Coastal & Marine Sciences

Offering an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in the five campuses.

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program offers an interdisciplinary marine-related curriculum to undergraduate students enrolled in a Five College campus. The Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is available to students at all five campuses. Through active affiliations with some of the nation's premier centers for marine study (field trips, internships, and study-away programs), students engage in hands-on research to complement course work. Many students who participate in the program go on to advanced study or professional work in various areas of marine science. Five College faculty from both natural and social sciences teach courses in the program. The disciplines represented include animal behavior, biology, botany, chemistry, ecology, engineering, geology, natural resource management, and zoology in the natural sciences, and government, public policy and economics in the social sciences.

Coastal & Marine Sciences Certificate

The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate enables students from the five campuses to select from a wide variety of marine-science-related courses, including coastal and marine ecology/geology, resource management and public policy, oceanography and coastal engineering to create a cohesive concentration. The Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate is now available to students on all five campuses.

The FCCMS certificate work includes three components:
1) Course work (6 courses)
2) Field and lab work (80 hour minimum)
3) Independent research project/poster

Under the guidance of faculty advisors on each campus, students choose a progressive series of courses available within the five campuses and in approved academic off-campus programs (Sea Education Association, School for Field Studies, Williams-Mystic, Duke University Marine Lab, Shoals Marine Lab, and others). Students are required to gain proficiency in field/lab work through intensive field courses or internships. Finally, students participate in a “capstone” independent, marine-related research project that will count toward the certificate. Students interested in earning the certificate should begin by setting up an introductory meeting with the Program Coordinator (see People). Once students have begun the introductory course of study, they will be appointed a faculty advisor affiliated with Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences who will assist with course selection, research projects and field/lab requirements to ensure a strong concentration in marine sciences.

Student presenting at Five College symposium.
people at controls of ship

People

The program office is located at Five Colleges, Inc., 97 Spring Street in Amherst. Students interested in learning more about the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate or internship program should schedule a meeting with Program Coordinator Cindy Bright, available by appointment on your home campus (see contact info below). Students affiliated with the program receive information on campus lectures, films and events as well as information on internships and research opportunities in the field.

The FCCMS Program is guided by a steering committee with members from each of the five campuses. Steering committee members also serve as faculty advisors to certificate students.

Steering Committee & Faculty Advisors

Alexandra Purdy, Associate Professor of Biology
David Jones, Associate Professor of Geology

Laela Sayigh, Associate Professor of Animal Behavior

Jason Andras, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
Renae Brodie, Professor of Biological Sciences
Al Werner, Professor of Geology

Bosiljka Glumac, Professor of Geosciences
Paulette Peckol, Louise C. Harrington Professor of Biological Sciences

Brian Cheng, Assistant Professor of Environmental Conservation
Andy Danylchuk, Professor of Fish Conservation, Director of Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Program
Adrian Jordaan, Associate Professor of Fish Population Ecology and Conservation
Steve Petsch, Associate Professor of Geosciences
Jonathan Woodruff, Associate Professor of Geosciences

Five Colleges, Incorporated (Steering Committee only)
Cindy Bright, Program Coordinator
Ray Rennard, Director of Academic Programs

Courses

A minimum of six courses in three categories is required for the certificate. Check the complete, categorized course list to see which courses are approved for the certificate. This master list may include courses not currently offered. Some courses may have stipulations (like "with marine project only"), or may require prerequisites.

Note: You do not need to be working towards the certificate to take any of these marine-related courses.

Faculty: Please contact marinesci@fivecolleges.edu if you would like to suggest an addition to the FCCMS list. Include the course number, title, semester(s) offered, and its relevance to marine science.
Other courses in addition to those listed here may be eligible for fulfilling the requirements of the Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate. Students are encouraged to consult a Coastal and Marine Sciences Program campus advisor to identify courses that are appropriate for their interests.

Complete Course List PDF

FALL 2021 BOLD (high marine concentration)

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-268-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 220

ppeckol@smith.edu
The oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, focusing on natural and human-induced factors that affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in marine habitats. Using case studies, we study some successful conservation and management strategies, including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a variety of readings, group activities and short writing assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, graphical and written communication; critical thinking; and problem solving. Enrollment limited to 24. Corequisite: BIO 269.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
2.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-269-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 204

ppeckol@smith.edu
The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

02
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-269-02-202201

Sabin-Reed 204

mcpratt@smith.edu
The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15150

Integ. Learning Center N151

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Jonathan Woodruff

1:00AM 1:00AM

UMass Amherst
23399
woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This will be a one credit reading seminar focused on current topics in oceanography and marine science. Students will read one short paper from the current literature (newspapers, magazines, journals) or one book chapter per week. Topics will be chosen to focus particularly on issues of public interest such as global warming, coastal policy, marine ecology, etc. Students must also be enrolled in Geology 103. Seminars will be devoted to discussing the weekly readings and other topics of current interest. Recommended for first-year students and sophomores.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
18716

