Coastal & Marine Sciences

Offering an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in the five campuses.

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program offers an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in a Five College campus. The Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is available to students at all five campuses. Through active affiliations with some of the nation's premier centers for marine study (field trips, internships, and study-away programs), students engage in hands-on research to complement course work. Many students who participate in the program go on to advanced study or professional work in various areas of marine science. Five College faculty from both natural and social sciences teach courses in the program. The disciplines represented include animal behavior, biology, botany, chemistry, ecology, engineering, geology, natural resource management, and zoology in the natural sciences, and government, public policy and economics in the social sciences.

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Coastal & Marine Sciences Certificate

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate enables students from the five campuses to select from a wide variety of marine-science-related courses, including coastal and marine ecology/geology, resource management and public policy, oceanography and coastal engineering to create a cohesive concentration. The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is now available to students on all five campuses.

The FCCMS certificate work includes three components:
1) Course work (6 courses)
2) Field and lab work (80 hour minimum)
3) Independent research project/poster

Under the guidance of faculty advisors on each campus, students choose a progressive series of courses available within the five campuses and in approved academic off-campus programs (Sea Education Association, School for Field Studies, Williams-Mystic, Duke University Marine Lab, Shoals Marine Lab, and others). Students are required to gain proficiency in field/lab work through intensive field courses or internships. Finally, students participate in a “capstone” independent, marine-related research project that will count toward the certificate. Students interested in earning the certificate should begin by setting up an introductory meeting with the Program Coordinator (see People). Once students have begun the introductory course of study, they will be appointed a faculty advisor affiliated with Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences who will assist with course selection, research projects and field/lab requirements to ensure a strong concentration in marine sciences.

Student presenting at Five College symposium.
people at controls of ship

People

The program office is located at Five Colleges, Inc., 97 Spring Street in Amherst. Students interested in learning more about the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate or internship program should schedule a meeting with Program Coordinator Cindy Bright, available by appointment on your home campus (see contact info below). Students affiliated with the program receive information on campus lectures, films and events as well as information on internships and research opportunities in the field.

The FCCMS Program is guided by a steering committee with members from each of the five campuses. Steering committee members also serve as faculty advisors to certificate students.

Steering Committee & Faculty Advisors

Alexandra Purdy, Associate Professor of Biology
David Jones, Associate Professor of Geology

Laela Sayigh, Associate Professor of Animal Behavior

Jason Andras, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
Renae Brodie, Professor of Biological Sciences
Al Werner, Professor of Geology

Bosiljka Glumac, Professor of Geosciences
Paulette Peckol, Louise C. Harrington Professor of Biological Sciences

Brian Cheng, Assistant Professor of Environmental Conservation
Andy Danylchuk, Professor of Fish Conservation, Director of Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program
Adrian Jordaan, Associate Professor of Fish Population Ecology and Conservation
Steve Petsch, Associate Professor of Geosciences
Jonathan Woodruff, Associate Professor of Geosciences

Five Colleges, Incorporated (Steering Committee only)
Cindy Bright, Program Coordinator
Ray Rennard, Director of Academic Programs

Courses

A minimum of six courses in three categories is required for the certificate. Check the complete, categorized course list to see which courses are approved for the certificate. This master list may include courses not currently offered. Some courses may have stipulations (like "with marine project only"), or may require prerequisites.

Note: You do not need to be working towards the certificate to take any of these marine-related courses.

Faculty: Please contact marinesci@fivecolleges.edu if you would like to suggest an addition to the FCCMS list. Include the course number, title, semester(s) offered, and its relevance to marine science.

