Dance

Five College Dance comprises the dance departments of our member campuses, with each offering its own distinctive program while collaborating as a uniquely rich inter-campus consortium with abundant possibilities for dance students.

Established in 1978, Five College Dance (FCD) is a creative and intellectual collaboration organized between the dance departments and programs at Amherst, Hampshire, Smith, Mount Holyoke Colleges and University of Massachusetts Amherst. We are a community of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars and artists. We create and amplify access to rich, varied artistic and academic opportunities in dance.

On This Page

Mission:

Five College Dance advances embodied practice as a critical mode of inquiry, expression, and civic engagement across cultural and historical contexts. We cultivate new generations of artists, scholars, and practitioners to shape the field of dance and dance studies.

What We Do:

Our member dance departments and programs collaborate by: Coordinating a shared undergraduate dance curriculum, with diversely trained faculty and varied course offerings in dance technique, performance, composition and theory Producing at least one major repertory project most years, open to all five college students Providing performance opportunities on each campus for all five college students Opening the great majority of campuses’ events, workshops, professionalization opportunities, masterclasses, residencies, symposia, and field trips to all five college students

Professor talking to Dancers

Dancers at Hampshire College developing a performance with Hampshire professor Deborah Goffe. Photo by Ben Barnhart. 

Dancers performing

Five College Dance Provides

  • Production management and technical supervision for all FCD concerts, events and auditions, as well as for any FCD contributions to the annual American College Dance Association conference.
  • Annual production workshop for students producing their own shows, plus additional production-related learning opportunities
  • Annual lecture by a major scholar and/or artist in the field
  • Annual concert with a faculty- and guest-choreographed work submitted from each school, featuring students from all campuses
  • Annual newsletter, with news from the departments, FCD, and alumni
  • Masterclasses from professional dance artists on the UMass Fine Arts Center’s season
  • Centralized communication hub (social media, listserv, website) to share with students and faculty dance-related events, professional opportunities, news, and programs from the campuses, FCD, the local community, and beyond
  • Coordination and facilitation of musician accompanists for most campuses’ technique classes
  • Photographing and archiving professional photos of FCD performances and events
  • Collaborations with non-dance departments/units and external arts organizations
  • Support for the work of individual departments, students, and faculty that will benefit the whole consortium

Annual Newsletter 2020-2021

Keep up with the work of Five College Dance students, faculty members, and alumni in this epublication of our annual newsletter.

Courses

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Technique

01
2.00

The Department

TTH 04:30 PM-05:50 PM

Amherst College
THDA-117H-01-2122S
tdepartment@amherst.edu

This is an intermediate-level course in contemporary dance technique with a primary focus on movement practice. Using the studio as a laboratory, we will embody increasingly complex and dynamic movement that investigates clarity, freedom, adaptability, and artistry and challenges stamina. Additionally, contemporary dance’s roots and influences will be acknowledged and applied through movement exploration. These include the borrowing and fusing of movement vocabularies from jazz, modern, hip hop and improvisational dance forms like Contact Improvisation. Occasional writing assignments will allow us to reflect on our movement histories and articulate personal progress within the course. This course meets twice a week. Pre-requisite: two or more college-level courses in dance techniques, or equivalent experience. Because the study of dance technique requires ongoing practice, this course may be repeated for credit.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Visiting Instructor Konner. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Ashton Lites

MW 04:00 PM-05:20 PM

Amherst College
THDA-122H-01-2122S
alites@amherst.edu

This course is designed to focus on the movement aspect of hip hop culture. Dance in the tradition of B-Boys and B-girls while learning a wide variety of hip hop movement. From the old school "bronx" style to commercial hip hop, learn a wide range of hip-hop vocabulary in a course emphasizing group choreography, floor work, and partner work. No previous dance experience is necessary. Class will incorporate funk, street, b-boy/b-girl, and house elements to stretch and tone the body. Class will include across the floor and center combinations which will ask the dancers to find their relationship to musicality, athleticism, dynamics, and articulation of the body.

Fall semester and spring semesters. Lecturer Lites. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Ashton Lites

MW 05:30 PM-07:00 PM

Amherst College
THDA-123H-01-2122S
alites@amherst.edu

This intermediate course is designed to focus on the movement aspect of hip hop culture. Dance in the tradition of B-Boys and B-girls while learning a wide variety of hip hop movement. From the old school "bronx" style to commercial hip hop, learn a wide range of hip-hop vocabulary in a course emphasizing group choreography, floor work, and partner work. Class will incorporate funk, street, b-boy/b-girl, and house elements to stretch and tone the body. Class will include across the floor and center combinations which will ask the dancers to find their relationship to musicality, athleticism, dynamics, and articulation of the body.