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Overview of the biological, sociological, historical, and economic factors that influence the use and conservation of our nation's fisheries resources. Prerequisite: One semester general biology or permission of instructor
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
18750

Holdsworth Hall room 202

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
21977

Ag Eng Bldg Room 102

Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

FALL 2021 ECOLOGY and BIODIVERSITY

01
4.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

Amherst College
BIOL-181-01-2122F

SCCE E110

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

An introduction to the evolution, ecology, and behavior of organisms and how these relate to the diversity of life. Following a discussion of the core components of evolutionary theory, we'll examine how evolutionary processes have shaped morphological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations in organisms that solve many of life's problems, ranging from how to find or acquire food and avoid being eaten, to how to attract and locate mates, and how to optimize reproduction throughout a lifetime. We'll relate and compare characteristics of animals, plants, fungi, protists, and bacteria, examining how and why these organisms have arrived at various solutions to life's problems. Laboratory exercises will complement lectures and will involve field experiments on natural selection and laboratory studies of vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. Four classroom hours and three laboratory hours per week.

Fall semester. Professors Clotfelter and Miller; Lab Coordinator Kristensen.

Please note that the same textbook is used for both BIOL 181 and BIOL 191.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

TH 01:00PM-01:50PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181F-01-2122F

SCCE E108

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

02
0.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

F 01:30PM-02:20PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181F-02-2122F

SCCE A011

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

01
2.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

T 02:30PM-05:30PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-01-2122F

SCCE B119

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

02
2.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

W 02:00PM-05:00PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-02-2122F

SCCE B119

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

03
2.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

TH 08:00AM-11:00AM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-03-2122F

SCCE B119

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

04
2.00

Ethan Clotfelter, Thea Kristensen, Rachel Levin

TH 02:30PM-05:30PM

Amherst College
BIOL-181L-04-2122F

SCCE B119

edclotfelter@amherst.edu tkristensen@amherst.edu rlevin@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Ethan Temeles

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
BIOL-230-01-2122F

SCCE E108

ejtemeles@amherst.edu
BIOL-230-01,ENST-210-01

(Offered as BIOL 230 and ENST 210) A study of the relationships of plants and animals (including humans) to each other and to their environment. We'll start by considering the decisions an individual makes in its daily life concerning its use of resources, such as what to eat and where to live, and whether to defend such resources. We'll then move on to populations of individuals, and investigate species population growth, limits to population growth, and why some species are so successful as to become pests whereas others are on the road to extinction. The next level will address communities, and how interactions among populations, such as competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism, affect the organization and diversity of species within communities. The final stage of the course will focus on ecosystems, and the effects of humans and other organisms on population, community, and global stability. Three hours of lecture per week.

Requisite: BIOL 181 or ENST 120 or equivalent. Limited to 40 students. Fall Semester. Professor Temeles.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Ethan Temeles

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
ENST-210-01-2122F

SCCE E108

ejtemeles@amherst.edu
BIOL-230-01,ENST-210-01

(Offered as BIOL 230 and ENST 210) A study of the relationships of plants and animals (including humans) to each other and to their environment. We'll start by considering the decisions an individual makes in its daily life concerning its use of resources, such as what to eat and where to live, and whether to defend such resources. We'll then move on to populations of individuals, and investigate species population growth, limits to population growth, and why some species are so successful as to become pests whereas others are on the road to extinction. The next level will address communities, and how interactions among populations, such as competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism, affect the organization and diversity of species within communities. The final stage of the course will focus on ecosystems, and the effects of humans and other organisms on population, community, and global stability. Three hours of lecture per week.