Other courses in addition to those listed here may be eligible for fulfilling the requirements of the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate. Students are encouraged to consult a Coastal and Marine Sciences Program campus advisor to identify courses that are appropriate for their interests.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, POLICY, and SCIENTIFIC SKILLS

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116782
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
The statistics sections of biology articles have become so technical and jargon-filled that many biologists feel intimidated into skipping them or blindly accepting the stated results. But how can we ask relevant questions or push the boundaries of knowledge if we skip these sections? Using lectures, data collection, and hands-on analysis in R, this course will connect statistics to biology to help students develop a gut instinct for experimental design and analysis. We will explore sampling bias and data visualization and review methods and assumptions for the most common approaches with examples from current biological literature and our own data.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Justin Baumann

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116783
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

02
0.00

Justin Baumann

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116784
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Andy Reiter

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116820
areiter@mtholyoke.edu
This course presents international norms and institutions for regulating conflict, including promoting economic well-being, protecting human rights, exploring and using outer space, and controlling exploitation and pollution of the oceans. The course considers international agreements, problems of lawmaking, interpretation, and compliance; nationality and the status of foreigners and their investments; the principle of self-determination; and interests of postcolonial states as they impinge on the international legal order.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Robert Darrow

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
117131
rdarrow@mtholyoke.edu
Environmental concerns are no longer a niche "special interest" in American politics. Today multiplying and intensifying ecological crises are getting harder to ignore, and the need for action is urgent. Deciding how to respond to and govern a climate-changed world is now one of the defining political challenges of our time. This course examines the history of environmental debates in the United States, the diverse range of actors and organizations participating in these debates, current laws and institutions regulating Americans' relationships with their environments at both the federal and state levels, and the processes for making and implementing public policy for the environment.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kye Barker

TU 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GOV-367et-01-202203
kbarker@smith.edu
What is the political significance of nature? In this seminar we shall engage this question through a critical analysis of readings in classic and contemporary environmental political thought with special emphasis on the political relationship between human beings and nature. Topics to be considered include wilderness conservation, political ecology, environmental justice, and more. The question which emerges through these readings, which is in the background of the entire course, is whether we might find a democratic and just response to the challenges of the climate crisis. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Qian Yu

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
29994

Morrill III Room 212

qyu@geo.umass.edu
29995
This course introduces fundamental concepts and methods of geographic information system. Emphasis on developing skills using GIS to solve typical spatial problems in the geosciences and environmental sciences.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Qian Yu

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
29995

Morrill III Room 212

qyu@geo.umass.edu
29994
Introduce the concepts and principles of GIS. Both theoretical and applied realms of GIS are emphasized in this course. Some important spatial analysis topics in GIS are also included.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kristina Stinson

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
33251

Holdsworth Hall room 211

kstinson@eco.umass.edu
Restoration ecology is the returning of damaged ecosystems or particular properties of a desired state of ecological health. For purposes of this course, this field can be divided into four topics: 1) remediation of damaged sites where no return to original conditions is possible (e.g. strip-mined sites), 2) restoration of missing natural processes (fire, flood cycles, etc.), 3) return of missing native species or protection of declining native species, and 4) elimination or management of damaging invasive species. Skills for preparation of goals and implementation plans for individual sites will be developed. At the landscape level, knowledge of wildlife restoration, as well as use of tools for management of damaging invasive species (including especially the role of biological control) will be explored.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Timothy Randhir

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
33258

Holdsworth Hall room 308

randhir@eco.umass.edu
Course covers watershed-scale and ecosystem-based approaches to natural resources conservation and environmental decisions. Students will learn various approaches and fundamental concepts for integrating biological, physical, hydrological, and socioeconomics with a trans-disciplinary perspective.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bethany Bradley

TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
33220

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

bbradley@eco.umass.edu
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

F 10:10AM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
33237

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

F 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
33243

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LN

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
33283

Morrill III Room 212

The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

John Stranlund

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
34856

Thompson Hall room 106

stranlund@resecon.umass.edu
Economic analysis of environmental problems focusing on air, water, and land pollution. Emphasis is on analyzing the individual incentives that lead to environmental degradation, the valuation of environmental quality, and the design and evaluation of regulations that seek to improve environmental quality. Includes the economic analysis of global climate change. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: GEOLOGY and CHEMISTRY

