classic landforms of the world. During the first part of the semester laboratories involve learning to use geographic information system (GIS) software to analyze landforms. During the second part of the semester laboratories include field trips to examine landforms in the local area. Prerequisite: GEO 101, 102, 108 or FYS 103. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Greg de Wet

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-251-L01-202203

Sabin-Reed 103

gdewet@smith.edu
The study of landforms and their significance in terms of the processes that form them. Selected reference is made to examples in the New England region and the classic landforms of the world. During the first part of the semester laboratories involve learning to use geographic information system (GIS) software to analyze landforms. During the second part of the semester laboratories include field trips to examine landforms in the local area. Prerequisite: GEO 101, 102, 108 or FYS 103. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
30210

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 245

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This upper level undergraduate and graduate course discusses governing processes in the coastal zone including sea level change, tides, waves, storms, flooding, estuarine dynamics and dynamic coastal landforms (e.g. beaches, marshes, deltas, etc.). Student are taught common computer coding techniques to analyze modern tide gauge, wave buoy, stream flow, and other instrumental observations from coastal, estuarine and coastal river environments. While the focus is on coastal processes, the course teaches common techniques in coding and time series analysis via Matlab that could be applied to a broad suite of problems and environments (e.g. extreme value theory, harmonic & spectral analysis, etc.). Familiarity with some basic computer coding is ideal but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30006

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
30084
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30084

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
30006
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30086

Goessmann Lab. Add rm 64

wclement@geo.umass.edu
30100
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30100

Goessmann Lab. Add rm 64

wclement@geo.umass.edu
30086
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL

M 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30092

Morrill III Room 108

30088
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LM

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30093

Morrill III Room 108

30089
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LN

TH 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30094

Morrill III Room 108

30090
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LQ

W 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30095

Morrill III Room 108

30091
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LR

TU 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30096

Morrill III Room 108

30097
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LS

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30146

Morrill III Room 108

38228
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Martin Medina Elizalde

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30087

Integ. Learning Center N151

mmedinaeliza@umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

R Leckie

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
30101

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

R Leckie

W 1:25PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30102

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

R Leckie

F 1:25PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30103

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
30139

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
Not available at this time
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: ECOLOGY and BIODIVERSITY

01
4.00

Jill S. Miller

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-320-01-2122S

SCCEE208

jsmiller@amherst.edu

Evolution is a powerful and central theme that unifies the life sciences. In this course, emphasis is placed on microevolutionary mechanisms of change, and their connection to large-scale macroevolutionary patterns and diversity. Through lectures and readings from the primary literature, we will study genetic drift and gene flow, natural selection and adaptation, molecular evolution, speciation, the evolution of sex and sexual selection, life history evolution, and inference and interpretation of evolutionary relationships. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

Requisite: BIOL 181; BIOL 191 recommended. Limited to 30 students. Not open to first-year students. Spring semester. Professor Miller

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Jill S. Miller

T 12:51 PM-01:40 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-320F-01-2122S

SCCEE208

jsmiller@amherst.edu

1
4.00

Steve Roof

09:00AM-10:20AM TU;09:00AM-10:20AM TH

Hampshire College
334526

Cole Science Center 333;Cole Science Center 333

srNS@hampshire.edu
Humans are recent tenants on an ancient Earth. Understanding Earth's remarkable history is enlightening yet humbling. Earth's history provides a critical lens for evaluating the environmental processes occurring in our modern world. In this course, we will travel through time to study the evolution of Earth from its fiery beginning over 4.5 billion years ago to the present day. We will explore the physical and biological evolution of Earth and gain an appreciation for Earth as a series of complex systems that interact dynamically and holistically. We will also learn how geologists reconstruct Earth history as well as predict the future. This course will be valuable for anyone who is curious about geology, life, and evolution and is concerned about the future of Earth and its tenants. Keywords: geology, earth, environment, evolution, sustainability
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jason Andras

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116714

Kendade 305

jandras@mtholyoke.edu
Evolution is central to our understanding of Biology; it helps us explain both the diversity and commonality in organismal form, function and behavior that have been generated over 3 billion years of life on Earth. We will discuss the mechanisms of evolution within populations and between species, examine some branches of the tree of life and learn how the tree is generated, discuss how phenotypes arise from genotypes and interactions with the environment, and how development is central to understanding evolution. Some themes include the evolution of symbiosis, sex, and human evolution, as well as the crucial role that evolutionary principles play in society including agriculture, medicine, and even the judicial system.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Molly McCutcheon

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116715

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

03
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Jason Andras

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116717

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edujandras@mtholyoke.edu

04
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Jason Andras

F 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116718

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edujandras@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117113

Clapp Laboratory 126

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
Coral reefs are among the most diverse and important ecosystems in the world's oceans. Yet they face a multitude of stressors leading to their decline in both structure and function -- including ocean warming, acidification, coastal development, and land-use change. This course provides a detailed exploration of coral reef ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry including reading, interpreting, and analyzing of primary literature. Building upon previous research we will work to understand the state of the world's reefs and evaluate possible solutions to the interacting stressors that imperil coral reefs in the modern world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kate Ballantine

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116441

Clapp Laboratory 306

kballant@mtholyoke.edu
Although they cover ~0.6% of the earth's surface, wetlands perform more ecosystem services per hectare than any other ecosystem type. Alarmingly, over half of the earth's wetlands have been lost to agriculture and development. With these wetlands were also lost the valuable ecosystem functions wetlands perform. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the biogeochemical, ecological, societal, and regulatory aspects of wetland ecosystems. Group discussion of primary scientific literature, as well as independent experimental design and the writing of a research proposal are core components. Field trips will sometimes keep us until 5:05 pm, and will provide an opportunity to explore these fascinating ecosystems in person.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-130-01-202203

McConnell 103

ppeckol@smith.edu
Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

M 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-02-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

W 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-03-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

04
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-04-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

L. David Smith

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
BIO-260-01-202203

Burton 219

ldsmith@smith.edu
Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, invertebrates are vital members of ecological communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. This course surveys the extraordinary diversity and importance of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Corequisite: BIO 261. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

L. David Smith

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-261-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 201

ldsmith@smith.edu
This laboratory examines relationships between invertebrate form and function and compares diversity within and among major body plans using live and preserved material. Students observe and document invertebrate structure, life cycles, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. Corequisite: BIO 260. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Laura Aline Katz

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-370-01-202203

Burton 209

lkatz@smith.edu
This course focuses on the origin and diversification of microorganisms, with emphasis on eukaryotic lineages. The first weeks of lecture cover the origin of life on Earth, and the diversification of bacteria and archaea. From there, we focus on the diversification of eukaryotes, examining the many innovations that mark some of the major clades of eukaryotes. Evaluation is based on a combination of class participation, short writings and an independent research paper. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or 232 or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 371) is strongly recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Laura Aline Katz