Requisite: BIOL 181 or ENST 120 or equivalent. Limited to 40 students. Fall Semester. Professor Temeles.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

1
4.00

Laela Sayigh

01:00PM-03:50PM TH

Hampshire College
333925

Adele Simmons Hall 111

lssCS@hampshire.edu
The traditional view of intelligence ranging from low to high, with humans at the top, has been challenged by research on diverse aspects of animal cognition. Recent studies suggest that cognition takes many different forms in animals and can be very difficult to compare to humans. We will talk about a wide range of animals - including octopuses, crows, dogs, monkeys, apes, dolphins, and whales - from the joint perspectives of cognitive science, animal behavior, and evolutionary biology. We will focus on capacities that have been considered hallmarks of intelligence, such as tool use, mirror self-recognition, innovation, culture, and of course, language. Rather than assessing how human-like these abilities are, we will view these studies with an eye to how each species' intelligence is adapted to its own unique needs. Students will read from the professional scientific literature, and carry out hands-on research projects with animals at the Hampshire Farm. Key Words: behavioral ecology, animal learning, animal consciousness, hands on experiments, farm animals
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Martha Hoopes

MWF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
115496

Clapp Laboratory 016

mhoopes@mtholyoke.edu
This ecology course will cover the fundamental factors controlling the distribution and abundance of organisms, including interactions with the abiotic environment, fitness and natural selection, population growth and dynamics, species interactions, community dynamics, and diversity. We will address variation across space and time. The course will combine observational, experimental, and mathematical approaches to some of the applications of ecological theory, including conservation, disease dynamics, and biological control.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Martha Hoopes,Molly McCutcheon

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115497

Clapp Laboratory 008

mhoopes@mtholyoke.edummccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

02
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Martha Hoopes

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115498

Clapp Laboratory 008

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edumhoopes@mtholyoke.edu

03
0.00

Martha Hoopes,Molly McCutcheon

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115499

Clapp Laboratory 008

mhoopes@mtholyoke.edummccutcheon@mtholyoke.edu

04
0.00

Molly McCutcheon,Martha Hoopes

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115500

Clapp Laboratory 008

mmccutcheon@mtholyoke.edumhoopes@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Renae Brodie

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115604

Clapp Laboratory 422

rbrodie@mtholyoke.edu
In this student-centered project-based course, students will design their own animal behavior investigation and prepare a web-based presentation, teaching module, or manuscript. At the end of the course, students will improve their understanding of basic concepts in behavioral biology and develop a deep understanding of the scientific literature in their area of inquiry. We will work on skills that promote supportive research environments, and explore inclusive approaches to science communication.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jason Andras

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
115512

Kendade 303

jandras@mtholyoke.edu
From mutualism to parasitism, symbiotic interactions are a universal feature of life. In this seminar we will study the mechanisms underlying symbiotic interactions and consider their significance for the ecology and evolution of organisms. Through foundational texts and current scientific literature, we will explore some of the most spectacular and important examples of contemporary symbioses - from infectious diseases to coral reefs, to infectious diseases, to the vast communities of microbes that live on and in our bodies - and we will learn how symbiosis is responsible for major milestones in the history of life, such as the origin of the eukaryotic cell, the emergence of land plants, and the evolution of sex.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Virginia Hayssen

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-130-01-202201

McConnell 103

vhayssen@smith.edu
Students in this course investigate the origin, nature and importance of the diversity of life on Earth; key ecological processes and interactions that create and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle threats to biodiversity; and emerging conservation strategies to protect the elements and processes upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecological studies in conservation. Laboratory (BIO 131) is recommended but not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Denise Lello

M 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 223

dlello@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
2.00

Denise Lello

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-02-202201

Sabin-Reed 223

dlello@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

03
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

W 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-03-202201

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

04
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-131-04-202201

Sabin-Reed 223

mcpratt@smith.edu
Pull on your boots and come explore local habitats that may include the Mill River, MacLeish Field Station, Smith campus Botanic Gardens, and local hemlock forests. Students will gain experience with a diversity of organisms by conducting research projects that can enhance their understanding of ecology and conservation. Students will practice the scientific process and document their work in a lab notebook. Research skills developed will include hypothesis development, data collection, statistical analysis, and presentation of results. Because research projects will vary seasonally, please see the Department of Biological Sciences website for more information. Enrollment limited to 16. BIO 130 is recommended as a prerequisite or corequisite but is not required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Mariana Abarca

M W F 10:50 AM - 11:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-266-01-202201

McConnell 403

mabarca@smith.edu
This general ecology course provides a conceptual foundation for understanding ecological processes from population dynamics to ecosystem function. Fundamental ecological concepts are covered within the context of current environmental challenges arising from global change. This framing illuminates how population dynamics, community composition and trophic interactions affect ecosystem function and ecosystem services. Prerequisites: Bio 130 or an equivalent course in ecology or environmental science.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
1.00

Mariana Abarca

W 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-267-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 328A

mabarca@smith.edu
This general ecology laboratory course provides hands-on experience in the execution of ecological experiments in the field. Students will participate in study design, data curation, analysis, and interpretation. All statistical analyses will be conducted in R. Enrollment limited to 18. Corequisite: BIO 266.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
3.00

