Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

The Five College Certificate in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies enhances rather than replaces the more traditional major, minor or certificate available at the individual schools and can complement the student's major field of study.

Under the guidance of an appointed faculty adviser for the program at each campus, students design a sequential, coordinated and comprehensive course of study drawing on the faculty specialists and course offerings at the five campuses. The program is overseen by the Five College Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies Council, whose members include faculty representatives from each campus.

Any degree-seeking student is eligible to earn the certificate. Interested students must consult initially with an advisor for the program at their own home campus, to confirm their eligibility and plan out an appropriate course of study. The home-campus advisor for the program also determines whether a student has met the requirements, and recommends the award of a formal certificate, which is recorded on the student's transcript. Completed applications for the certificate must be signed by the home campus adviser, who will bring the application to the FCLACLS Certificate Program committee.

Faculty

Lloyd Barba*- Latinx and Latin American Studies, Religion
Rhonda Cobham-Sander - Black Studies, English, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Sony Coráñez Bolton - Latinx and Latin American Studies, Spanish
Javier Corrales - Political Science (Chair) and Latinx and Latin American Studies
Solsiree del Moral - Black Studies (Chair), American Studies, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Rick A. Lopez - Latinx and Latin American Studies (Chair), History, Environmental Studies; Dean of New Students
Leah Schmalzbauer - American Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Paul Schroeder Rodríguez - Latinx and Latin American Studies, Spanish, Film and Media Studies

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Roosbelinda Cardenas - Latin American Studies and Anthropology
Margaret Cerullo* - Sociology
Norman Holland - Hispano Literature (Emeritus)
Susana Loza - Critical Race, Gender, and Media Studies
Flavio Risech-Ozeguera - Law (Emeritus)
Monique Roelofs - Philosophy (Emerita)
Wilson Valentín Escobar - Sociology and American Studies

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Justin Crumbaugh - Spanish, Latino/a, Latin American Studies
Lowell Gudmundson - Latin American Studies and History (Emeritus)
Christian Gundermann - Gender Studies
David Hernández - Latino/a Studies
Lynn Morgan - Anthropology (Emeritus)
Dorothy Mosby - Spanish; Interim Dean of Faculty and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Eva Paus - Economics
Adriana Pitetta* - Spanish

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero - Anthropology
Ginetta E.B. Candelario - Sociology, Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Velma Garcia - Government
Maria Estela Harretche - Spanish
Marguerite Itamar Harrison - Spanish and Portuguese
Michelle Joffroy - Spanish
Elizabeth Klarich - Anthropology
Dana Leibsohn - Art, Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Malcolm McNee - Spanish and Portuguese
Javier Puente* - Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Maria Helena Rueda - Spanish
Lester Tomé - Dance

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Sonia Alvarez - Political Science
Luiz Amaral - Spanish and Portuguese Linguistics
Benjamin Bailey - Communication
Whitney Battle-Baptiste - Anthropology
Angelica Bernal - Political Science
James K. Boyce - Economics (Emeritus)
Laura Briggs - Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Mari Castaneda - Communication
Leda Cooks - Communication
N.C. Christopher Couch - Comparative Literature
Emiliana Cruz - Anthropology
Alexandrina Deschamps - Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Carlene Edie - Political Science
Gerald Epstein - Economics
Harley Erdman - Theater
Martin Espada - English
Stephanie Fetta* - Spanish and Portuguese Studies
Martha Fuentes-Bautista - Communication
Patricia Galvis Assmus - Art, Architecture, and Art History (Emerita)
Agustin Lao-Montes - Sociology & Afro-American Studies
Jennifer Lundquist - Sociology
Claudio Moreira - Communication
Michael J. Morgan - Communication (Emeritus)
Leonce Ndikumana - Economics
Jose Ornelas - Spanish and Portuguese Literature (Emeritus)
Daphne Patai - Spanish and Portuguese Literature (Emerita)
J. Mohan Rao - Economics (Emeritus)
Margara Russotto - Latin American Literature and Culture
Felipe Salles - Music and Dance
Heidi Scott - History
Millie Thayer - Sociology
Jacqueline Urla - Anthropology
Laura Valdiviezo - College of Education

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Certificate Requirements

To earn a FCLACLS Certificate, students must complete successfully a minimum of eight one-semester courses selected from five different areas; fulfill a specified language requirement; and achieve at least a grade of “B” in the minimum number of courses taken toward the certificate. Courses may be taken at any of the campuses but must be approved in advance by the student's home-campus advisor for the program. Completed applications for the certificate must be signed by the home campus advisor, who will bring the application to the Five College LACLS Council meeting in April.