TU 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-371-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 314

lkatz@smith.edu
This research-based lab allows students to explore the eukaryotic microbiomes associated with various environments on campus, including the greenshouse and marine aquaria. Students in the course will master the basics of light microscopy, PCR, and analyses of high-throughput sequencing data. Students will also use the scanning electron microscope to survey their communities. The work in the course culminates in a poster presentation on the discoveries of the sememster. A one-hour weekly lab meeting is scheduled in addition to the three-hour lab period. Corequisite: BIO 370. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-390cr-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 224

ppeckol@smith.edu
Coral reefs occupy a small portion of Earth’s surface, but their importance to the marine ecosystem is great. This seminar considers the geologic importance and ecological interactions of coral reefs. We focus on the status of coral reefs worldwide, considering effects of environmental and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., major storms, eutrophication, acidification, overfishing). Methods for reef conservation are examined. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Adam Porter

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
26625

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

aporter@bio.umass.edu
We will investigate the process of biological evolution and the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Topics to be covered include natural selection, speciation (the formation of new species), and other causes of evolutionary change; the methods that evolutionary biologists use to investigate evolutionary processes and history; and an overview of life's history, focusing on major evolutionary innovations and transitions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Norman Johnson

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
26627

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

njohnson@ent.umass.edu
The scope of ecology; how organisms cope with environmental challenges; population dynamics; species interactions of competition, predation, and mutualism; community ecology; biodiversity; biogeochemical cycles; selected topics in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. Basic concepts related to practical applications in harvesting, biological control, conservation, pollution, and global change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Akiko Okusu

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26767

Morrill 2 Room 319

aokusu@umass.edu
This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26781

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 8:15AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
26782

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bruce Byers

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
26633

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 203

bbyers@cns.umass.edu
Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

W 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26634

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 206

Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
26635

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 206

Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rosa Moscarella

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
26654

Integ. Learning Center S211

rmoscarella@umass.edu
With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

Katherine Doyle

W 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
26655

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

kdoyle@umass.edu
With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
26656

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LN

TH 8:30AM 11:30AM

UMass Amherst
26657

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LQ

W 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26736

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TU 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26677

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

M 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
26678

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

James Holden

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36503

Morrill 2 Room 319

jholden@microbio.umass.edu
Over 70% of the Earth?s surface is covered with the oceans, and nearly all of the life within the ocean is microscopic. Some of these microbes are photosynthetic and form most of the base of the marine food web. These in turn are consumed by other small creatures that eventually provide food for the larger animals in the sea. Bacteria are responsible for maintaining certain chemical balances in the oceans, and themselves are food for other microbes. Understanding how life is sustained in our oceans is vital for coastal human populations that rely on the sea for food. Other people turn to marine microbes for new biotechnologies, or hope that by understanding them we might understand our own planet?s climate history and how marine microbes will respond to global warming and ocean acidification. Satisfies one of the three required modules for the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-MicBio or BS-MicBio majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kelly Klingler

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
33242

Holdsworth Hall room 105

kklingler@umass.edu
This course provides the evolutionary basis for understanding biological problems in conservation. Evolutionary thinking provides more comprehensive approaches to conservation biology and future conservation practitioners must be equipped with the ability to think about conservation from an evolutionary perspective. Major topics will include: (1) a survey of evolutionary theory; (2) the application of evolutionary thinking to case studies and problems in conservation biology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: BOLD (high marine concentration)

01
4.00

David S. Jones

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-105-01-2122S

BEBU107

djones@amherst.edu

The global ocean is one of the defining features of our planet’s surface. It regulates weather patterns, sculpts the coasts of the continents, and contains records of the past 200 million years of earth's climate in sediment on the seafloor. In this course we will develop an understanding of the global marine system through study of its interconnected geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes. These fundamental principles include seafloor spreading, the transport of heat from the equator to the poles, and cycling of nutrients and organic matter by plankton. We will address how the ocean has evolved over the planet’s history, from changes in its circulation brought on by shifting continental configurations and climate fluctuations to its chemical responses to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The course will conclude with scientifically informed considerations of some of the challenges humanity faces in deciding how to use the ocean and its resources. Three class hours per week.

Not open to students who have taken GEOL 112 or 121. Limited to 60 students. Fifteen seats reserved for first-year students. Associate Professor Jones.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117113

Clapp Laboratory 126

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
Coral reefs are among the most diverse and important ecosystems in the world's oceans. Yet they face a multitude of stressors leading to their decline in both structure and function -- including ocean warming, acidification, coastal development, and land-use change. This course provides a detailed exploration of coral reef ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry including reading, interpreting, and analyzing of primary literature. Building upon previous research we will work to understand the state of the world's reefs and evaluate possible solutions to the interacting stressors that imperil coral reefs in the modern world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alan Werner

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116481

Cleveland 002L

awerner@mtholyoke.edu
Because more than seventy percent of our planet is covered by oceans, the study of marine systems is crucial to our understanding of Earth History and life on the planet. We will examine chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans at a variety of scales in time and space. We will explore how the Earth's oceans formed, how they provided the foundations for life, and how they continue to affect weather and climate, stabilize global chemical cycles, erode coastlines and provide access to resources. We will conclude the semester with a discussion of the human impact on the ocean environment including sea level rise, acidification, coral bleaching and over-fishing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

L. David Smith

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
BIO-260-01-202203

Burton 219

ldsmith@smith.edu
Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, invertebrates are vital members of ecological communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. This course surveys the extraordinary diversity and importance of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Corequisite: BIO 261. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

L. David Smith

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-261-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 201

ldsmith@smith.edu
This laboratory examines relationships between invertebrate form and function and compares diversity within and among major body plans using live and preserved material. Students observe and document invertebrate structure, life cycles, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. Corequisite: BIO 260. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-390cr-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 224

ppeckol@smith.edu
Coral reefs occupy a small portion of Earth’s surface, but their importance to the marine ecosystem is great. This seminar considers the geologic importance and ecological interactions of coral reefs. We focus on the status of coral reefs worldwide, considering effects of environmental and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., major storms, eutrophication, acidification, overfishing). Methods for reef conservation are examined. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bosiljka Glumac

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-01-202203

Neilson 102

bglumac@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Luce Ward

M 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L01-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Luce Ward

W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L02-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Akiko Okusu

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26767

Morrill 2 Room 319

aokusu@umass.edu
This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26781

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 8:15AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
26782