Paulette M. Peckol

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
BIO-268-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 220

ppeckol@smith.edu
The oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, focusing on natural and human-induced factors that affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in marine habitats. Using case studies, we study some successful conservation and management strategies, including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a variety of readings, group activities and short writing assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, graphical and written communication; critical thinking; and problem solving. Enrollment limited to 24. Corequisite: BIO 269.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
2.00

Paulette M. Peckol

M 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-269-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 204

ppeckol@smith.edu
The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

02
2.00

Marney C. Pratt

TU 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
BIO-269-02-202201

Sabin-Reed 204

mcpratt@smith.edu
The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture and uses several small-group projects in the field and laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting marine-related research. Students learn to design and analyze experiments, and to write in the scientific style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, Mass., provide hands-on experience with marine organisms in their natural habitats. Corequisite: BIO 268.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
5.00

Sara B. Pruss

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-231-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 103

spruss@smith.edu
A study of the major evolutionary events in the history of life, with a special focus on marine invertebrates. Special topics include evolution, functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, the origin of life, mass extinction and origination, and how life has changed through time. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently; open also to students who have fulfilled the basis for the BIO major.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

L01
0.00

Sara B. Pruss

W 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-231-L01-202201

Sabin-Reed 106

spruss@smith.edu
A study of the major evolutionary events in the history of life, with a special focus on marine invertebrates. Special topics include evolution, functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, the origin of life, mass extinction and origination, and how life has changed through time. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently; open also to students who have fulfilled the basis for the BIO major.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Sara B. Pruss

M 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-231-L02-202201

Sabin-Reed 106

spruss@smith.edu
A study of the major evolutionary events in the history of life, with a special focus on marine invertebrates. Special topics include evolution, functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, the origin of life, mass extinction and origination, and how life has changed through time. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently; open also to students who have fulfilled the basis for the BIO major.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Bruce Byers

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
11153

Integ. Learning Center S211

bbyers@cns.umass.edu
We will investigate the process of biological evolution and the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Topics to be covered include natural selection, speciation (the formation of new species), and other causes of evolutionary change; the methods that evolutionary biologists use to investigate evolutionary processes and history; and an overview of life's history, focusing on major evolutionary innovations and transitions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
3.00

Akiko Okusu

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
11256

Integ. Learning Center S211

aokusu@umass.edu
We will investigate the process of biological evolution and the evolutionary history of life on Earth. Topics to be covered include natural selection, speciation (the formation of new species), and other causes of evolutionary change; the methods that evolutionary biologists use to investigate evolutionary processes and history; and an overview of life's history, focusing on major evolutionary innovations and transitions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Christiane Healey

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
11155

Integ. Learning Center S331

christiane.healey@umass.edu
The scope of ecology; how organisms cope with environmental challenges; population dynamics; species interactions of competition, predation, and mutualism; community ecology; biodiversity; biogeochemical cycles; selected topics in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. Basic concepts related to practical applications in harvesting, biological control, conservation, pollution, and global change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeffrey Podos

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
11182

Morrill 2 Room 319

jpodos@bio.umass.edu
Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

M 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
11226

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM
0.00

W 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
11227

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Elizabeth Jakob

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
11306

Morrill 2 Room 319

ejakob@umass.edu
Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02LL
0.00

TU 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
11307

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02LM
0.00

TH 1:00PM 4:00PM

UMass Amherst
11308

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 339

Our first goal in this course will be to examine the mechanisms that underlie the expression of behavior. For example, how do predators locate prey, how do animals avoid becoming prey, and how do animals navigate through their worlds? To help answer these questions we will apply neurobiological, hormonal, genetic, and developmental perspectives. Our next goal in the course will be to examine the evolutionary bases of behavior, asking for example why animals move, forage, hide, communicate, and socialize as they do. To address these questions we make use of optimality theory and other behavioral ecological perspectives. Other topics in the course will include sexual selection, human behavior, and the role of behavior in establishing biodiversity. With Biology 494LI, this course satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Biol and BS-Biol students. Prerequisite: an introductory biology or psychology course.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Brian Cheng

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
18752

Holdsworth Hall room 105

bscheng@umass.edu
As a species, humans have a remarkable footprint on global ecosystems. We change land cover, alter water and nutrient cycling, introduce non-native species, harvest natural resources, and change the global climate. This class will explore the impacts of these changes on a variety of ecosystems, as well as consider how natural resource management can improve ecological resistance and resilience to change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
18750