Spring semester. Lecturer Lites. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Jenna M. Riegel

MW 04:00 PM-05:20 PM

Amherst College
THDA-216H-01-2122S
jriegel@amherst.edu

In this course, we will engage in a collaborative, creative process to generate an original choreographic work. We will utilize both embodied and traditional scholarly research to inform and support the emergence of our collective creation and locate our work within a broader historical and cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to increase their expressive range, technical skills, and versatility as performers while also deepening their understanding of shared artistic processes. The course experience will culminate in a presentation of our work either in concert or in digital form at the end of the semester.

Limited to 18 students. Auditions will be conducted during the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Riegel.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1

10:30AM-11:50AM M;10:30AM-11:50AM W

Hampshire College
334611

Music and Dance Building MAIN;Music and Dance Building MAIN

Modern-Contemporary Dance Technique II is an advanced-beginning level class, which will deepen the foundational experience with modern and contemporary dance techniques. The studio will be our laboratory as we explore a wide range of modern dance concepts with a focus on sensation, initiation, expansive use of space, efficiency, safety, connectivity, and embodiment of phrase work. Along the way, we will also bring attention to alignment, spatial clarity, use of breath, increasing range of motion, and the development of strength and stamina as ways to nurture sustainable and deeply engaged dance practice. Keywords: dance, theatre, movement, contemporary, modern
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Instructor To Be Announced

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117168

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex ST3

An introduction to the basic principles of dance movement: body alignment, coordination, strength and flexibility, basic forms of locomotion. No previous dance experience required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Rose Flachs

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116442

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex ST3

rflachs@mtholyoke.edu
A continuation of the knowledge gained in Ballet I. The course will emphasize maintaining correct body placement, coordination of the arms and head while using the whole body for dance. Curriculum covered will include the small and big classical poses and an increase in the allegro portion of the class.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Barbie Diewald

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116444

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex STTH

bdiewald@mtholyoke.edu
This course is a continued practice of modern dance. Physically, the emphasis is on aligned, articulate and efficient dancing through modern dance technique and principles. Students will build capacity for physical endurance and active presence as well as a deepening awareness of the body's potential. Course work will include improvisation, moving into and out of the floor, shifting the centers of gravity, and finding agility and clarity in movement and thought.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Instructor To Be Announced,Charles Flachs

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
117169

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex STTH

cflachs@mtholyoke.edu
In studying dance at the advanced level, students are expected to define their own priorities, thresholds, and modes of working. This course is an opportunity for students to physically engage with dance forms rooted in modern dance and improvisational forms of the mid-twentieth century and the twenty-first century. Daily creative and physical practice and building a resilient and collective dance culture are the foundations of this course. Meeting times will be dedicated to codified modern forms, improvisational practice, and discussion. Advanced placement or instructor permission is required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Rose Flachs

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116446

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex ST3

rflachs@mtholyoke.edu
Course is for advanced dancers and will stress complex classical ballet technique combinations, concentrating on turns at the barre, turns in the big poses in the centre, and batterie in the allegro. Artistry, presentation, and musicality of dance will be incorporated, with the grande allegro serving as the focus of the class. The last half hour will be devoted to advanced pointe technique.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Christina Isabel Martin

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
DAN-114-01-202203

Crew House

cimartin@smith.edu
For students who have taken Beginning Contemporary Dance or the equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Erin Elise Kouwe

M W 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
DAN-120-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

ekouwe@smith.edu

01
2.00

Breton Sarah Tyner-Bryan

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
DAN-121-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

For students who have taken Beginning Ballet or the equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Alexander William Davis,Sarah Shostak Konner

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
DAN-133-01-202203

Crew House

skonner@smith.edu
This course serves as an accessible dance course for all students interested in dance, regardless of ability and dance experience. Throughout the semester, students are introduced to a variety of dance forms and approaches (contemporary dance, salsa, jazz/funk, improvisation). The course promotes the development of dancing skills, aesthetic appreciation, community connection and cultural literacy. In these studio classes, students learn dance techniques while cultivating physical competencies, artistic creativity and bodily expressivity as a part of a community experience. Assignments, class discussions and movement material are designed to foster critical analysis of contemporary issues related to the interaction of dance and society.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Michelle Renee Erard,Yinka Esi Graves