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
30210

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 245

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This upper level undergraduate and graduate course discusses governing processes in the coastal zone including sea level change, tides, waves, storms, flooding, estuarine dynamics and dynamic coastal landforms (e.g. beaches, marshes, deltas, etc.). Student are taught common computer coding techniques to analyze modern tide gauge, wave buoy, stream flow, and other instrumental observations from coastal, estuarine and coastal river environments. While the focus is on coastal processes, the course teaches common techniques in coding and time series analysis via Matlab that could be applied to a broad suite of problems and environments (e.g. extreme value theory, harmonic & spectral analysis, etc.). Familiarity with some basic computer coding is ideal but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Martin Medina Elizalde

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30087

Integ. Learning Center N151

mmedinaeliza@umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

James Holden

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36503

Morrill 2 Room 319

jholden@microbio.umass.edu
Over 70% of the Earth?s surface is covered with the oceans, and nearly all of the life within the ocean is microscopic. Some of these microbes are photosynthetic and form most of the base of the marine food web. These in turn are consumed by other small creatures that eventually provide food for the larger animals in the sea. Bacteria are responsible for maintaining certain chemical balances in the oceans, and themselves are food for other microbes. Understanding how life is sustained in our oceans is vital for coastal human populations that rely on the sea for food. Other people turn to marine microbes for new biotechnologies, or hope that by understanding them we might understand our own planet?s climate history and how marine microbes will respond to global warming and ocean acidification. Satisfies one of the three required modules for the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-MicBio or BS-MicBio majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Fall 2022 CMS Courses: BOLD (high marine concentration)

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

Mount Holyoke College
118810
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
In this course, students will explore the diversity of form and function that exists within oceanic organisms with a particular focus on intertidal and subtidal ecosystems of the Northeast U.S. We will learn how organisms are classified, what structures and systems enable these organisms to function and adapt to their unique environments, and how organisms interact with one another and their habitats.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Instructor To Be Announced,Justin Baumann

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118811

Clapp Laboratory 109

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

02
0.00

Instructor To Be Announced,Justin Baumann

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118812

Clapp Laboratory 109

jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118813
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
Invertebrates are an incredibly diverse group of organisms that live in nearly all ecosystems across the earth. As ectotherms, invertebrates must develop plastic responses to environmental variation in order to survive. In this course, we will explore these plastic responses in marine invertebrates at all levels of organization -- from cellular to ecosystem scales -- through hands-on activities, projects, and synthesis of primary literature.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Bosiljka Glumac

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-232-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 101

bglumac@smith.edu
A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisites: GEO 101 and 102; or GEO 108; or GEO 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. GEO 102 can be taken concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Bosiljka Glumac

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-232-L01-202301

Sabin-Reed 101

bglumac@smith.edu
A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisites: GEO 101 and 102; or GEO 108; or GEO 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. GEO 102 can be taken concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Akiko Okusu

TU TH 8:30AM 9:45AM

UMass Amherst
55731

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 203

aokusu@umass.edu
This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
55732

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 301

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
55733

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 302

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Andrew Danylchuk

W 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
45305

Holdsworth 301

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Recreational angling is an extremely popular leisure activity that contributes a great deal of revenue to the global economy. However, recent estimates show that recreational angling is also contributing to a great deal of pressure on fish stocks even when compared to commercial fisheries. Over the past 10 years the science of recreational fisheries has evolved to include fields such as conservation physiology as a means to understand the mechanisms behind the potential impacts on recreationally targeted fish stocks. In addition, more emphasis is also being paid to the human dimensions of recreational angling as a way to identify the motivations behind anglers, non-profit conservation organizations, industry, and government when it comes to what is defined as the sustainable use of recreational fisheries.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Robert Deconto

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
47717

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 245

deconto@geo.umass.edu
An intensive survey of physical and chemical oceanography, emphasizing the role of the ocean as a system influencing the Earth's surficial processes and climate. Topics include the composition, properties and behavior of seawater, wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulation theory, air-sea interactions, the flux of materials from the continents to the oceans, biogeochemical cycles (including the marine carbon cycle), and the role of the ocean in past, present, and future climatic change. Attendance at an accompanying weekly seminar required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

R Leckie

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
47627

Integ. Learning Center N151

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
54986
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

R Leckie

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
54986

Integ. Learning Center N151

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
47627
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Isla Castaneda

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
55724

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

isla@geo.umass.edu
The oceans cover about 71% of Earth's surface and yet the ocean basins are vast regions still shrouded in mystery, where new discoveries are being made every year. In this course, you will be provided with a basic knowledge of how the global ocean works, how it impacts and controls the habitability of our planet, and how vital it is to our very existence. Major topics that will be explored include: 1) the hydrosphere, atmosphere and global climate, 2) ocean circulation, 3) the marine biosphere, and 4) coastal habitats, natural hazards, and human impacts. Through hands-on classroom activities, the notion of scientific thinking and analysis will be investigated. We will discuss how researchers collect data, form ideas, and then test those ideas. A goal of this course is to understand the scientific theories that help us understand Earth processes and history while gaining a holistic view of our integrated geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and cryosphere. In addition to a broad introduction to the science of oceanography, and the scientific principles upon which it is based, a main focus of this course is on the importance of the ocean in our daily lives.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
51432

Morrill Sci Ctr (1) Room N375

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Overview of the biological, sociological, historical, and economic factors that influence the use and conservation of our nation's fisheries resources. Prerequisite: One semester general biology or permission of instructor
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lisa Komoroske

M W 11:15AM 12:30PM

UMass Amherst
51478

Holdsworth Hall room 105

lkomoroske@umass.edu
In this course, we will learn about how key properties of marine species and ecosystems are unique or shared with terrestrial ecosystems, and how this shapes both major threats and innovative solutions. We will assess human threats to ocean biodiversity and mechanisms for dealing with these risks, with an emphasis on marine reserves and other management approaches for building ecological resilience. Using active lectures, readings and case studies, discussions, group projects, writing, guest experts and field trips we will evaluate the causes and consequences of diversity loss, and what legal frameworks and grassroots conservation actions effectively combat marine environmental degradation. Readings will include those drawn from textbooks, peer-reviewed scientific literature, and a variety of other materials, including media coverage of current events. The culmination of the course is a small group research project to evaluate and communicate a marine conservation challenge & effective solutions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Brian Cheng

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
51474

Holdsworth Hall room 105

bscheng@umass.edu
Advanced course in marine ecology, focused on how organisms interact with the ocean environment. We will explore Earth?s major marine ecosystems and investigate the ecological processes that create biological patterns within these habitats. We will use field techniques to collect biological data in local New England coastal systems. Together, we shall discover how marine ecology links to other disciplines such as chemistry, physics, and geography. The course will address ways that ecological theory can inform ocean problems such as climate change, biological invasions, nutrient enrichment, and habitat destruction.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TU 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
55933