01
4.00

Anna M. Martini

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM

Amherst College
ENST-301-01-2122S
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301-01, ENST-301-01

(Offered as GEOL 301 and ENST 301) As the global human population expands in a future marked by climate change, the search for and preservation of our most vital resource, water, will demand thoughtful policy and greater scientific understanding. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology, geochemistry, and management for natural systems and human needs. Lectures will focus on understanding the hydrologic cycle, how water flows over and within the earth, and the many ways in which this water is threatened by contamination and overuse. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The laboratory will be centered around on-going local issues concerning use and restoration of the Fort River watershed.

Requisite: GEOL 109 or 111 or consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Martini.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Anna M. Martini

TH 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
ENST-301L-01-2122S
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301L-01, ENST-301L-01

01
4.00

David S. Jones

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-105-01-2122S
djones@amherst.edu

The global ocean is one of the defining features of our planet’s surface. It regulates weather patterns, sculpts the coasts of the continents, and contains records of the past 200 million years of earth's climate in sediment on the seafloor. In this course we will develop an understanding of the global marine system through study of its interconnected geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes. These fundamental principles include seafloor spreading, the transport of heat from the equator to the poles, and cycling of nutrients and organic matter by plankton. We will address how the ocean has evolved over the planet’s history, from changes in its circulation brought on by shifting continental configurations and climate fluctuations to its chemical responses to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The course will conclude with scientifically informed considerations of some of the challenges humanity faces in deciding how to use the ocean and its resources. Three class hours per week.

Not open to students who have taken GEOL 112 or 121. Limited to 60 students. Fifteen seats reserved for first-year students. Associate Professor Jones.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Nicholas D. Holschuh, David S. Jones

MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-112-01-2122S
nholschuh@amherst.edu djones@amherst.edu

For at least 3.5 billion years, Earth’s surface environments have supported some form of life. What geologic processes first created and subsequently maintained a habitable environment? How does contemporary global climate change compare to climate variations over Earth’s long history? This course looks at Earth’s climate and its surface environment from a geologist’s perspective. We will develop an understanding of the atmospheric, oceanographic, geological, and biological systems that interact to modulate the climate. Because Earth’s surface environments are products of and participants in these systems, we will also build the skills necessary to observe and interpret the landscape through study of modern coastal and riverine processes in the context of our region’s glacial history. Exploration of the sedimentary rock record, in which evidence of the history of ancient climate and life is preserved, will inform our inquiry into the ongoing climate experiment humanity is running through the rapid release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The scientific tools we develop will allow us to analyze predictions of future climate change and assess possible paths forward.

This is an introductory science course designed for all students of the college. It provides a foundation for further study of Earth’s climate and surface environments. Three hours of class and two hours of lab. Not open to students who have taken GEOL-121.

Limited to 40 students with 20 students per lab. Spring semester. Professor Jones and Assistant Professor Holschuh.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Nicholas D. Holschuh, David S. Jones

TH 02:30 PM-04:30 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-112L-01-2122S
nholschuh@amherst.edu djones@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Anna M. Martini

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM

Amherst College
GEOL-301-01-2122S
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301-01, ENST-301-01

(Offered as GEOL 301 and ENST 301) As the global human population expands in a future marked by climate change, the search for and preservation of our most vital resource, water, will demand thoughtful policy and greater scientific understanding. This course is an introduction to surface and groundwater hydrology, geochemistry, and management for natural systems and human needs. Lectures will focus on understanding the hydrologic cycle, how water flows over and within the earth, and the many ways in which this water is threatened by contamination and overuse. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The laboratory will be centered around on-going local issues concerning use and restoration of the Fort River watershed.