M W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
DAN-142fl-01-202203

Berenson Leeds Studio

merard@smith.edu,ygraves@smith.edu
This course is a comprehensive introduction to flamenco, a product of Spain's blended Andalusian culture. Principles of flamenco musicality and structure are combined with the foundations of flamenco dance technique. Students will study colocación (placement), estilización (stylization), posturas (postures), brazeo (armwork), floreo (handwork), vueltas (turns), taconeo (footwork), compás (phrasing), palmas (rhythmic clapping), jaleo (words of encouragement), and letras (verses). These skills will be applied to choreographic studies and improvisation in a juerga (social) setting. Throughout the semester, students will use their knowledge to build a patada (a short dance) in one of two styles - bulerías or tangos. Sturdy, heeled shoes are required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Tara Murphy

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
DAN-142wa-01-202203

Berenson Studio

tmurphy@smith.edu
This course introduces West African dance, music and song as a traditional mode of expression in various West African countries. It emphasizes appreciation and respect for African culture and its profound influence on American culture and art.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Christina Isabel Martin

M W F 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

Smith College
DAN-202-01-202203

Crew House

cimartin@smith.edu
This course provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between strength, flexibility, and mobility of the body. Through experiential methods students learn how the connective tissues of the body function as an interconnected web which facilitates movement, alignment, coordination, and proprioception. We develop an individualized practice throughout the semester drawing from various movement systems and dance training methods. We examine the relationship between strength, flexibility, and agility as applied to dancing. This course supports students training in dance and other movement forms. Students learn anatomical connections within the musculo-skeletal system and apply them to movement practice. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Miguel Alejandro Castillo Le Maitre

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
DAN-212-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

mcastillolemaitre@smith.edu
THE 212-01, DAN 212-01
Offered as THE 212 and DAN 212. Students immerse in the process of collective creation towards performance. With emphasis on ensemble work and understanding the body as the locus of communication. Students study dance theater companies including Frantic Assembly, DV8, Complicité, Double Edge Theatre, Pina Bausch, and Agile Rascal Bicycle Touring Theatre with the aim of creating a process that is unique to the group and to the political and social reality of the present moment. Students engage with text as an embodied practice. Actors, dancers, directors, improvisers, poets, visual artists, writers, and designers are all welcomed and essential. Previous experience in artistic collaborations is preferable. Enrollment limited to 15. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Rodger Fleming Blum

M W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
DAN-223-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

rblum@smith.edu
Prerequisite: previous dance experience.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Laura Rice Osterhaus Rosenstone

M W 10:50 AM - 12:15 PM

Smith College
DAN-230-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

lrosenstone@smith.edu
Intermediate level dance course, offering experience of the style and culture around the fusion dance form of Jazz Funk. Jazz Funk draws from dance lineages including Jazz and Modern dance, Hip Hop, House, and social dances developed in the clubs and on the streets. Focus is on musicality, rhythm, improvisation, and exchange. Students learn about the Black artists who birthed and developed this form and investigate their individual relationships to the presented ideas and practices. Class contains warm ups, movement vocabulary, phrase work, and performance. Designed for students with some dance experience, but not necessary to have Jazz Funk experience. Enrollment limited to 25. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Tara Murphy

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:15 PM

Smith College
DAN-242-01-202203
tmurphy@smith.edu
This studio course offers intermediate level technique training in any of the dance forms from Africa and the African Diaspora. The physical study of the form is contextualized socially, culturally and historically, favoring an interdisciplinary perspective. Through the course, students approach the study of dance as a catalyst for cultural empowerment and social change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Djeffrey Jean philippe

M W 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Smith College
DAN-246-01-202203

Berenson Studio

djeanphilippe@smith.edu
Journey through time and experience in your own body the evolution of hip hop from its social dance roots to the contemporary phenomenon of commercial choreography that hip hop has become. Using film and text in addition to studio work, this class creates a framework from which to understand and participate in the global culture of hip hop dance.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Angie Hauser

TU TH 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
DAN-317-01-202203

Crew House

ahauser@smith.edu
By audition/permission only. Prerequisite: DAN 216.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Rodger Fleming Blum

TU TH 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Smith College
DAN-325-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

rblum@smith.edu
By audition/permission only.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Molly Christie

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
28032

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

mchristie@dance.umass.edu
Modern Dance technique after the Humphrey/Limon style. Floor work, center and locomotor exercises geared to enhance the student's strength, coordination, balance, flexibility, spatial awareness, rhythmic understanding and dynamics of movement. Attention is given to isolated movements and full combinations across the floor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Thomas Vacanti

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
28007

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

tvacanti@dance.umass.edu
A continuation of DANCE 120. Also taught at Mount Holyoke and Smith.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Lauren Cox