Holdsworth Hall room 211

Advanced course in marine ecology, focused on how organisms interact with the ocean environment. We will explore Earth?s major marine ecosystems and investigate the ecological processes that create biological patterns within these habitats. We will use field techniques to collect biological data in local New England coastal systems. Together, we shall discover how marine ecology links to other disciplines such as chemistry, physics, and geography. The course will address ways that ecological theory can inform ocean problems such as climate change, biological invasions, nutrient enrichment, and habitat destruction.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Fall 2022 CMS Courses: ECOLOGY and BIODIVERSITY

01
4.00

Michael E. Hood, Ethan J. Temeles

MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM

Amherst College
BIOL-181-01-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

An introduction to the evolution, ecology, and behavior of organisms and how these relate to the diversity of life. Following a discussion of the core components of evolutionary theory, we'll examine how evolutionary processes have shaped morphological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations in organisms that solve many of life's problems, ranging from how to find or acquire food and avoid being eaten, to how to attract and locate mates, and how to optimize reproduction throughout a lifetime. We'll relate and compare characteristics of animals, plants, fungi, protists, and bacteria, examining how and why these organisms have arrived at various solutions to life's problems. Laboratory exercises will complement lectures and will involve field experiments on natural selection and laboratory studies of vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. Four classroom hours and three laboratory hours per week.

Fall semester. Professors Hood and Temeles; Lab Coordinator Kristensen.

Please note that the same textbook is used for both BIOL 181 and BIOL 191.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Michael E. Hood, Ethan J. Temeles

TH 01:00 PM-01:50 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181F-01-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

02
0.00

Michael E. Hood, Ethan J. Temeles

F 01:00 PM-01:50 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181F-02-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

01
2.00

Michael E. Hood, Thea V. Kristensen, Ethan J. Temeles

T 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-01-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

02
2.00

Michael E. Hood, Thea V. Kristensen, Ethan J. Temeles

W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-02-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

03
2.00

Michael E. Hood, Thea V. Kristensen, Ethan J. Temeles

TH 08:00 AM-11:00 AM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-03-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

04
2.00

Michael E. Hood, Thea V. Kristensen, Ethan J. Temeles

TH 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-04-2223F
mhood@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu ejtemeles@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Ethan D. Clotfelter

MW 12:30 PM-01:50 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-281-01-2223F
edclotfelter@amherst.edu

Shaped by millions of years of evolution, animals have evolved myriad abilities to respond to their environment, their potential predators and prey, and members of their own species. This course examines animal behavior from both a mechanistic and a functional perspective. Drawing upon examples from a diverse range of taxa, and using articles from the primary scientific literature, we will discuss topics such as behavioral endocrinology, sexual selection and mating systems, animal communication, and kinship and cooperation. Four classroom hours and three laboratory hours per week; the laboratory projects will require additional time outside of class.

In Fall 2022, the laboratory will be structured as a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE).  The focus will be a semester-long, field-based project on bird behavior in the Wildlife Sanctuary.  Students will be outdoors in the Sanctuary under almost all weather conditions.  Students can register for either laboratory section, both of which will be held at low enrollments to facilitate field research.

Requisite: BIOL 181. Limited to 8 students per lab section. Fall semester. Professor Clotfelter.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
0.00

Ethan D. Clotfelter

T 08:00 AM-11:00 AM

Amherst College
BIOL-281L-01-2223F
edclotfelter@amherst.edu

02
0.00

Ethan D. Clotfelter

TH 08:00 AM-11:00 AM

Amherst College
BIOL-281L-02-2223F
edclotfelter@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Martha Hoopes

MWF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
118111
mhoopes@mtholyoke.edu
This ecology course will cover the fundamental factors controlling the distribution and abundance of organisms, including interactions with the abiotic environment, fitness and natural selection, population growth and dynamics, species interactions, community dynamics, and diversity. We will address variation across space and time. The course will combine observational, experimental, and mathematical approaches to some of the applications of ecological theory, including conservation, disease dynamics, and biological control.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Martha Hoopes,Molly McCutcheon

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118112

Clapp Laboratory 008

mhoopes@mtholyoke.edummccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

02
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Martha Hoopes

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118113

Clapp Laboratory 008

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edumhoopes@mtholyoke.edu

03
0.00

Martha Hoopes,Molly McCutcheon

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118114

Clapp Laboratory 008

mhoopes@mtholyoke.edummccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

04
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Martha Hoopes

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118116

Clapp Laboratory 008

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edumhoopes@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

L. David Smith

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-130-01-202301
ldsmith@smith.edu
Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Denise Lello

M 1:30 PM - 4:20 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 223

dlello@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mariana Abarca

M W F 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-266-01-202301
mabarca@smith.edu
This general ecology course provides a conceptual foundation for understanding ecological processes
from population dynamics to ecosystem function. Fundamental ecological concepts are covered within
the context of current environmental challenges arising from global change. This framing illuminates
how population dynamics, community composition and trophic interactions affect ecosystem function
and ecosystem services. Prerequisites: Bio 130 or an equivalent course in ecology or environmental
science.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Mariana Abarca

W 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-267-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 314

mabarca@smith.edu
This general ecology laboratory course provides hands-on experience in the execution of ecological experiments in the field. Students will participate in study design, data curation, analysis, and interpretation. All statistical analyses will be conducted in R. Enrollment limited to 18. Corequisite: BIO 266.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

L. David Smith

M 3:05 PM - 4:20 PM; W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-390cb-01-202301
ldsmith@smith.edu
Conservation biology combines ecological and evolutionary principles with resource management, the social sciences, and ethics to understand, manage and maintain biodiversity. This seminar is designed to familiarize students with the questions conservation biologists ask and the methods they use to conserve life on Earth. Students engage in problem-solving exercises that examine conservation-related questions at the genetic, population, community, landscape or ecosystem levels and employ suitable analytical techniques or strategies to address the questions. Students discuss a related article from the primary literature to illustrate the use of each technique. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Sara B. Pruss

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-231-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 103

spruss@smith.edu
A study of the major evolutionary events in the history of life, with a special focus on marine invertebrates. Special topics include evolution, functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, the origin of life, mass extinction and origination, and how life has changed through time. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: GEO 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or GEO 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. GEO 102 can be taken concurrently; open also to students who have fulfilled the basis for the BIO major. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Sara B. Pruss

W 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-231-L01-202301

Sabin-Reed 106

spruss@smith.edu
A study of the major evolutionary events in the history of life, with a special focus on marine invertebrates. Special topics include evolution, functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, the origin of life, mass extinction and origination, and how life has changed through time. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: GEO 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or GEO 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. GEO 102 can be taken concurrently; open also to students who have fulfilled the basis for the BIO major. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Byers

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
43556

Integ. Learning Center S211

bbyers@cns.umass.edu
We will investigate the process of biological evolution and the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Topics to be covered include natural selection, speciation (the formation of new species), and other causes of evolutionary change; the methods that evolutionary biologists use to investigate evolutionary processes and history; and an overview of life's history, focusing on major evolutionary innovations and transitions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Christiane Healey