Requisite: GEOL 109 or 111 or consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Martini.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Anna M. Martini

TH 01:00 PM-04:00 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-301L-01-2122S
ammartini@amherst.edu
GEOL-301L-01, ENST-301L-01

01
4.00

Alan Werner

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116481
awerner@mtholyoke.edu
Because more than seventy percent of our planet is covered by oceans, the study of marine systems is crucial to our understanding of Earth History and life on the planet. We will examine chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans at a variety of scales in time and space. We will explore how the Earth's oceans formed, how they provided the foundations for life, and how they continue to affect weather and climate, stabilize global chemical cycles, erode coastlines and provide access to resources. We will conclude the semester with a discussion of the human impact on the ocean environment including sea level rise, acidification, coral bleaching and over-fishing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michelle Markley

MW 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116484

Clapp Laboratory 300

mmarkley@mtholyoke.edu
This course explores the evolution and interaction of life, rocks, oceans, and air during the past 4 billion years of earth history. Some topics covered are: the geologic time scale, significant events in earth history, ice ages and greenhouse atmospheres, continental drift, extinctions and radiations of flora and fauna, the geology of the anthropocene, and absolute and relative dating of rocks. Oral presentations and writing assignments focus on the design and testing of earth science hypotheses, critical analysis of recently published research on earth history, and proposal writing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bosiljka Glumac

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-01-202203
bglumac@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Lewis Ward

M 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L01-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Lewis Ward

W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L02-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
5.00

Greg de Wet

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-251-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 103

gdewet@smith.edu
The study of landforms and their significance in terms of the processes that form them. Selected reference is made to examples in the New England region and the classic landforms of the world. During the first part of the semester laboratories involve learning to use geographic information system (GIS) software to analyze landforms. During the second part of the semester laboratories include field trips to examine landforms in the local area. Prerequisite: GEO 101, 102, 108 or FYS 103. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Greg de Wet

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-251-L01-202203

Sabin-Reed 103

gdewet@smith.edu
The study of landforms and their significance in terms of the processes that form them. Selected reference is made to examples in the New England region and the classic landforms of the world. During the first part of the semester laboratories involve learning to use geographic information system (GIS) software to analyze landforms. During the second part of the semester laboratories include field trips to examine landforms in the local area. Prerequisite: GEO 101, 102, 108 or FYS 103. Enrollment limited to 18.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
30210

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 245

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This upper level undergraduate and graduate course discusses governing processes in the coastal zone including sea level change, tides, waves, storms, flooding, estuarine dynamics and dynamic coastal landforms (e.g. beaches, marshes, deltas, etc.). Student are taught common computer coding techniques to analyze modern tide gauge, wave buoy, stream flow, and other instrumental observations from coastal, estuarine and coastal river environments. While the focus is on coastal processes, the course teaches common techniques in coding and time series analysis via Matlab that could be applied to a broad suite of problems and environments (e.g. extreme value theory, harmonic & spectral analysis, etc.). Familiarity with some basic computer coding is ideal but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30006

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
30084
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30084

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
30006
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30086

Goessmann Lab. Add rm 64

wclement@geo.umass.edu
30100
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
30100

Goessmann Lab. Add rm 64

wclement@geo.umass.edu
30086
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL

M 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30092

Morrill III Room 108

30088
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LM

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30093

Morrill III Room 108

30089
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LN

TH 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
30094

Morrill III Room 108

30090
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LQ

W 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30095

Morrill III Room 108

30091
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LR

TU 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30096

Morrill III Room 108

30097
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LS

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
30146

Morrill III Room 108

38228
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Martin Medina Elizalde

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30087

Integ. Learning Center N151

mmedinaeliza@umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

R Leckie

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
30101

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

R Leckie

W 1:25PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30102

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

R Leckie

F 1:25PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30103

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

mleckie@geo.umass.edu
A required lab course for Geology and Earth Systems majors. This laboratory course is intended to be complementary with the content provided in Geol 394LI-Earth History: Life, Climate and Environment, and typically will be taken during the same semester as Geol 394LI. It is designed to give students valuable hands-on learning experiences with sedimentary rocks, stratigraphy, and paleontology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
30139