Courses

Eight full courses or educational activities (each 3–4 credits or equivalent) must be completed within the following areas:

  1. A broadly based introductory course on the social and political history of Latin America or U.S. Latinos
  2. One course in the social sciences that focuses substantially on Latin America or U.S. Latinos (including courses in anthropology, economics, geography, political science, etc.)
  3. One course in the humanities that focuses substantially on Latin America or U.S. Latinos (including courses in art, art history, dance, folklore, literature, music, philosophy, religion or theater, etc. )
  4. Four other courses that should be more advanced and more specific in focus
  5. One upper-level seminar in Latin America and/or U.S. Latinos
  6. Those students who begin their studies during or after fall 2013 will be required to have, within all of their courses, at least one course in Latino Studies and at least one course in Latin American or Caribbean Studies
  7. At least one course must be taken at one of the institutions in the Five College consortium other than the student's home campus.

Language Requirement

Proficiency through second-year college level in an official (other than English) or indigenous language of Latin America.

Minimum Standard

To receive the certificate, the student must receive a grade of “B” or better in every course that qualifies for the minimum certificate requirement.

Study Abroad

The Council will accept relevant study abroad courses, as long as they are accepted for credit or equivalent by a student’s home institution. If no grade is reported on the transcript, the Council will waive the “B” grade requirement for courses taken abroad.

Courses

Many courses in addition to those listed below may be eligible for fulfilling the requirements of the Five College Latin American, Caribbean & Latino Studies Certificate. Students are encouraged to consult an LACLS Program campus advisor to identify courses that are appropriate for their interests.

Fall 2021 Courses

01
4.00

Solsiree Del Moral, Pawan Dhingra

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
AMST-140-01-2122F

FROS 211

sdelmoral@amherst.edu pdhingra@amherst.edu
AMST-140-01,LLAS-140-01

(Offered as AMST 140 and LJST 140) While discussions of white supremacy are more common now than even a few years ago, the image of the United States as a nation of immigrants remains popular. How can we connect these two notions, that on the one hand the country was founded on and practices a settler colonialism and racial capitalism that privileges whites, with that on the other hand many immigrants of color are working towards their American Dream? Through sociological and historical texts, the course will interrogate what is behind immigration to the United States, including the nation’s imperial and neocolonial interventions abroad that have created the foundation for much displacement. The course also delves into how immigrants navigate racial hierarchies – sometimes successfully and sometimes not – across a variety of spaces, including education, the workplace, cultural discourse, and more. Attention will be given to various groups, including Asian Americans, Latinxs, and others. Students will have research and writing assessments.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Professors del Moral and Dhingra.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Kent Lohse

MW 04:00PM-05:20PM

Amherst College
BLST-268-01-2122F

CHAP 205

klohse@amherst.edu
HIST-268-01,BLST-268-01,LLAS-268-01

01
4.00

Kent Lohse

MW 01:30PM-02:50PM

Amherst College
HIST-264-01-2122F

CHAP 119

klohse@amherst.edu
HIST-264-01,LLAS-264-01

(Offered as HIST 264 [LA/TC/TE/TR/P] and LLAS 264)  Over the course of three centuries, massive migrations from Europe and Africa and the dramatic decline of indigenous populations in South and Central America radically transformed the cultural, political, economic, and material landscape of what we today know as Latin America. This course will investigate the dynamism of Latin American societies beginning in the ancient or pre-conquest period and ending with the collapse of European rule in most Spanish, Portuguese, and French speaking territories in the New World. We will explore this history through the eyes of various historical actors, including politicians, explorers, noble men and women, indigenous intellectuals, and African slaves. In addition to interrogating the myriad of peaceable and creative cross-cultural exchanges and interactions that characterized the relationship between these groups, we will also explore how conflict, exploitation, and natural disaster shaped the Colonial Latin American experience. Through a mixture of lecture, small and large group activities, and analysis of primary and secondary sources we will also consider how historians understand the past as well as the foundational debates which shape our current interpretations of colonial Latin American history. Two class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kent Lohse