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
43558

Integ. Learning Center S331

christiane.healey@umass.edu
The scope of ecology; how organisms cope with environmental challenges; population dynamics; species interactions of competition, predation, and mutualism; community ecology; biodiversity; biogeochemical cycles; selected topics in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. Basic concepts related to practical applications in harvesting, biological control, conservation, pollution, and global change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeffrey Podos

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
43583

Morrill Sci. Ctr.1 rm N326

jpodos@umass.edu
Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

M 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
43617

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

W 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
43618

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Elizabeth Jakob

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
43675

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 203

ejakob@umass.edu
Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02LL

TU 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
43676

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02LM

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
43677

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Anne Averill

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
51458

Holdsworth Hall room 312A

averill@eco.umass.edu
How does an understanding of behaviors and their adaptive significance contribute to conservation of an animal species? We will focus on fundamentals of animal behavior and review studies where the application of animal behavior is relevant in wildlife protection. We will see how theory and data gathered through traditional and new techniques in animal behavior and behavioral ecology can be used to understand the impact of ongoing anthropogenic threats. Class time will be used to discuss textbook chapters and scientific papers and to present team projects. We will review the research process with a focus on honing the skills required to garner background information, to pose clear questions and state hypotheses, and to imagine the methods and type of data generated to test the hypotheses.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Fall 2022 CMS Courses: GEOLOGY and CHEMISTRY

01
4.00

Nicholas D. Holschuh

MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-109-01-2223F
nholschuh@amherst.edu

Humankind is a major agent of environmental change. With each new hurricane, wildfire, and heat wave, public conversations turn to the topic of anthropogenic climate change. But it can be difficult to separate what we know with confidence from what we think we know, and what we are unsure of, given the complex information landscape that defines our moment in time. This leaves many people asking "Is climate change happening? Is it us? Where are we headed? How fast? How do we know?" In this class, we will address these questions directly with a focus on building an interdisciplinary understanding of Earth's climate system. In addition, we will discuss the disparate impacts of climate change on communities around the world, how climate information gets shared between scientists and citizens, and the challenges of building consensus on climate issues.

The internet presents a double-edged sword for climate communication - it is our primary tool for sharing the data and models used to understand Earth's climate, but can be a platform for misinformation and mischaracterization of science for political ends. We will explore this dichotomy in detail, through both the direct download and interpretation of climate data and an evaluation of the way climate change is discussed in the public forum. We will meet three times a week with lecture, small group discussion, and an end goal of producing digital media to share our collective understanding of climate with a broader audience.

Three class meetings per week. This course is open to all students of the College. Limited to 48 students. Fall Semester. Assistant Professor Holschuh. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Tekla A. Harms

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-111-01-2223F
taharms@amherst.edu

How well do you know the planet on which we live? In this course we will explore Earth from its core to its surface, from the mountains to the deep ocean basins, from the past and present to the future. The earth is an evolving and dynamic system, changing on time scales that range from seconds, to millennia, to eons: volcanos erupt, earthquakes vibrate the globe, continents separate and collide, and mountains rise only to be worn away and rise again. What physical processes drive this dynamism? How does the restless nature of Earth impact our residency? Studying active geologic processes will provide us with a means to decode the history of Earth as written in rocks; analyzing the rock record allows us to test hypotheses about the formation and continual modification of the planet.  With a geologic understanding of your home planet, students will emerge from the course with an expanded notion of what it is to be human. This is a science course designed for all Amherst students.

Three hours of class and two hours of lab in which the student gains direct experience in the science through demonstrations, examination of earth materials, and projects. Lab materials will be provided for remote students.

Limited to 60 students with 20 students per lab. Fall semester: Professor Harms. Spring semester: Assistant Professor Bernard and Professor Harms.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Tekla A. Harms

W 02:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-111L-01-2223F
taharms@amherst.edu

02
0.00

Tekla A. Harms

TH 08:00 AM-10:00 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-111L-02-2223F
taharms@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Anna M. Martini

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-301-01-2223F
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301-01, ENST-301-01

(Offered as GEOL 301 and ENST 301) As the global human population expands in a future marked by climate change, the search for and preservation of our most vital resource, water, will demand thoughtful policy and greater scientific understanding. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology, geochemistry, and management for natural systems and human needs. Lectures will focus on understanding the hydrologic cycle, how water flows over and within the earth, and the many ways in which this water is threatened by contamination and overuse. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The laboratory will be centered around on-going local issues concerning use and restoration of the Fort River watershed.

Requisite: GEOL 109 or 111 or consent of the instructor. Fall semester. Professor Martini.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Anna M. Martini

T 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-301L-01-2223F
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301L-01, ENST-301L-01

01
4.00

David S. Jones

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-311-01-2223F
djones@amherst.edu

From the muddy Mississippi River delta to the clear waters of the Bahamas, from the bottom of the Greenland ice sheet to the shifting dunes of the Namib sand sea, sediment is continually being produced, transported, and deposited on the planet’s surface. These processes are fundamentally linked to global climate and tectonics. Sedimentary rocks are therefore archives of environmental, climatic, and tectonic changes through Earth history. In this class, students will learn how to interpret the sedimentary rock record, on scales ranging from individual grains to kilometers-thick sequences of strata. Students will develop an understanding of sedimentary processes in modern environments and learn how to interpret the sedimentary rock record.

GEOL 311 will be conducted remotely, using a combination of synchronous and asynchronous activities. In lab, students will participate in virtual field trips, do hands-on work with rock specimens, practice techniques of image interpretation, and learn to manipulate sedimentary data sets. Students will be guided through the course by close, regular interaction with the instructor as would be true in a classroom setting. We will draw inspiration for our remote studies from the success of the Mars Curiosity Rover, which is essentially a tool to do sedimentology on another planet!  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week.