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
Not available at this time
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: ECOLOGY and BIODIVERSITY

01
4.00

Jill S. Miller

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-320-01-2122S
jsmiller@amherst.edu

Evolution is a powerful and central theme that unifies the life sciences. In this course, emphasis is placed on microevolutionary mechanisms of change, and their connection to large-scale macroevolutionary patterns and diversity. Through lectures and readings from the primary literature, we will study genetic drift and gene flow, natural selection and adaptation, molecular evolution, speciation, the evolution of sex and sexual selection, life history evolution, and inference and interpretation of evolutionary relationships. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion each week.

Requisite: BIOL 181; BIOL 191 recommended. Limited to 30 students. Not open to first-year students. Spring semester. Professor Miller

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Jill S. Miller

T 12:51 PM-01:40 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-320F-01-2122S
jsmiller@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Ethan D. Clotfelter, Rachel A. Levin

TH 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
BIOL-454-01-2122S
edclotfelter@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

Most biodiversity on our planet can be found in tropical latitudes. Tropical rainforests, for example, which account for less than 10% of the Earth’s surface, may contain 50-75% of all plant and animal species. In this course we will examine some of the myriad biotic interactions that occur in the tropics using an ecological, evolutionary, and behavioral approach. The course is divided into two main components: a two-week interterm field course and an advanced seminar. During the field course students will be immersed in the tropical forests of Costa Rica, with a focus on organismal identification and comparisons between three sites (lowland Caribbean rainforest, cloud forest, and coastal dry forest). While in Costa Rica, we will utilize the expertise of local specialists to learn more about taxonomic groups that are particularly significant in the tropics, such as bats, frogs, and epiphytic plants. Back on campus, students will analyze tree diversity data collected in the field, as well as focus on a specific topic within tropical biology, around which students will design experimental research that will be presented in an NSF-style grant proposal. Three hours per week.

Requisite: BIOL 181 or ENST 200. Recommended: one or more of the following courses: BIOL 230/ENST 210, BIOL 201, BIOL 280/281, BIOL 320/321. Not open to first-year students. Limited to 12 students. Admission with consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Clotfelter and Senior Lecturer Levin.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

1
4.00

Steve Roof

09:00AM-10:20AM TU;09:00AM-10:20AM TH

Hampshire College
334526

Cole Science Center 333;Cole Science Center 333

srNS@hampshire.edu
Humans are recent tenants on an ancient Earth. Understanding Earth's remarkable history is enlightening yet humbling. Earth's history provides a critical lens for evaluating the environmental processes occurring in our modern world. In this course, we will travel through time to study the evolution of Earth from its fiery beginning over 4.5 billion years ago to the present day. We will explore the physical and biological evolution of Earth and gain an appreciation for Earth as a series of complex systems that interact dynamically and holistically. We will also learn how geologists reconstruct Earth history as well as predict the future. This course will be valuable for anyone who is curious about geology, life, and evolution and is concerned about the future of Earth and its tenants. Keywords: geology, earth, environment, evolution, sustainability
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jason Andras

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116714
jandras@mtholyoke.edu
Evolution is central to our understanding of Biology; it helps us explain both the diversity and commonality in organismal form, function and behavior that have been generated over 3 billion years of life on Earth. We will discuss the mechanisms of evolution within populations and between species, examine some branches of the tree of life and learn how the tree is generated, discuss how phenotypes arise from genotypes and interactions with the environment, and how development is central to understanding evolution. Some themes include the evolution of symbiosis, sex, and human evolution, as well as the crucial role that evolutionary principles play in society including agriculture, medicine, and even the judicial system.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Molly McCutcheon