MW 04:00PM-05:20PM

Amherst College
HIST-268-01-2122F

CHAP 205

klohse@amherst.edu
HIST-268-01,BLST-268-01,LLAS-268-01

(Offered as HIST 268 [LA/TE/TR/P], BLST 268 [CLA] and LLAS 268) Students will gain in-depth knowledge of the experiences of Africans and their descendants, slave and free, from the time the first captives were brought to Hispaniola in 1503 until the time of abolition in Cuba in 1886 in this course. Regions to be covered include the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America, and the Andean and Southern Cone regions. Topics will include the ways in which specific regions of Western Africa contributed captives to specific regions of Spanish America, the nature of Spanish colonial institutions and their impact on the lives of Africans and their descendants, resistance and rebellion, routes to freedom, and slave and free Black families. This readings-based course features both secondary and primary sources. Select primary documents will acquaint students with the sources historians use to reconstruct these aspects of the histories of largely non-literate African-descended peoples.

Fall semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Solsiree Del Moral, Pawan Dhingra

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
LLAS-140-01-2122F

FROS 211

sdelmoral@amherst.edu pdhingra@amherst.edu
AMST-140-01,LLAS-140-01

(Offered as AMST 140 and LJST 140) While discussions of white supremacy are more common now than even a few years ago, the image of the United States as a nation of immigrants remains popular. How can we connect these two notions, that on the one hand the country was founded on and practices a settler colonialism and racial capitalism that privileges whites, with that on the other hand many immigrants of color are working towards their American Dream? Through sociological and historical texts, the course will interrogate what is behind immigration to the United States, including the nation’s imperial and neocolonial interventions abroad that have created the foundation for much displacement. The course also delves into how immigrants navigate racial hierarchies – sometimes successfully and sometimes not – across a variety of spaces, including education, the workplace, cultural discourse, and more. Attention will be given to various groups, including Asian Americans, Latinxs, and others. Students will have research and writing assessments.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester. Professors del Moral and Dhingra.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Kent Lohse

MW 01:30PM-02:50PM

Amherst College
LLAS-264-01-2122F

CHAP 119

klohse@amherst.edu
HIST-264-01,LLAS-264-01

(Offered as HIST 264 [LA/TC/TE/TR/P] and LLAS 264)  Over the course of three centuries, massive migrations from Europe and Africa and the dramatic decline of indigenous populations in South and Central America radically transformed the cultural, political, economic, and material landscape of what we today know as Latin America. This course will investigate the dynamism of Latin American societies beginning in the ancient or pre-conquest period and ending with the collapse of European rule in most Spanish, Portuguese, and French speaking territories in the New World. We will explore this history through the eyes of various historical actors, including politicians, explorers, noble men and women, indigenous intellectuals, and African slaves. In addition to interrogating the myriad of peaceable and creative cross-cultural exchanges and interactions that characterized the relationship between these groups, we will also explore how conflict, exploitation, and natural disaster shaped the Colonial Latin American experience. Through a mixture of lecture, small and large group activities, and analysis of primary and secondary sources we will also consider how historians understand the past as well as the foundational debates which shape our current interpretations of colonial Latin American history. Two class meetings per week.

Fall semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kent Lohse

MW 04:00PM-05:20PM

Amherst College
LLAS-268-01-2122F

CHAP 205

klohse@amherst.edu
HIST-268-01,BLST-268-01,LLAS-268-01

01
4.00

Fiona Dixon

MW 01:30PM-02:50PM

Amherst College
SPAN-312-01-2122F

WEBS 102

fdixon@amherst.edu

Language is an integral part of identity performance and perception. Paying special attention to the topic of race, this course examines the power of language and language ideologies as exclusionary and inclusionary social tools, permitting or denying group membership. Via the analysis of literary and historical texts, linguistic and anthropological research, and digital media, students learn about the role of language variation in various Hispanic socio-political contexts. Through in-class discussions, small projects, and writing assignments, we contemplate the role of language in amplifying or contesting social inequality among Latinos in the U.S., Blacks and gays in the Caribbean, Latin American migrants in Spain, indigenous communities in México, etc. In doing so, students learn about linguistic variation in Spanish, hone their critical thinking skills, and learn to apply sociolinguistic and anthropological methodology to socio-cultural analysis. As the course is conducted in Spanish, an additional aim of the course is to sharpen second language speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

* No prior knowledge of anthropology or (socio)linguistics is expected.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of instructor. Limited to 18 Students. Fall Semester: Lecturer Dixon.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ilan Stavchansky

TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Amherst College
SPAN-322-01-2122F