Requisite: GEOL 111. Recommended requisite: GEOL 112.  Fall 2022  Professor Jones.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

David S. Jones

TH 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-311L-01-2223F
djones@amherst.edu

1
4.00

Christina Cianfrani

01:00PM-02:20PM M;01:00PM-02:20PM W

Hampshire College
335172

Cole Science Center 333;Cole Science Center 333

ccNS@hampshire.edu
335172,335173
Wetlands provide many ecosystem services including flood control, water filtration, and storm protection and are among the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the world. Constructed wetlands utilize these principles to treat waste generated by humans (e.g. stormwater, greywater, wastewater). In this course we will explore the structure and function of natural wetland systems and then apply this knowledge in understanding the role constructed wetlands can play in the treatment of waste. Specifically we will study the design, hydraulics, and nutrient and pollutant removal of different types of constructed wetlands. Students will explore the primary literature, work in groups to complete lab exercises, and tour constructed wetland systems on Hampshire's campus. Basic topics will include the hydrologic cycle, biogeochemical cycles, greywater recycling, and stormwater reuse. Keywords: environmental science, hydrology, natural resources, ecology
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alan Werner

TTH 10:30AM-11:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
118389

Clapp Laboratory 305

awerner@mtholyoke.edu
The surface of the Earth is a history book of past environmental change. Every hill and valley, every erosional feature and every deposit is the result of processes acting at the Earth's surface. In this course we study these processes (e.g. glaciers, rivers, slopes, coastlines, arid regions, frozen ground, cave formation, soil development and groundwater) to understand how they work and to understand the resulting landforms and deposits. With this understanding we can then observe different landforms and deposits and infer past processes (i.e. environments of deposition). Field work and trips allow students to explore first-hand the processes that have created and modified the Earth's surface.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Alan Werner

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
118390

Clapp Laboratory 305

awerner@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Cristina Suarez

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
CHM-346-01-202301

Ford 322

csuarez@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Mona Kulp

TU 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM

Smith College
CHM-346-L01-202301

Ford 322

mkulp@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Mona Kulp

TH 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM

Smith College
CHM-346-L02-202301

Ford 322

mkulp@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amy Larson Rhodes

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
GEO-101-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 103

arhodes@smith.edu
Geology is a study of the Earth. In this course, we will examine the processes that formed the Earth and that have continued to change the planet during its 4.57 billion year history. In rocks, minerals and the landscape, geologists see puzzles that tell a story about Earth’s past. In this course, you will develop your geologic observation skills. Together, we will investigate the origins of minerals and rocks and the dynamic processes that form volcanoes, cause earthquakes, shape landscapes, create natural resources, and control our climate—today as well as during the Earth’s past. We learn to view the Earth with a new perspective and appreciate how the planet is constantly changing, even if at extremely slow rates. Students planning to major in geosciences should also take GEO 102 concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Greg de Wet

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-104-01-202301
gdewet@smith.edu
This course seeks to answer the following questions: What do we know about past climate and how do we know it? What causes climate to change? What have been the results of relatively recent climate change on human populations? What is happening today? What is likely to happen in the future? What choices do we have?
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Matthew Winnick

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
47745

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

mwinnick@umass.edu
With lab. Chemical processes affecting the distribution and circulation of chemical compounds in natural waters. Geochemistry of precipitation, rivers, lakes, groundwater, and oceans; applications of thermodynamic equilibria to predicting composition of aqueous systems. Behavior of trace metals and radionuclides in near surface environments. Prerequisite: Chem 111, 112.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TH 11:30AM 2:30PM

UMass Amherst
47746

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (IV) rm N301

With lab. Chemical processes affecting the distribution and circulation of chemical compounds in natural waters. Geochemistry of precipitation, rivers, lakes, groundwater, and oceans; applications of thermodynamic equilibria to predicting composition of aqueous systems. Behavior of trace metals and radionuclides in near surface environments. Prerequisite: Chem 111, 112.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Raymond Bradley

TU TH 8:30AM 10:00AM

UMass Amherst
47727

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

rbradley@geo.umass.edu
Methods used in reconstructing climate before the period of instrumental records and their application in understanding late Quaternary climatic fluctuations. Topics include dating methods, ice core studies, palynology, ocean core studies, terrestrial geological and biological studies, dendroclimatology, and historical climatology. Prerequisites: Geo-Sci 354 or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Julie Brigham-Grette

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
47695

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

jbg92@umass.edu
Origin and forms of glaciers; erosional and depositional processes and recognition of erosional and constructional landforms and depositional systems. Pleistocene history of New England, sea level, and isostasy. Field trips by arrangement.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TU 1:00PM 5:00PM

UMass Amherst
47747

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

Origin and forms of glaciers; erosional and depositional processes and recognition of erosional and constructional landforms and depositional systems. Pleistocene history of New England, sea level, and isostasy. Field trips by arrangement.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
47527

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@cns.umass.edu
47608
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
47608

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@cns.umass.edu
47527
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Michael Rawlins

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
47519

Morrill I Room 444

mrawlins@umass.edu
By the completion of this course students will understand the origin, composition, and structure of the atmosphere and oceans. The course is divided into a series of concept modules and associated learning objectives that are observable and measurable. By completion students will have improved their ability to analyze statistical data and gained skills in the interpretation and creation of multivariate graphs. They will be proficient in communicating new research findings on climate variability and change to diverse audiences. This course examines fundamentals of the earth's energy balance, the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, and the hydrological cycle. It explores the physical basis behind climate change and its effects on society.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
47628

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 126

wclement@geo.umass.edu
47650
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
47650

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 126

wclement@geo.umass.edu
47628
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL

M 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
47640

Morrill III Room 108

47639
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LM

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
47641

Morrill III Room 108

47644
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LN

TU 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
47642

Morrill III Room 108

47645
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LQ

W 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
47643

Morrill III Room 108

47646
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LR

TH 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
47652

Morrill III Room 108

47679
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LS

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
47651

Morrill III Room 108

47647
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
55725

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

spetsch@cns.umass.edu
Knowledge gained through study of the geosciences is essential for the future sustainability of life on our planet. This course explores the intersection of geoscience features and processes with several of humankind?s critical needs: the sustained supply of energy, water, soil and mineral resources; the reliance of land- and ocean-based ecosystem services on underlying geoscience systems; and risk mitigation and resilience building in response to natural and human-made hazards. We will examine the current state of the energy-water-climate-food nexus and predictions for its future to improve understanding of the complex linkages between the geosciences and society. We will also practice quantitative characterization of geoscience datasets such as statistical descriptions of data, model design and hypothesis testing, and the limits of predictions and inferences drawn from real-world data.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
47636

Morrill I Room 444

Basic principles governing the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments, with applications for understanding both modern sedimentary environments and preserved sedimentary deposits. Prerequisite: one year of geology; introductory calculus course recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

M 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
47637

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

Basic principles governing the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments, with applications for understanding both modern sedimentary environments and preserved sedimentary deposits. Prerequisite: one year of geology; introductory calculus course recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Isaac Larsen

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
47624

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

ilarsen@umass.edu
Global climate change is a societal issue that affects natural and human systems right now and will continue dramatically impacting them in the future if the drivers remain unabated. The debate and political polarization surrounding climate change issues is all around us and the messages can be confusing and difficult to interpret. It is crucial that as a society we are equipped with the scientific knowledge and skills to interpret the collected information, make decisions about and prepare for and mitigate the impacts of a changing climate. In this course, students take advantage of the breadth of their shared experiences in the Geosciences Department from human dimensions to physical sciences, drawing from geography, earth systems science and geology. The platform of the course examines the most pressing problem within Earth Sciences, anthropogenic climate change, incorporating the themes of Water, Air, Energy, and Sustainability.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Fall 2022 CMS Courses: RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, POLICY, and SCIENTIFIC SKILLS

01
4.00

Ashwin J. Ravikumar

TTH 02:30 PM-03:50 PM

Amherst College
ENST-250-01-2223F
aravikumar@amherst.edu

This course is built around core readings on key policies and agencies of environmental governance in the US. It will provide students with a strong grasp of the most important environmental legislation in the United States (such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Clean Air Act). We will explore how existing environmental laws and institutions have provided important environmental protections, and also where they have fallen short. We will also ask how environmental racism and other forms of inequality have been addressed or exacerbated by historical policies, with an eye towards identifying promising alternatives in the future. Students will examine the relationships between local, state, and federal agencies carrying out environmental governance. This class will explore how policy is "political," and how it emerges from the actions of competing interest groups.