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
28062

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

lecox@umass.edu
This course is designed to be simultaneously technical, philosophical, and socio-cultural. It is intended to cultivate a practice of mining an available body within the landscape of Jazz dance technique and researching the possibilities of self-transformation through shifts in perception of dance. Through both directed improvisational and structured exercises, students will learn to tune their mind/body by deepening texture, tone, availability, dynamic intent, rhythmic complexity, musicality, emotional/theatrical capacity, isolation, technical versatility, nuance, expansive physicality and performance quality.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
36953

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

01
2.00

Molly Lynch

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
28027

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

mflynch@umass.edu
Building on Modern II, this class is geared towards refining a dancer's kinesthetic awareness and to enhance the student's strength, coordination, balance, flexibility, spatial awareness, rhythmic understanding and dynamics of movement. Attention is given to isolated movements and full combinations across the floor or in center.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Thomas Vacanti

M W F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
28009

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

tvacanti@dance.umass.edu
In this course, we will engage in the studio practice of intermediate ballet technique. Grounded in anatomically sound alignment, the class borrows from a number of styles in order to explore various technical challenges. It is designed for dancers of all movement forms who have developed their ballet practice to an intermediate level. Through our practice we will increase the strength, flexibility and range of each student's ballet dancing. We will focus on musicality, phrasing, gesture, focus and other details of the form, and we will develop the individual aesthetic and creative expression of each dancer. We will cultivate the joy of dancing with our whole selves and in community, and we will experience ways the form of ballet is related to other forms of dance with which we are engaged.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Lauren Cox

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
36936

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

lecox@umass.edu
A continuation of DANCE 232. Also taught at Mount Holyoke and Smith.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Thomas Vacanti

M W F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
36937

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

tvacanti@dance.umass.edu
A continuation of DANCE 324. Taught on two campuses each semester. Location rotates among Mount Holyoke, Smith, and the University. Placement in the course is by Five College audition.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: History, Criticism, Aesthetics, & Research

01
4.00

Jude Sandy

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
THDA-224-01-2122S
jsandy@amherst.edu
THDA-224-01, BLST-124-01, ENGL-379-01

(Offered as THDA 224, BLST 124, and ENGL 379) What is the “African” in “African-American?” From the point of view of U.S. American theater, what is the relationship between African-American theatrical practices and those of a global African diaspora? Grounded in Paul Gilroy’s and other theorists’ positing of “The Black Atlantic,” this course will examine how notions of shared and distinct cultural heritages collide and co-mingle across the theatrical performance worlds of African and other African-descendant peoples. Our point of reference will be canonical and contemporary plays and dance-theater works by African-American artists like Adrienne Kennedy, August Wilson, Katherine Dunham, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, Ronald K. Brown, Marcus Gardley, Jackie Sibblies-Drury, Danai Gurira, and others. We will examine how the conflicts, solidarities and assertions of identity and heritage in these artists’ works relate to that of such African-continental, -Caribbean, -European and trans-national figures as Pearl Primus, Wole Soyinka, Germaine Acogny, Ama Ata Aidoo, Femi Osofisan, Derek Walcott, Aimé Césaire, Trevor Rhone, Natasha Gordon and others. This comparative study will be situated against the seminal backdrop of diaspora cultures of ceremonial performance practices still evident throughout the Black world. 

Visiting Assistant Professor Jude Sandy. Spring semester. 2021-2022.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jenna M. Riegel, Ana Candida Carneiro

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
THDA-245-01-2122S
jriegel@amherst.edu acarneiro@amherst.edu

How do artists invent, reinvent, reinforce, or challenge racial identities through performance? Can race and racism be thought of as performance? What can citizen-performers do to construct a broader and more equitable social narrative? In this course, we will explore key concepts in performance and race studies, and consider them alongside intersecting identities, such as gender, sexuality, class, and disability. We will examine the work of modern and contemporary theater and dance artists of color, such as Suzan-Lori Parks, Larissa Fasthorse, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Bill T. Jones, Eiko & Koma, Ananya Chatterjea, Miguel Gutierrez, and Ni’ja Whitson, through a lens of racially-defined aesthetics. We will also inquire into the ethics of art-making processes by encountering a variety of perspectives and practices shared by guest artists. In addition to reading, writing and discussion, this course will include creative practices to support the embodied understanding of course concepts. 