BARR 102

istavans@amherst.edu

Taught simultaneously at Amherst and Bowdoin, the course is designed as a cultural history of Hispanic civilization through its dictionaries. What authority do they exert? Who collects them? In what way do dictionaries change? The focus will be on the role words have played in history and their political, social, and commercial value. Starting with lexicons of indigenous, slave, and immigrant languages, students will engage in an in-depth exploration of figures like Antonio de Nebrija, Sebastián de Covarrubias, Andres Bello, and Maria Moliner. There will be a discussion of the asymmetrical relationship between Spain and Latin America and the importance of gender, media, sports, and cuisine. The Tesoro de la Lengua Espanola o Castellana, the Diccionario de Autoridades, the Diccionario de la Lengua Española, the MolinerLarousse, and Clave will all be analyzed. Active research in compiling neologisms and other emerging words will be a feature of the course work. The endeavor will culminate in the publication of a scholarly book by Professors Boyle and Stavans on dictionaries in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America. Requirements: advanced and/or near-native language skills. Taught by Professors Margaret Boyle (Bowdoin) and Ilan Stavans (Amherst). Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: SPAN 301 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 25 students. Fall semester: Professor Stavans.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Regina Galasso

TTH 08:30AM-09:50AM

Amherst College
SPAN-451-01-2122F

CHAP 204

rgalasso@amherst.edu
SPAN-451-01,LLAS-451-01

(Offered as SPAN 451 and LLAS 451) This course highlights literary connections between the United States and the Spanish-speaking world via translation. Through a study of texts from the late nineteenth century to the present, we will look at the role of translation in literary histories and current literary activities. We will examine how writers have translated in order to practice and enhance their creative writing. We will use translation as a way to access and analyze literary texts. We will also think about translation as professional and collaborative activities. We will study the work of José Martí (Cuba), Julia de Burgos (Puerto Rico), Silvina Ocampo (Argentina), Felipe Alfau (Catalonia-Spain), Salvador Dalí (Catalonia-Spain), Achy Obejas (Cuba), and Urayoán Noel (Puerto Rico), among others. In addition, we will explore ways of contributing with translational activities to our own literary landscape in the Amherst area by possibly collaborating with local institutions such as the Emily Dickinson Museum, the Eric Carle Museum, and the Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor.  Limited to 18 students. Fall Semester: Visiting Associate Professor Galasso.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115543

Ciruti 202

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
114989,115543,115533
This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
116218

Ciruti 217

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116219,116218,116220
This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

David Hernández

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
115546

Shattuck Hall 217

dhernand@mtholyoke.edu
114995,115546,115538
The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
114988

Reese 316

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
The course provides an overview of current and past social conditions of Latinas and Latinos within the U.S. We will address laws, policies and institutions that shape the complexity of Latinas'/os' social location and serve as critical sites of resistance. The course addresses legal constructions of race and citizenship, nomenclature, border politics, public health, education, and labor. We will consider the critical intersections of class, gender and sexuality as well as inequality in relation to other persons of color. Students will develop a firm sense of the importance and breadth of the Latina/o political agenda and acquire skills to think across social issues. With the help of a Community Based Learning (CBL) Mentor, students will explore various conceptions of "community" in Latina/o/x Studies through forums and discussions.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
114989

Ciruti 202

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
114989,115543,115533
This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 08:30AM-09:45AM

Mount Holyoke College
116219

Ciruti 217

vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116219,116218,116220
This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

David Hernández

MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
114995

Shattuck Hall 217

dhernand@mtholyoke.edu
114995,115546,115538
The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Cora Fernandez Anderson

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
115461

Kendade 203

canderso@mtholyoke.edu
Why has Latin America struggled to achieve democratic stability? Why is it the region of the world with the highest economic inequality? How have the periodic political and economic crises allowed for creative experimentation with policy alternatives to create a more equal and sustainable social order? This course examines the political and economic evolution and transformation of Latin America from the time of the European conquest until these very days, with a particular focus on the 20th century. It will also analyze how these general trends took specific shapes in each of the 7 countries studied: Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Chile, Venezuela and Bolivia.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Dana Leibsohn

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
ARH-204-01-202201

Neilson 102

dleibsoh@smith.edu
How do people of the present interpret the visual, material and urban cultures created in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans? To explore this question, this class focuses upon visual cultures and urban settings from across the Americas. Emphasis rests upon recent research — especially about the Inka, the Aztec, and their ancestors  but we will also study current debates in art history and archaeology. Among the themes we will discuss: sacrifice and rulership, representations of human and deified beings, the symbolic and economic meanings of materials and the ethics of excavation and museum display. Case studies include architectural complexes, textiles, ceramics and sculpted works from Peru, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. Southwest. Group A, Counts for ARU
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Javier Puente