Pre-requisite: ENST-120.  Fall 2022. Professor Ravikumar.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Theodore Gilliland

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
118570
tgillila@mtholyoke.edu
Understanding and solving environmental problems requires interdisciplinary perspectives. This course links tools from economics with tools from ecology and environmental sciences to design effective policies for protecting the environment. We will examine topics such as the protection of rare and endangered species, rainforest conservation, climate change and others. We will also study important domestic and international policies related to these topics.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Catherine Corson

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118375
ccorson@mtholyoke.edu
This course will explore the historical, political, economic, social, and cultural contexts in which human-environment interactions occur. We will cover critical topics and trends in the field of political ecology, from its early manifestations to more recent expansions. Using case studies from the global south and north, we will discuss factors that shape social and environmental change across scales from the personal to the global, and we will examine the role of gender, race, class, and power in struggles over resources. Students will become familiar with the academic debates in which political ecologists are engaged, and they will apply the concepts discussed in a case of their choice.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Catherine Corson

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
118376
ccorson@mtholyoke.edu
This course will explore the historical, political, economic, social, and cultural contexts in which human-environment interactions occur. We will cover critical topics and trends in the field of political ecology, from its early manifestations to more recent expansions. Using case studies from the global south and north, we will discuss factors that shape social and environmental change across scales from the personal to the global, and we will examine the role of gender, race, class, and power in struggles over resources. Students will become familiar with the academic debates in which political ecologists are engaged, and they will apply the concepts discussed in a case of their choice.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Thomas Millette

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118382
tmillett@mtholyoke.edu
Provides a comprehensive introduction to maps, including their design, compilation, and computer production. Introduces students to the principles of abstracting the Earth's surface into spatial databases using GIS, remote sensing, and Global Positioning Satellites.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andy Reiter

TTH 09:00AM-10:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
118035
areiter@mtholyoke.edu
This course presents international norms and institutions for regulating conflict, including promoting economic well-being, protecting human rights, exploring and using outer space, and controlling exploitation and pollution of the oceans. The course considers international agreements, problems of lawmaking, interpretation, and compliance; nationality and the status of foreigners and their investments; the principle of self-determination; and interests of postcolonial states as they impinge on the international legal order.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gunjan Sharma

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ECO-224-01-202301
gsharma@smith.edu
The economic causes of environmental degradation and the role that markets can play in both causing and solving pollution and resource allocation problems. Topics include resource allocation and sustainability, cost-benefit analysis, pollution standards, taxes, and permits, public goods and common property resources. Prerequisite: ECO 150.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jack Loveless

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ENV-150-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 104

jloveles@smith.edu
GEO 150-01, ENV 150-01
Offered as GEO 150 and ENV 150. A geographic information system (GIS) enables data and maps to be overlain, queried and visualized in order to solve problems in many diverse fields. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS and applies the analysis of spatial data to issues in geoscience, environmental science and public policy. Students gain expertise in ArcGIS--the industry standard GIS software--and online mapping platforms, and carry out semester-long projects in partnership with local conservation organizations. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jack Loveless

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-150-01-202301

Sabin-Reed 104

jloveles@smith.edu
GEO 150-01, ENV 150-01
Offered as GEO 150 and ENV 150. A geographic information system (GIS) enables data and maps to be overlain, queried and visualized in order to solve problems in many diverse fields. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS and applies the analysis of spatial data to issues in geoscience, environmental science and public policy. Students gain expertise in ArcGIS--the industry standard GIS software--and online mapping platforms, and carry out semester-long projects in partnership with local conservation organizations. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Juan-Camilo Cardenas

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
45413

Ag. Engineering Bldg rm 119

juancamilo@umass.edu
Application of the theories of political economy to environmental problems and issues. Topics include regulatory and market approaches to pollution and natural resource depletion; cost-benefit analysis and its economic and political foundations; and case studies of specific environmental problems such as acid rain, deforestation, and global warming.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Eric Thomas

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
47607

Hasbrouck Room 236

ehthomas@umass.edu
Introduction to human geography perspectives on the historical transformation of the earth and current environmental issues. Political ecology explores the diverse, complex spatially and temporally variable, multi-scale and often place/region specific politics, political economy, and socio-cultural dynamics of environmental change and conservation. Special attention to communities, Indigenous peoples, women, environmental and social justice movements, and contested "development" and conservation initiatives. Course case studies analyze political ecologies of diverse world regions and historical eras.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
47539

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

47540
This course introduces the principles of digital image analysis for interpreting remotely sensed data for environmental, resource and urban studies. Emphasis will be given to the processing and information extraction from optical and thermal imagery.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TU 2:30PM 4:30PM

UMass Amherst
47555

Morrill III Room 212

47556
This course introduces the principles of digital image analysis for interpreting remotely sensed data for environmental, resource and urban studies. Emphasis will be given to the processing and information extraction from optical and thermal imagery.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Anne Averill

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
51458

Holdsworth Hall room 312A

averill@eco.umass.edu
How does an understanding of behaviors and their adaptive significance contribute to conservation of an animal species? We will focus on fundamentals of animal behavior and review studies where the application of animal behavior is relevant in wildlife protection. We will see how theory and data gathered through traditional and new techniques in animal behavior and behavioral ecology can be used to understand the impact of ongoing anthropogenic threats. Class time will be used to discuss textbook chapters and scientific papers and to present team projects. We will review the research process with a focus on honing the skills required to garner background information, to pose clear questions and state hypotheses, and to imagine the methods and type of data generated to test the hypotheses.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Timothy Randhir

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
51454

Holdsworth Hall room 308

randhir@eco.umass.edu
Water is one of the basic elements needed for life systems to exist and survive. While it is abundant in supply, it is not always available where it is needed. This course will cover concepts and issues related to managing water resources through regional and global ecosystem perspectives.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Forrest Bowlick

TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
51412

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

fbowlick@umass.edu
47552,52819,54671
This class serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Science (GIS). GIS is the science of spatial relationships, linking data to locations to explore relations between objects. Based in geographic thought and emerging from initial applications in natural resource management, GIS has evolved to be a universally applicable way of thinking and set of knowledge, skills, and practices. The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts through practice and theory, to enable you to make useful and meaningful contributions to various disciplines through spatial analysis. Throughout this course, you will be challenged to not only think spatially, but apply spatial analysis techniques within GIS.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
51409

Morrill III Room 212

47579,52812,56036
This class serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Science (GIS). GIS is the science of spatial relationships, linking data to locations to explore relations between objects. Based in geographic thought and emerging from initial applications in natural resource management, GIS has evolved to be a universally applicable way of thinking and set of knowledge, skills, and practices. The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts through practice and theory, to enable you to make useful and meaningful contributions to various disciplines through spatial analysis. Throughout this course, you will be challenged to not only think spatially, but apply spatial analysis techniques within GIS.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

F 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
51411

Morrill III Room 212

47580
This class serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Science (GIS). GIS is the science of spatial relationships, linking data to locations to explore relations between objects. Based in geographic thought and emerging from initial applications in natural resource management, GIS has evolved to be a universally applicable way of thinking and set of knowledge, skills, and practices. The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts through practice and theory, to enable you to make useful and meaningful contributions to various disciplines through spatial analysis. Throughout this course, you will be challenged to not only think spatially, but apply spatial analysis techniques within GIS.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
51467

Morrill III Room 212

47577
This class serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Science (GIS). GIS is the science of spatial relationships, linking data to locations to explore relations between objects. Based in geographic thought and emerging from initial applications in natural resource management, GIS has evolved to be a universally applicable way of thinking and set of knowledge, skills, and practices. The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts through practice and theory, to enable you to make useful and meaningful contributions to various disciplines through spatial analysis. Throughout this course, you will be challenged to not only think spatially, but apply spatial analysis techniques within GIS.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

John Stranlund

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
52949

Integ. Learning Center S331

stranlund@resecon.umass.edu
Economic analysis of natural resource use and conservation. Includes analyses of the use of fuel, forest, marine and biodiversity resources. Focuses on evaluating natural resource use in terms of efficiency and sustainability, and designing regulations for correcting inefficient and unsustainable resource markets. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Internships

Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Internship Program
Funded by the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program. Only Five College students are eligible (Amherst, Mount Holyoke, Hampshire, and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts Amherst).  Graduating seniors and graduate students are not eligible.
The 2021 Internship Program application is now available.
 

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs)

Nationwide search for paid internships in ocean science (and many other science fields), Funded by the National Science Foundation. Stipends and application deadlines/procedures vary (some as early as January for the following summer). NSF updates deadlines and adds opportunities as they become available. Most of these are limited to undergraduates who are permamnent US residents or citizens.
Hint: If deadlines are out-of-date, click on link to individual REU programs. The individual program websites are more likely to be current.

Texas A&M Ocean and Coastal Resource REU
Due February 15th each year

Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, Massachusetts

REU for rising sophomores and juniors.
Due February 15th each year (priority)
        March 10th each year (final)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Summer student fellowships for guided research (only juniors may apply).
Due February 15th each year.

UMass-Dartmouth
School for Marine Science and Technology

Coverletter and resume required,
no application or due date posted.

Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, ME
Due February 15th each year

Ocean Exploration Trust
Internships in ocean science, seafloor mapping, ROV engineering and vieo engineering/filmmaking.
Due January 20th each year.

Institute for Broadening Participation:
Pathways to Science

A compilation of coastal and marine research, outreach, and educational opportunities for undergraduates and graduates (you can also search other disciplines). Stipends and application deadlines/procedures vary (some as early as January). Please note that only research internship field hours can be applied towards the certificate.

Marine Mammal Behavior and Cognition Laboratory
University of Southern Mississippi. Fall and spring volunteer internships available.
Due May 1 and November 1

Institute for Marine Mammal Studies
Gulfport, Mississippi
Due November 1, March 1, and June 1 for following season

Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute
Florida Atlantic University (FAU)
Known for its research in marine science and biomedicine, aquaculture and ocean engineering, Harbor Branch-FAU is located between Vero Beach and Fort Pierce, Florida, on the Indian River Lagoon, one of the most biodiverse estuaries in the United States.
Due March 1st each year.

Seabird & Shorebird Internships/Jobs
Many internships and paid field positions in the Northeast and nationwide, posted in weekly compilations (search on "birdjobs").  Applications and due dates vary by posting.

Texas A & M Job Board
Too many great opportunities to list: marine mammals, birds, fisheries, sea turtles, etc. Worth a look.

Green Dream Jobs
Find jobs/internships nationwide. There are usually a few marine science postings.

Seabird & Shorebird Internships/Jobs
Many internships and paid field positions in the Northeast and nationwide, posted in weekly compilations (search on "birdjobs"). Listserve available. Applications and due dates vary by posting.

Institute for Broadening Participation:
Pathways to Science

A compilation of coastal & marine research opportunities for undergraduates and graduates (you can also search other disciplines). Stipends and application deadlines/procedures vary (some as early as January for summer).

Ocean Exploration Trust
Internships in ocean science, seafloor mapping, ROV engineering, and vieo engineering/filmmaking. Due January 16, 2015.

Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, Plymouth, MA
Volunteer Internships in marine conservation.
Minimum commitment of 3 months, with the possibility of extended term.
All interns are trained in photo-identification, data-collection and management, identification catalog maintenance, public speaking, and marine mammal policy.
Admission is rolling-early application (January) advised.

Cape Ann Whale Watch and Ocean Alliance, Gloucester, MA
Interns will staff whale watch tours (Humpback, Minke, and Fin Whales)and interact with passengers with hands-on teaching tools such as baleen and whale teeth, a 3-D model of the ocean floor, and plankton collected during the trip. Interns will also collect data on whale sighting, identification, and weather. naturalist training will be provided. Group housing is available at cost. Position is volunteer (minimum 2 months), application is rolling.

Marine Mammal Behavior and Cognition Laboratory,
University of Southern Mississippi. Fall and spring volunteer internships available.
Due May 1st and November 1st

Humpback Whale Internship with the Alaska Whale Foundation's Rapunzel Project 

Nationwide

Western USA (AK, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WA, WY)

Southeastern USA (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV)

NORTHEAST USA (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT, DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA)

Midwest USA (IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI)

International

Contact Us

A smiling man with short hair, blue collared shirt, and blue jacket.

Ray Rennard

Director of Academic Programs
Man with red shirt

Andy Danylchuk

Program Director
A smiling woman with shoulder-length brown hair, dark sweater, and a multicolor scarf.

Cindy Bright

Program Coordinator