Spring Semester. Professors Carneiro and Riegel.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

1
4.00

Lailye Weidman

10:30AM-11:50AM TU;10:30AM-11:50AM TH

Hampshire College
334567

;

lmwHA@hampshire.edu
Athletes taking a knee, bodies marching in the street, dance movements that go viral. How can Dance Studies help us see and understand the urgency of [social] movement in our current moment? At the same time, how does dance challenge normative conceptualizations of history and politics? Exploring dance and embodied politics of the 20th and 21st century through the lens of Dance Studies, this course works from the perspective of "Critical Moves" proposed by late dance theorist Randy Martin: "Critical moves. Steps we must take. Movement that informs critical consciousness." The interrelationship between theory and practice will be emphasized through reading, writing, movement exercises, and creative workshops. Students will regularly read, write, and move; view and discuss performances; pursue a final research project through embodied, visual, and text-based methods; and work on a collective performance intervention that will take place on campus during the semester. No dance experience necessary, just open curiosity. Keywords: dance, performance, politics, activism, body
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jamila Jackson

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
117117

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex STTH

jujackson@mtholyoke.edu
This course will be a contemporary exploration of the physical, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of the African-rooted community dance circle. Through technical, literary, and media-based explorations, students will examine the circle as a culture of healing and transformation that sustains people of African heritage across geographic spaces spanning both oceans and time. By investigating dance improvisation as a practice of deep listening and as a method of negotiating with precarity and the unknown, we will conduct in-depth research on the potentials of the circle as a place of embodiment, resource, and belonging that can be participated in by people across all cultures, races, and backgrounds.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lester Tomé

M W 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
DAN-171-01-202203

Theatre 207A

ltome@smith.edu
DAN 171 excavates the artistic, social, and cultural trends that have driven the histories of ballet, jazz dance, modern dance, and postmodern dance throughout the 20th &21st centuries. The course looks critically at artists such as Isadora Duncan, Rudolf Laban, George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Katherine Dunham, Alvin Ailey, Anna Halprin, Pina Bausch, and Bill T. Jones. Through readings, discussions, dance viewings, movement activities, and sessions in the Museum of Art, Josten Library, and Sophia Smith Collection, students examine how notions of race, nationality, gender, sexuality, and political ideology inform dance. Students conduct historical research on a topic of their choice. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lester Tomé

M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
DAN-377sa-01-202203

Theatre 207A

ltome@smith.edu
This course is an in-depth exploration of salsa from theoretical and practical perspectives. Dance lessons familiarize the students with beginner to intermediate level salsa steps, targeting skills in bodily coordination, musicality, expressivity and improvisation, as well as in memorization of choreography and communication between partners. The learning of the dance is framed within and analysis of literature on salsa cutting across dance history, anthropology, musicology and cultural studies. Readings, documentaries, class discussions and research assignments situate salsa as an expression of Latino and Latin American cultures, but also as a global product through which dancers and musicians from Cuba to Japan perform notions of gender, ethnicity and nationality. No previous dance experience required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Molly Christie

M W 10:10AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
28051

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

mchristie@dance.umass.edu
Not available at this time
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Repertory

01
2.00

Jenna M. Riegel

MW 05:30 PM-07:00 PM

Amherst College
THDA-218H-01-2122S
jriegel@amherst.edu

In this course, we will engage in a collaborative, creative process to generate an original choreographic work. We will utilize both embodied and traditional scholarly research to inform and support the emergence of our collective creation and locate our work within a broader historical and cultural context. Students will have the opportunity to increase their expressive range, technical skills, and versatility as performers while also deepening their understanding of shared artistic processes. The course experience will culminate in a presentation of our work either in concert or in digital form at the end of the semester.

Limited to 18 students. Auditions will be conducted during the first class meeting. Spring semester. Professor Riegel.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Composition, Choreography, & Creative Process

01
4.00

Wendy Woodson

MW 01:30 PM-03:30 PM

Amherst College
THDA-111-01-2122S
wwoodson@amherst.edu

An introduction to movement as a language and to dance and performance composition. Students will explore and expand their individual movement vocabularies by working improvisationally with weight, posture, gesture, patterns, rhythm, space, and relationship of body parts. We will ask what these vocabularies might communicate about emotion, thought, physical structures, cultural/social traditions, and aesthetic preferences. In addition, we will use observations of movement in our everyday situations and environments, as well as from staged and filmed events, as inspiration for individual and group compositions. Selected readings and viewing of video and films will be included to give students a broad overview of dance and movement practices and tools with which to observe and analyze movement.  

Attention will be drawn to issues of race, class, gender and culture in looking at diverse languages of movement. In addition to two two-hour class meetings per week, students participate in the equivalent of a two-hour per week laboratory experience coordinated with the department’s production season.