Holdsworth Hall room 202

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
21977

Ag Eng Bldg Room 102

Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

FALL 2021 GEOLOGY and CHEMISTRY

01
4.00

Nicholas Holschuh

MWF 10:00AM-10:50AM

Amherst College
GEOL-109-01-2122F

CONV 108

nholschuh@amherst.edu

Humankind is a major agent of environmental change. With each new hurricane, wildfire, and heat wave, public conversations turn to the topic of anthropogenic climate change. But it can be difficult to separate what we know with confidence from what we think we know, and what we are unsure of, given the complex information landscape that defines our moment in time. This leaves many people asking "Is climate change happening? Is it us? Where are we headed? How fast? How do we know?" In this class, we will address these questions directly with a focus on building an interdisciplinary understanding of Earth's climate system. In addition, we will discuss the disparate impacts of climate change on communities around the world, how climate information gets shared between scientists and citizens, and the challenges of building consensus on climate issues.

The internet presents a double-edged sword for climate communication - it is our primary tool for sharing the data and models used to understand Earth's climate, but can be a platform for misinformation and mischaracterization of science for political ends. We will explore this dichotomy in detail, through both the direct download and interpretation of climate data and an evaluation of the way climate change is discussed in the public forum. We will meet three times a week with lecture, small group discussion, and an end goal of producing digital media to share our collective understanding of climate with a broader audience.

Three class meetings per week. This course is open to all students of the College. Limited to 48 students. Fall Semester. Assistant Professor Holschuh. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rachel Bernard, Tekla Harms

MWF 09:00AM-09:50AM

Amherst College
GEOL-111-01-2122F

BEBU 107

rbernard@amherst.edu taharms@amherst.edu

How well do you know the planet on which we live? In this course we will explore Earth from its core to its surface, from the mountains to the deep ocean basins, from the past and present to the future. The earth is an evolving and dynamic system, changing on time scales that range from seconds, to millennia, to eons: volcanos erupt, earthquakes vibrate the globe, continents separate and collide, and mountains rise only to be worn away and rise again. What physical processes drive this dynamism? How does the restless nature of Earth impact our residency? Studying active geologic processes will provide us with a means to decode the history of Earth as written in rocks; analyzing the rock record allows us to test hypotheses about the formation and continual modification of the planet.  With a geologic understanding of your home planet, students will emerge from the course with an expanded notion of what it is to be human. This is a science course designed for all Amherst students.

Three hours of class and two hours of lab in which the student gains direct experience in the science through demonstrations, examination of earth materials, and projects. Lab materials will be provided for remote students.

Limited to 60 students with 20 students per lab. Fall semester: Professor Harms and Assistant Professor Barnard. Spring semester: Professor Crowley.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Rachel Bernard, Tekla Harms

W 01:30PM-03:20PM

Amherst College
GEOL-111L-01-2122F

BEBU 100

rbernard@amherst.edu taharms@amherst.edu

02
0.00

Rachel Bernard, Tekla Harms

TH 08:00AM-09:50AM

Amherst College
GEOL-111L-02-2122F

BEBU 100

rbernard@amherst.edu taharms@amherst.edu

03
0.00

Rachel Bernard, Tekla Harms

T 08:00AM-10:00AM

Amherst College
GEOL-111L-03-2122F

BEBU 100

rbernard@amherst.edu taharms@amherst.edu

01
4.00

Steven Dunn

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115124

Clapp Laboratory 306

sdunn@mtholyoke.edu
The only planet known to sustain life, Earth provides all the resources that sustain us, yet at the same time it can be an unpredictable and sometimes dangerous home. Floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other natural processes challenge our ingenuity, while we also contend with self-induced problems such as pollution, desertification, and even global climate change. This course examines earth processes, how these affect our lives, and how we can best live with and sustain our environment. May be taken for 200-level credit with permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Alan Werner

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
115129

Clapp Laboratory 305

awerner@mtholyoke.edu
The surface of the Earth is a history book of past environmental change. Every hill and valley, every erosional feature and every deposit is the result of processes acting at the Earth's surface. In this course we study these processes (e.g. glaciers, rivers, slopes, coastlines, arid regions, frozen ground, cave formation, soil development and groundwater) to understand how they work and to understand the resulting landforms and deposits. With this understanding we can then observe different landforms and deposits and infer past processes (i.e. environments of deposition). Field work and trips allow students to explore first-hand the processes that have created and modified the Earth's surface.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
0.00