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116715

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

03
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Jason Andras

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116717

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edujandras@mtholyoke.edu

04
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Jason Andras

F 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116718

Clapp Laboratory 213

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edujandras@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117113
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
Coral reefs are among the most diverse and important ecosystems in the world's oceans. Yet they face a multitude of stressors leading to their decline in both structure and function -- including ocean warming, acidification, coastal development, and land-use change. This course provides a detailed exploration of coral reef ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry including reading, interpreting, and analyzing of primary literature. Building upon previous research we will work to understand the state of the world's reefs and evaluate possible solutions to the interacting stressors that imperil coral reefs in the modern world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kate Ballantine

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116441
kballant@mtholyoke.edu
Although they cover ~0.6% of the earth's surface, wetlands perform more ecosystem services per hectare than any other ecosystem type. Alarmingly, over half of the earth's wetlands have been lost to agriculture and development. With these wetlands were also lost the valuable ecosystem functions wetlands perform. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the biogeochemical, ecological, societal, and regulatory aspects of wetland ecosystems. Group discussion of primary scientific literature, as well as independent experimental design and the writing of a research proposal are core components. Field trips will sometimes keep us until 5:05 pm, and will provide an opportunity to explore these fascinating ecosystems in person.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-130-01-202203
ppeckol@smith.edu
Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

M 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-02-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

W 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-03-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

04
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-04-202203

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite but is not required. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

L. David Smith

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
BIO-260-01-202203
ldsmith@smith.edu
Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, invertebrates are vital members of ecological communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. This course surveys the extraordinary diversity and importance of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Corequisite: BIO 261. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

L. David Smith

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-261-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 201

ldsmith@smith.edu
This laboratory examines relationships between invertebrate form and function and compares diversity within and among major body plans using live and preserved material. Students observe and document invertebrate structure, life cycles, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. Corequisite: BIO 260. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Laura Aline Katz

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-370-01-202203
lkatz@smith.edu
This course focuses on the origin and diversification of microorganisms, with emphasis on eukaryotic lineages. The first weeks of lecture cover the origin of life on Earth, and the diversification of bacteria and archaea. From there, we focus on the diversification of eukaryotes, examining the many innovations that mark some of the major clades of eukaryotes. Evaluation is based on a combination of class participation, short writings and an independent research paper. Prerequisite: BIO 230 or 232 or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 371) is strongly recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Laura Aline Katz

TU 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-371-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 314

lkatz@smith.edu
This research-based lab allows students to explore the eukaryotic microbiomes associated with various environments on campus, including the greenshouse and marine aquaria. Students in the course will master the basics of light microscopy, PCR, and analyses of high-throughput sequencing data. Students will also use the scanning electron microscope to survey their communities. The work in the course culminates in a poster presentation on the discoveries of the sememster. A one-hour weekly lab meeting is scheduled in addition to the three-hour lab period. Corequisite: BIO 370. Enrollment limited to 18. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-390cr-01-202203
ppeckol@smith.edu
Coral reefs occupy a small portion of Earth’s surface, but their importance to the marine ecosystem is great. This seminar considers the geologic importance and ecological interactions of coral reefs. We focus on the status of coral reefs worldwide, considering effects of environmental and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., major storms, eutrophication, acidification, overfishing). Methods for reef conservation are examined. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Adam Porter

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
26625

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

aporter@bio.umass.edu
We will investigate the process of biological evolution and the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Topics to be covered include natural selection, speciation (the formation of new species), and other causes of evolutionary change; the methods that evolutionary biologists use to investigate evolutionary processes and history; and an overview of life's history, focusing on major evolutionary innovations and transitions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Norman Johnson

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
26627

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

njohnson@ent.umass.edu
The scope of ecology; how organisms cope with environmental challenges; population dynamics; species interactions of competition, predation, and mutualism; community ecology; biodiversity; biogeochemical cycles; selected topics in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. Basic concepts related to practical applications in harvesting, biological control, conservation, pollution, and global change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Akiko Okusu

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26767

Morrill 2 Room 319

aokusu@umass.edu
This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26781

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 8:15AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
26782