Limited to 20 students. Six seats reserved for first-year students. Spring semester. Professor Woodson.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jude Sandy

TTH 01:30 PM-03:30 PM

Amherst College
THDA-233-01-2122S
jsandy@amherst.edu

How do actors offer vigorous contributions towards ensemble storytelling, while refining their own interpretive capacities? How do we shape and deploy the full energy and specificity of our individual, relational, and collective performance possibilities? How do we work together in manipulating myriad dynamics to hold and shape space, direct focus, orchestrate sound and rhythm, build and release tension, all towards distinctive group playmaking? This intermediate studio course builds on foundations of THDA 113: Action and Character as it continues to hone skills in voice, textual interpretation and embodiment of character towards more fully realized creative partnerships. A progression of study employs elements of Linklater Voice Training, Alexander Technique, Viewpoints, theater games and other practices to deepen each actor’s connective capabilities, while introducing approaches for collaboration towards more deeply shared interpretations of ensemble scene-work. Students will be guided through frameworks for experimenting, crafting, and directing themselves and their peers through increasingly challenging performance propositions, while taking on heightened texts and embodying epic theatrical roles that demand individual and collective commitment, facility, dynamism, and power.

Limited to 14 students. Spring semester. Visiting Assistant Professor Jude Sandy. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ana Candida Carneiro

MW 12:00 PM-01:20 PM

Amherst College
THDA-272-01-2122S
acarneiro@amherst.edu
THDA-272-01, ENGL-323-01

(Offered as THDA 272 and ENGL 323) This course is an exploration of writing for performance using interdisciplinary and experimental approaches. By exposing students to contemporary manifestations of performance across cultures – including those by Rodrigo Garcia, Rimini Protokoll, Romeo Castelluci, Robert Lepage, Carolina Vivas, and Gebing Tian – this course will lead to a new understanding of the art and practice of writing for the theater. In dialogue with other artforms such as literature, music, dance, and cinema, as well as performance theory, we will creatively explore dynamics involving words, bodies, spaces, objects, and media. Through imagining, devising, writing, and performing exercises, participants will develop their own original pieces that will be showcased as works-in-progress at the end of the semester. 

Limited to 18 students. Spring Semester. Visiting Artist Carneiro.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Wendy Woodson

F 12:00 PM-03:00 PM

Amherst College
THDA-355-01-2122S
wwoodson@amherst.edu
THDA-355-01

In this studio course, we will explore different skills and approaches towards creating solo performance. We will examine examples of historical and contemporary solo performances in theater, dance, video, music, radio plays, street, stand up and in political/social arenas to inform and ask what makes these effective (or not). We will use what we learn from these examples to inspire our own solo material. We will also develop additional techniques (through improvisational trial and error) that enliven and engage our different voices, stories, imaginations and emotions. An emphasis will be placed on exploring and crafting dynamic relationships within and between different media and modes of expression in order to create confident and compelling solo presentations for live and virtual arenas. We will consider the solo as both a personal vehicle of expression and as a means of giving voice to experiences of others. In the process of making compositional choices, we will consider the personal and social implications of these choices. The semester will culminate in public performances of final solos.

Requisite: Previous experience in performance and/or video--whether in the arts or public presentations in other disciplines/contexts. Open to juniors and seniors. Admission with consent of the instructor. Limited to 10 students. Spring semester. Professor Woodson.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

1
4.00

Lailye Weidman

01:00PM-02:20PM M;01:00PM-02:20PM W

Hampshire College
334561

Music and Dance Building SMALL;Music and Dance Building SMALL

lmwHA@hampshire.edu
This course invites students to dive into choreographic thinking, movement generation, experimentation, and dance-making research. Together we will define and expand choreographic possibilities through weekly dance-making assignments-both solo and collaborative. Students will produce choreographic studies that address specific concepts, lenses, and methods for crafting dance. Specifically, we will explore dance as a poetic medium-using movement as an entry into dwelling with rhythm, phrasing, mood, and tone. We will reflect together on one another's work, looking to provide generative, generous, and insightfully critical feedback. Final projects will evolve over the latter portion of the semester and be performed in an informal showing. Other requirements include viewing live performances at the Five Colleges and in the community, viewing dance on video, and engaging with readings, discussions, and reflective writing assignments. No previous experience in dance is required. Concurrent study of dance technique is encouraged. Keywords: dance, choreography, performance, poetry, theatre
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rose Flachs,Charles Flachs

TH 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116445

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex ST3

rflachs@mtholyoke.educflachs@mtholyoke.edu
Intermediate Composition is structured as a workshop for you to explore and expand your own artistic vision. It will increase your understanding of inspiration and intention as they relate to choreography as well as encourage active consideration of choreographic possibilities for space, time, performer/audience interaction, energetic qualities, use of text, music, and physical and environmental intelligences.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Chris Aiken