Alan Werner

W 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
115132

Clapp Laboratory 305

awerner@mtholyoke.edu

01
4.00

Cristina Suarez

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
CHM-346-01-202201

Ford 322

csuarez@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

L01
0.00

Mona Kulp

TU 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM

Smith College
CHM-346-L01-202201

Ford 322

mkulp@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L02
0.00

Mona Kulp

TH 1:20 PM - 5:00 PM

Smith College
CHM-346-L02-202201

Ford 322

mkulp@smith.edu
An introduction to some common environmental chemical processes in air, soil and water, coupled with a study of the crucial role of accurate chemical measurement of these processes. Lecture and laboratory featuring modern chemical instrumentation for spectroscopy (atomic and molecular) high performance chromatographic separations (both gas and liquid), electrochemistry as well as microwave- and ultrasound-assisted sample preparation, and a short project linked to local faculty research interests. Oral presentations and formal laboratory reports required. Prerequisite: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Amy Larson Rhodes

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
GEO-101-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 103

arhodes@smith.edu
Geology is a study of the Earth. In this course, we will examine the processes that formed the Earth and that have continued to change the planet during its 4.57 billion year history. In rocks, minerals and the landscape, geologists see puzzles that tell a story about Earth’s past. In this course, you will develop your geologic observation skills. Together, we will investigate the origins of minerals and rocks and the dynamic processes that form volcanoes, cause earthquakes, shape landscapes, create natural resources, and control our climate—today as well as during the Earth’s past. We learn to view the Earth with a new perspective and appreciate how the planet is constantly changing, even if at extremely slow rates. Students planning to major in geosciences should also take GEO 102 concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Greg de Wet

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-104-01-202201

Seelye 106

gdewet@smith.edu
This course seeks to answer the following questions: What do we know about past climate and how do we know it? What causes climate to change? What have been the results of relatively recent climate change on human populations? What is happening today? What is likely to happen in the future? What choices do we have?
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
5.00

Bosiljka Glumac

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-232-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 101

bglumac@smith.edu
A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

L01
0.00

Bosiljka Glumac

TH 1:10 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
GEO-232-L01-202201

Sabin-Reed 101

bglumac@smith.edu
A project-oriented study of the processes and products of sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithification. Modern sediments and depositional environments of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory analyses focus on the description and classification of sedimentary rocks, and on the interpretation of their origin. The results provide unique insights into the geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend field trips. Prerequisite: 101 and 102, or 108, or FYS 103, or 102 with any other GEO 100-level course. 102 can be taken concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jack Loveless

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
GEO-361-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 101

jloveles@smith.edu
A broadly-based examination of tectonics, the unifying theory of geology. We discuss lithospheric plate movements, the creation and destruction of Earth’s crust, the formation of mountain belts and sedimentary basins, the dynamic coupling of crust and mantle, and how these processes have shaped the Earth through time. Emphases includes critical reading of the primary literature; communication of scientific ideas orally and in writing; and the central role of tectonics in uniting diverse fields of geology to create a cogent picture of how the Earth works. Prerequisite: any two 200-level courses in geosciences, one of which may be taken concurrently.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Matthew Winnick

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15268

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

mwinnick@umass.edu
With lab. Chemical processes affecting the distribution and circulation of chemical compounds in natural waters. Geochemistry of precipitation, rivers, lakes, groundwater, and oceans; applications of thermodynamic equilibria to predicting composition of aqueous systems. Behavior of trace metals and radionuclides in near surface environments. Prerequisite: Chem 111, 112.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

TH 11:30AM 2:30PM

UMass Amherst
15269

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (IV) rm N301

With lab. Chemical processes affecting the distribution and circulation of chemical compounds in natural waters. Geochemistry of precipitation, rivers, lakes, groundwater, and oceans; applications of thermodynamic equilibria to predicting composition of aqueous systems. Behavior of trace metals and radionuclides in near surface environments. Prerequisite: Chem 111, 112.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
15066

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
22943
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Steven Petsch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
22943

Thompson Hall room 102

spetsch@geo.umass.edu
15066
The natural relationships between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; human impact on the natural environment. Global environmental issues: global warming, sea-level rise, and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. Global changes of the past also studied to give perspective to forecasted changes. Includes writing exercises. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Francois Lapointe

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15058

Morrill III Room 317

flapointe@umass.edu
By the completion of this course students will understand the origin, composition, and structure of the atmosphere and oceans. The course is divided into a series of concept modules and associated learning objectives that are observable and measurable. By completion students will have improved their ability to analyze statistical data and gained skills in the interpretation and creation of multivariate graphs. They will be proficient in communicating new research findings on climate variability and change to diverse audiences. This course examines fundamentals of the earth's energy balance, the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, and the hydrological cycle. It explores the physical basis behind climate change and its effects on society.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
15151

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

wclement@geo.umass.edu
15174
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

William Clement

M W F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
15174

Hasbrouck Lab Add room 124

wclement@geo.umass.edu
15151
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL
0.00