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bruce Byers

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
26633

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 203

bbyers@cns.umass.edu
Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

W 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26634

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 206

Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
26635

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 206

Avian systematics, phylogeny, behavior, ecology, etc. Lab includes bird identification, anatomy, censusing, field studies. Prerequisite: upper-level biology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rosa Moscarella

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
26654

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

rmoscarella@umass.edu
With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

Katherine Doyle

W 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
26655

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

kdoyle@umass.edu
With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
26656

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LN

TH 8:30AM 11:30AM

UMass Amherst
26657

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LQ

W 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26736

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (III) rm 204

With lab. Lectures and readings on comparative biology and evolutionary relationships of mammalian groups. Lab involves detailed introduction to the New England mammalian fauna and study of selected representatives of other groups, emphasizing adaptation. Prerequisite: any life science course beyond the introductory level.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Peter Houlihan

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
26636

Morrill 2 Room 319

peteh@bio.umass.edu
Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TU 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26677

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

M 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
26678

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

James Holden

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36503

Morrill 2 Room 319

jholden@microbio.umass.edu
Over 70% of the Earth?s surface is covered with the oceans, and nearly all of the life within the ocean is microscopic. Some of these microbes are photosynthetic and form most of the base of the marine food web. These in turn are consumed by other small creatures that eventually provide food for the larger animals in the sea. Bacteria are responsible for maintaining certain chemical balances in the oceans, and themselves are food for other microbes. Understanding how life is sustained in our oceans is vital for coastal human populations that rely on the sea for food. Other people turn to marine microbes for new biotechnologies, or hope that by understanding them we might understand our own planet?s climate history and how marine microbes will respond to global warming and ocean acidification. Satisfies one of the three required modules for the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-MicBio or BS-MicBio majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Lisa Komoroske,Kelly Klingler

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
33242

Holdsworth Hall room 105

lkomoroske@umass.edukklingler@umass.edu
This course provides the evolutionary basis for understanding biological problems in conservation. Evolutionary thinking provides more comprehensive approaches to conservation biology and future conservation practitioners must be equipped with the ability to think about conservation from an evolutionary perspective. Major topics will include: (1) a survey of evolutionary theory; (2) the application of evolutionary thinking to case studies and problems in conservation biology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 CMS courses: BOLD (high marine concentration)

01
4.00

David S. Jones

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
GEOL-105-01-2122S
djones@amherst.edu

The global ocean is one of the defining features of our planet’s surface. It regulates weather patterns, sculpts the coasts of the continents, and contains records of the past 200 million years of earth's climate in sediment on the seafloor. In this course we will develop an understanding of the global marine system through study of its interconnected geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes. These fundamental principles include seafloor spreading, the transport of heat from the equator to the poles, and cycling of nutrients and organic matter by plankton. We will address how the ocean has evolved over the planet’s history, from changes in its circulation brought on by shifting continental configurations and climate fluctuations to its chemical responses to increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The course will conclude with scientifically informed considerations of some of the challenges humanity faces in deciding how to use the ocean and its resources. Three class hours per week.

Not open to students who have taken GEOL 112 or 121. Limited to 60 students. Fifteen seats reserved for first-year students. Associate Professor Jones.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Justin Baumann

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117113
jbaumann@mtholyoke.edu
Coral reefs are among the most diverse and important ecosystems in the world's oceans. Yet they face a multitude of stressors leading to their decline in both structure and function -- including ocean warming, acidification, coastal development, and land-use change. This course provides a detailed exploration of coral reef ecology, physiology, and biogeochemistry including reading, interpreting, and analyzing of primary literature. Building upon previous research we will work to understand the state of the world's reefs and evaluate possible solutions to the interacting stressors that imperil coral reefs in the modern world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alan Werner

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116481
awerner@mtholyoke.edu
Because more than seventy percent of our planet is covered by oceans, the study of marine systems is crucial to our understanding of Earth History and life on the planet. We will examine chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans at a variety of scales in time and space. We will explore how the Earth's oceans formed, how they provided the foundations for life, and how they continue to affect weather and climate, stabilize global chemical cycles, erode coastlines and provide access to resources. We will conclude the semester with a discussion of the human impact on the ocean environment including sea level rise, acidification, coral bleaching and over-fishing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