TU TH 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
DAN-151-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

caiken@smith.edu
Introductory study of dance composition, including movement research, spatial design, rhythmic phrasing, musical forms, and performance.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Angie Hauser,Chris Aiken

M W 1:10 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
DAN-339-01-202203

Crew House

ahauser@smith.edu,caiken@smith.edu
This course offers an opportunity to explore how place and landscape offer inspiration and opportunities for dance, performance and embodied experience. Place can include natural landscapes, buildings, parks, pathways, stairways, living rooms, and the place of our bodies. The goal of this course is to create bridges between the ecological and the poetic realms of human experience. Students will explore how creativity is being in relationship to things, beings, environments, and the historical and cultural contexts. This course includes a series of public performances and is open to students interested in engaging in creative collaborative process. Enrollment limited to 18. (E)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
28026

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

Dancers will create many short studies based on elements of dance composition, space, time, energy. Exploring the use of imagery, props and various forms of music as source material, they will create solos and small group studies. A background in dance improvisation is highly recommended.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Dance Education/Community

01
3.00

Molly Christie

TU TH 8:30AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
37763

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

mchristie@dance.umass.edu

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Anatomy & Dance Science

01
4.00

Barbie Diewald,Marta Sabariego

T 01:30PM-04:20PM;T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
117127

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex STTH;Kendall Hall/Sports Complex 130

bdiewald@mtholyoke.edumsabarie@mtholyoke.edu
117126,117127
This course will provide a research site to investigate the functions of the hippocampal brain region to then embody that learning through choreographic structures. In particular, students will use dance expression to aid the understanding of complex neuroscience topics, and apply neuroscience knowledge to deepen creative expression. "Mobilizing the hippocampus" will help to bridge a gap between science and art, serving as a tool to stimulate a heightened understanding of both disciplines.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Cecilia Fontanesi

W 4:00PM 6:00PM

UMass Amherst
28063

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 11

cfontanesi@umass.edu
An introduction to kinesiology with specific applications to dance. We will attend to fundamental principles of human anatomy, biomechanics, motor development, and motor learning. We will establish a working lexicon for articulating musculoskeletal structures involved in simple action sequences. We will define motor learning theories and discuss motor development trajectories, along with illustrations of their dance-specific applications from the scientific literature. Labs will focus on acquiring skill in administering motor development assessments and functional tests. This course establishes the theoretical and practical groundwork required for further study of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular systems and tests, particularly in the context of dance training and performance evaluation (see: Scientific Foundations of Dance II). (Gen. Ed. BS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LL

M 4:00PM 5:00PM

UMass Amherst
28064

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

An introduction to kinesiology with specific applications to dance. We will attend to fundamental principles of human anatomy, biomechanics, motor development, and motor learning. We will establish a working lexicon for articulating musculoskeletal structures involved in simple action sequences. We will define motor learning theories and discuss motor development trajectories, along with illustrations of their dance-specific applications from the scientific literature. Labs will focus on acquiring skill in administering motor development assessments and functional tests. This course establishes the theoretical and practical groundwork required for further study of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular systems and tests, particularly in the context of dance training and performance evaluation (see: Scientific Foundations of Dance II). (Gen. Ed. BS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01LM

M 5:30PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
28065

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

An introduction to kinesiology with specific applications to dance. We will attend to fundamental principles of human anatomy, biomechanics, motor development, and motor learning. We will establish a working lexicon for articulating musculoskeletal structures involved in simple action sequences. We will define motor learning theories and discuss motor development trajectories, along with illustrations of their dance-specific applications from the scientific literature. Labs will focus on acquiring skill in administering motor development assessments and functional tests. This course establishes the theoretical and practical groundwork required for further study of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular systems and tests, particularly in the context of dance training and performance evaluation (see: Scientific Foundations of Dance II). (Gen. Ed. BS)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Movement & Rhythmic Analysis

01
3.00

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
28049

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

An overview of rhythm, harmony, and various musical styles as they relate to teaching dance, choreographing, and performing. Students will learn to read rhythmic notation, study and play a variety of percussion instruments, and engage in movement, vocal, and percussion improvisation. Some degree of previous dance training or experience is suggested as this course is geared towards but not limited to dance majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Design & Production

01
4.00

Kathy C. Couch

TTH 01:30 PM-03:30 PM

Amherst College
THDA-112-01-2122S
kcouch@amherst.edu

An introduction to methods of visual research and visual creativity for textual, narrative, and performance interpretation. The course is conducted in a format combining discussions, creative play, student presentations, and collaborative critique. Class discussions and readings include the theoretical basis of a range of historical theatrical conventions, from Aristotle through Robert Wilson. Class exercises in perception and analysis build skills culminating in the realization of three-dimensional and story-boarding projects. In addition to two two-hour class meetings per week, students participate in the equivalent of a two-hour per week laboratory experience coordinated with the department’s production season.