M 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
15164

Morrill III Room 108

15163
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LM
0.00

TU 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15165

Morrill III Room 108

15168
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LN
0.00

TU 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
15166

Morrill III Room 108

15169
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LQ
0.00

W 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
15167

Morrill III Room 108

15170
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LR
0.00

TH 8:00AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15176

Morrill III Room 108

15203
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LS
0.00

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
15175

Morrill III Room 108

15171
Nature and origin of the earth; volcanism; minerals and rocks; earthquakes; plate tectonics; mountain belts; geologic time scales; wave, river, glacial, and wind action in modification of landscape and atmosphere; the asteroid impact hypotheses; genesis of non-renewable resources, geologic basis for environmental decision making. Field excursions. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Isla Castaneda

TU TH 8:30AM 9:45AM

UMass Amherst
22886

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

isla@geo.umass.edu

01LL
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
22887

Morrill III Room 108

01
4.00

Jonathan Woodruff

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15150

Integ. Learning Center N151

woodruff@cns.umass.edu
The natural processes of the ocean, including earthquakes and volcanoes, the hydrologic cycle and weather, ocean circulation and the global energy balance, the carbon cycle and productivity, biodi-versity and marine food webs, coastal dynamics. Also, global warming, sea-level rise, environmental degradation and the ocean system response to human activity and global change. Interactive class sessions, with considerable participation by students in problem solving, discussions, and demonstrations. Exams and grades based on teamwork as well as on individual performance. Students needing or wanting a laboratory component may register for GEO-SCI 131. (Gen.Ed. PS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Timothy Cook

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
15160

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 129

tcook@geo.umass.edu
Basic principles governing the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments, with applications for understanding both modern sedimentary environments and preserved sedimentary deposits. Prerequisite: one year of geology; introductory calculus course recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

M 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
15161

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

Basic principles governing the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediments, with applications for understanding both modern sedimentary environments and preserved sedimentary deposits. Prerequisite: one year of geology; introductory calculus course recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Jonathan Woodruff

1:00AM 1:00AM

UMass Amherst
23399
woodruff@cns.umass.edu
This will be a one credit reading seminar focused on current topics in oceanography and marine science. Students will read one short paper from the current literature (newspapers, magazines, journals) or one book chapter per week. Topics will be chosen to focus particularly on issues of public interest such as global warming, coastal policy, marine ecology, etc. Students must also be enrolled in Geology 103. Seminars will be devoted to discussing the weekly readings and other topics of current interest. Recommended for first-year students and sophomores.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

FALL 2021 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT and POLICY

01
4.00

Theodore Gilliland

MW 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
115487

Ciruti 109

tgillila@mtholyoke.edu
Understanding and solving environmental problems requires interdisciplinary perspectives. This course links tools from economics with tools from ecology and environmental sciences to design effective policies for protecting the environment. We will examine topics such as the protection of rare and endangered species, rainforest conservation, climate change and others. We will also study important domestic and international policies related to these topics.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Thomas Millette

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115119

Clapp Laboratory 410

tmillett@mtholyoke.edu
Provides a comprehensive introduction to maps, including their design, compilation, and computer production. Introduces students to the principles of abstracting the Earth's surface into spatial databases using GIS, remote sensing, and Global Positioning Satellites.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gunjan Sharma

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
ECO-224-01-202201

Seelye 302

gsharma@smith.edu
The economic causes of environmental degradation and the role that markets can play in both causing and solving pollution and resource allocation problems. Topics include resource allocation and sustainability, cost-benefit analysis, pollution standards, taxes, and permits, public goods and common property resources. Prerequisite: ECO 150.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jack Loveless

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
GEO-150-01-202201

Sabin-Reed 104

jloveles@smith.edu
ENV 150-01, GEO 150-01
Offerred as GEO 150 and ENV 150. A geographic information system (GIS) enables data and maps to be overlain, queried and visualized in order to solve problems in many diverse fields. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS and applies the analysis of spatial data to issues in geoscience, environmental science and public policy. Students gain expertise in ArcGIS — the industry standard GIS software — and online mapping platforms, and carry out semester-long projects in partnership with local conservation organizations and/or campus offices. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
1.00

Toni Morelli,Tina Mozelewski

TU 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
12914

Holdsworth Hall room 306

morelli@umass.edutmozelewski@umass.edu
This seminar will discuss recent and emerging topics of how climate change is impacting fish, wildlife and related natural resources. Students will become familiar with the latest literature and scientific approaches on ecological responses to climate change as well as management, conservation and adaptation strategies being implemented to decrease risk and vulnerability to climate and interactive stressors. Potential topics include climate niche, distribution and occupancy modeling, field surveys, and other techniques used to collect and analyze species responses to changing environmental conditions in terrestrial, aquatic and ocean ecosystems. This is a discussion based class; topics will be selected based on the specific interests of participants.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Juan-Camilo Cardenas