L. David Smith

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
BIO-260-01-202203
ldsmith@smith.edu
Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, invertebrates are vital members of ecological communities. They provide protein, important ecosystem services, biomedical and biotechnological products, and aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate populations are threatened by human activities. This course surveys the extraordinary diversity and importance of invertebrates, emphasizing their form and function in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Corequisite: BIO 261. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

L. David Smith

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-261-01-202203

Sabin-Reed 201

ldsmith@smith.edu
This laboratory examines relationships between invertebrate form and function and compares diversity within and among major body plans using live and preserved material. Students observe and document invertebrate structure, life cycles, locomotion, feeding and other behaviors. Corequisite: BIO 260. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-390cr-01-202203
ppeckol@smith.edu
Coral reefs occupy a small portion of Earth’s surface, but their importance to the marine ecosystem is great. This seminar considers the geologic importance and ecological interactions of coral reefs. We focus on the status of coral reefs worldwide, considering effects of environmental and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., major storms, eutrophication, acidification, overfishing). Methods for reef conservation are examined. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bosiljka Glumac

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-01-202203
bglumac@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Lewis Ward

M 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L01-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Lewis Ward

W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
GEO-108-L02-202203

Burton 110

lward15@smith.edu
An introduction to the global marine environment, with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynamics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere-climate interactions and global climate change, coastal processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of marine resources by humans. At least one required field trip.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Akiko Okusu

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
26767

Morrill 2 Room 319

aokusu@umass.edu
This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
26781

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

TH 8:15AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
26782

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 343

This course introduces life in the sea from ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include primary and secondary production, interrelations of marine organisms and their environment (e.g. rocky intertidal, estuaries, interstitial communities, coral reefs, deep-sea communities), adaptations of marine organisms, human impacts on marine life, biodiversity, conservation, and aquaculture. Students will also learn about recent advances in marine research by reading primary literature on topics including reproduction, embryology, paleontology, metazoan body-plan evolution, evolution of development, and phylogeny.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
30210

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 245

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This upper level undergraduate and graduate course discusses governing processes in the coastal zone including sea level change, tides, waves, storms, flooding, estuarine dynamics and dynamic coastal landforms (e.g. beaches, marshes, deltas, etc.). Student are taught common computer coding techniques to analyze modern tide gauge, wave buoy, stream flow, and other instrumental observations from coastal, estuarine and coastal river environments. While the focus is on coastal processes, the course teaches common techniques in coding and time series analysis via Matlab that could be applied to a broad suite of problems and environments (e.g. extreme value theory, harmonic & spectral analysis, etc.). Familiarity with some basic computer coding is ideal but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Martin Medina Elizalde

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
30087

Integ. Learning Center N151

mmedinaeliza@umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

James Holden

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
36503

Morrill 2 Room 319

jholden@microbio.umass.edu
Over 70% of the Earth?s surface is covered with the oceans, and nearly all of the life within the ocean is microscopic. Some of these microbes are photosynthetic and form most of the base of the marine food web. These in turn are consumed by other small creatures that eventually provide food for the larger animals in the sea. Bacteria are responsible for maintaining certain chemical balances in the oceans, and themselves are food for other microbes. Understanding how life is sustained in our oceans is vital for coastal human populations that rely on the sea for food. Other people turn to marine microbes for new biotechnologies, or hope that by understanding them we might understand our own planet?s climate history and how marine microbes will respond to global warming and ocean acidification. Satisfies one of the three required modules for the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-MicBio or BS-MicBio majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

A smiling man with short hair, blue collared shirt, and blue jacket.

Ray Rennard

Director of Academic Programs
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Andy Danylchuk

Program Director
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Cindy Bright

Program Coordinator