Limited to 12 students per section. Spring semester. Resident Lighting Designer Couch. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Alexander William Davis

Smith College
DAN-200-01-202203
A laboratory course based on the preparation and performance of department productions. Students may elect to fulfill course requirements from a wide array of production related responsibilities, including stage crew. It may not be used for performance or choreography. May be taken four times for credit, with a maximum of two credits per semester.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
1.00

Alexander William Davis

Smith College
DAN-201-01-202203
A laboratory course based on the preparation and performance of department productions. Students may elect to fulfill course requirements from a wide array of production related responsibilities, including stage crew. It may not be used for performance or choreography. May be taken four times for credit, with maximum of two credits per semester. Can be taken with DAN 200.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Seminar Courses & Related Topics

01
2.00

Barbie Diewald

M 04:00PM-06:00PM;M 04:00PM-06:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116447

Kendall Hall/Sports Complex STTH;Kendall Hall/Sports Complex 130

bdiewald@mtholyoke.edu
Each dance major will be expected to be involved in a senior project during their final year of study. One should sign up for Dance 390, Senior Seminar for both fall and spring semesters. Senior projects can vary, from choreographic or performance work to research topics.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Angie Hauser

M 2:45 PM - 5:15 PM

Smith College
DAN-399-01-202203

Scott Dance Studio

ahauser@smith.edu
Senior seminar is a capstone course that integrates dance studies through an individual research or creative project and to articulate critical analysis and feedback for peers. Required for senior dance majors and open by permission to other seniors with a serious interest in dance. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Molly Lynch

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
28040

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. Gym

mflynch@umass.edu
Through meetings weekly with various professors and professionals in the field, each student will be guided in drawing from their studies in various fields at the university. Emphasis is in integrating the student?s body of knowledge with their experience and community in the five college dance department. Workshops and presentations in lighting, staging, videotaping, creativity, collaboration, and production to help each student prepare the most exciting work possible for the concert stage. Each week students will have a seminar in a different area affecting choreography and choreographic choices, with reading, writing, and journaling assignments, that will help students reflect on their own artistic process, and discover the many resources on and off-campus. Students will use knowledge from previous courses taken across campus, from music and art classes, to writing, science, and analytical reasoning courses. Oral communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and interdisciplinary perspective-taking at a more advanced level will be part of the weekly workshops. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Dance and BFA-Dance majors.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Lauren Cox

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
28074

Totman Phys. Ed. Bldg. rm 204

lecox@umass.edu
This course is designed to address the critical issues students face in their transition into the professional world. The underlying vehicle of the course consists of small group projects as well as individual case studies. The course culminates with each student compiling a personalized file of essential resources, ideas, trends, strategies and people unique to their dance career aspirations. This "map" will empower students as they navigate their journey from campus to the real world.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Cecilia Fontanesi

M 4:00PM 6:45PM

UMass Amherst
28036

Arnold Room 104

cfontanesi@umass.edu
Course requires that individual BA and BFA candidates create an 8-12 minutes of original work, bringing it through all stages of production to concert performance. Students will take on all aspects of being creative director of their senior project; including auditions, casting, rehearsal schedule and overall creative process. In addition, students will be required to keep a written journal and also submit an in depth creative process research paper.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Spring 2022 Dance Courses: Graduate Courses

01
3.00

Jake Meginsky

F 9:25 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
DAN-500ms-01-202203

Crew House

jmeginsky@smith.edu

01
3.00

Rodger Fleming Blum

TU TH 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
DAN-500vc-01-202203

Hillyer 320

rblum@smith.edu

01
2.00

Chris Aiken

Smith College
DAN-505-01-202203
caiken@smith.edu
First-year MFA students enroll in this course to fulfill the graduate performance requirement. Enrollment in DAN 505 takes place in the same semester as the performance. The requirement is met by participating in the choreography of a Five College Dance Department faculty member (including guest artists) or an MFA thesis. Students must attend the respective auditions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
2.00

Chris Aiken

Smith College
DAN-507-01-202203
caiken@smith.edu
First-year MFA students enroll in this course to fulfill the graduate dance production requirement (usually stage managing a dance concert). Enrollment in DAN 507 takes place in the semester when the student completes the dance production assignment, as scheduled by the faculty.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Contact Us

A smiling woman in front of a brick wall with shoulder-length brown hair and a cream-colored sweater.

Dr. Alexandra Ripp

Director of Five College Dance

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