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
13007

Tobin Hall room 304

juancamilo@umass.edu
Application of the theories of political economy to environmental problems and issues. Topics include regulatory and market approaches to pollution and natural resource depletion; cost-benefit analysis and its economic and political foundations; and case studies of specific environmental problems such as acid rain, deforestation, and global warming.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Qian Yu

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15078

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 225

qyu@geo.umass.edu
15079
This course introduces the principles of digital image analysis for interpreting remotely sensed data for environmental, resource and urban studies. Emphasis will be given to the processing and information extraction from optical and thermal imagery.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

TU 2:30PM 4:30PM

UMass Amherst
15094

Morrill III Room 212

15095
This course introduces the principles of digital image analysis for interpreting remotely sensed data for environmental, resource and urban studies. Emphasis will be given to the processing and information extraction from optical and thermal imagery.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Forrest Bowlick

TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
15091

Integ. Learning Center S131

fbowlick@umass.edu
18696,20170,23453

01LL
0.00

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
15116

Morrill III Room 212

18760

01LM
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
15118

Morrill III Room 212

18693,20163,23455

01LN
0.00

F 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
15119

Morrill III Room 212

18695

01
3.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
18716

Morrill Sci. Ctr. (II) rm 131

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Overview of the biological, sociological, historical, and economic factors that influence the use and conservation of our nation's fisheries resources. Prerequisite: One semester general biology or permission of instructor
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Brian Cheng

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
18752

Holdsworth Hall room 105

bscheng@umass.edu
As a species, humans have a remarkable footprint on global ecosystems. We change land cover, alter water and nutrient cycling, introduce non-native species, harvest natural resources, and change the global climate. This class will explore the impacts of these changes on a variety of ecosystems, as well as consider how natural resource management can improve ecological resistance and resilience to change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Andrew Danylchuk

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
18750

Holdsworth Hall room 202

danylchuk@eco.umass.edu
Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
21977

Ag Eng Bldg Room 102

Advanced course that examines the interatctions of fish with their environment. Topics include: feeding adaptations, community trophichs, mating systems, reproductive biology, life history strategies, grwoth dynamics, predator-prey systems, community diversity, and population dynamics. Pre-Requisites: Two semesters biology, one semester ecology or permission of instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Anne Averill

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
18744

Holdsworth 301

averill@eco.umass.edu
How does an understanding of behaviors and their adaptive significance contribute to conservation of an animal species? We will focus on fundamentals of animal behavior and review studies where the application of animal behavior is relevant in wildlife protection. We will see how theory and data gathered through traditional and new techniques in animal behavior and behavioral ecology can be used to understand the impact of ongoing anthropogenic threats. Class time will be used to discuss textbook chapters and scientific papers and to present team projects. We will review the research process with a focus on honing the skills required to garner background information, to pose clear questions and state hypotheses, and to imagine the methods and type of data generated to test the hypotheses.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Forrest Bowlick

TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
18696

Integ. Learning Center S131

fbowlick@umass.edu
15091,20170,23453
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL
0.00

F 9:05AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
18693

Morrill III Room 212

15118,20163,23455
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM
0.00

F 1:25PM 4:25PM

UMass Amherst
18695

Morrill III Room 212

15119
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

99LL
0.00

TH 2:30PM 5:30PM

UMass Amherst
18760

Morrill III Room 212

15116
The goals of this course are to teach you basic GIS concepts such as spatial data sources and structures, projections and coordinate systems, geospatial analysis, cartographic modeling, and the integration of remote sensing and GIS. By the end of the course, students will be proficient in ESRI ArcGIS software.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

John Stranlund

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
20302

Integ. Learning Center S331

stranlund@resecon.umass.edu
Economic analysis of natural resource use and conservation. Includes analyses of the use of fuel, forest, marine and biodiversity resources. Focuses on evaluating natural resource use in terms of efficiency and sustainability, and designing regulations for correcting inefficient and unsustainable resource markets. (Gen.Ed. SB)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

A smiling man with short hair, blue collared shirt, and blue jacket.

Ray Rennard

Director of Academic Programs
Man with red shirt

Andy Danylchuk

Program Director
A smiling woman with shoulder-length brown hair, dark sweater, and a multicolor scarf.

Cindy Bright

Program Coordinator