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
LAS-201br-01-202201

Seelye 308

jpuente@smith.edu
This colloquium explores the socio-environmental trajectories of four crops in Latin America. From the deep history of potatoes to the dawn of transgenics, this course centers crops as a pivotal lens for examining the dynamics of capitalist development in the hemisphere. The first unit studies the potato and its contribution to the major demographic trends that remade the modern world. The second unit discusses histories of colonialism, sugar, slavery, and racialized capitalism. The third unit examines the establishment of banana agriculture as a mechanism of empire-making. The final unit unveils the emergence of GMOs and the centrality of Mexican maize.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Marguerite I. Harrison

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM

Smith College
POR-110-01-202201

Hatfield 104

mharriso@smith.edu
An introduction to spoken and written Brazilian Portuguese. Emphasis on the development of oral proficiency and acquisition of reading and writing skills. Students are introduced to the Portuguese-speaking world primarily through music from Brazil, Portugal, Angola, Mozambique and Cape Verde. Students will acquire knowledge in basic grammatical patterns and strategies in daily communication. Designed for students with no background in Portuguese.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malcolm Kenneth McNee

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
POR-125-01-202201

Hatfield 201

mmcnee@smith.edu
A one-semester introduction to Brazilian Portuguese designed for speakers of Spanish, aimed at basic proficiency in all four language modalities: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Classes are in Portuguese and students’ individual knowledge of Spanish supports the accelerated pace of the course, with contrastive approaches to pronunciation and grammar. The course also provides an introduction to aspects of the cultures of Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese-speaking Africa, with discussion of authentic audio-visual materials and short texts. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisite: Spanish placement test or SPN 220 or its equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Simone M. Gugliotta

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM

Smith College
POR-200-01-202201

Hatfield 201

sgugliot@smith.edu
This course will serve as a comprehensive grammar review with a focus on Brazilian media. In addition to a grammar textbook, we will be using several other sources to stimulate class discussion, as well as to improve reading comprehension, writing skills and vocabulary-building in Portuguese, including a selection of media forms and texts, websites, television, radio and film. Prerequisite: POR 100Y, POR 110 or POR 125 or the equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Marguerite I. Harrison

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM; F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
POR-220-01-202201

Hatfield 104; Capen Annex

mharriso@smith.edu
This course addresses a broad range of urban, social and cultural issues while also strengthening skills in oral expression, reading and writing, through the medium of short stories, essays, articles, images, music and film. In order to promote a hands-on approach to understanding culture, class assignments also encourage students to explore the Brazilian community in Boston. Prerequisite: POR 100Y or POR 125 or the equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Simone M. Gugliotta

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
POR-299-01-202201

Seelye 206

sgugliot@smith.edu
FRN 299-01, POR 299-01, ITL 299-01, SPN 299-01
Offered as ITL 299, POR 299, FRN 299 and SPN 299. The course explores the issues in world language instruction and research that are essential to the teaching of Romance languages. Special focus will be on understanding local, national and international multilingual communities as well as theories, methods, bilingualism, and heritage language studies. Topics include the history of Romance languages, how to teach grammar/vocabulary, the role of instructors, and feedback techniques. The critical framing provided will help students look at schools as cultural sites, centers of immigration and globalization. Class observations and scholarly readings help students understand the importance of research in the shaping of the pedagogical practice of world languages. Prerequisite: At least 4 semesters (or placement to equivalent level) of a Romance language taught at Smith (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or French). Enrollment limit of 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Silvia Berger

M W 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
SPN-220-01-202201

Seelye 211

sberger2@smith.edu
This is a high-intermediate course that aims at increasing students’ ability to communicate comfortably in Spanish (orally and in writing). The course explores an array of issues relevant to the Spanish-speaking world, and prepares students to think more critically and in depth about those issues, with the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of the target cultures. Materials used in the class include visual narratives (film), short stories, poems, plays and essays. Prerequisite: SPN 200 or Spanish Placement Exam (https://www.smith.edu/aboutsmith/ registrar/placement-exams). Enrollment limited to 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Silvia Berger

M W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
SPN-220-02-202201

Seelye 211

sberger2@smith.edu
This is a high-intermediate course that aims at increasing students’ ability to communicate comfortably in Spanish (orally and in writing). The course explores an array of issues relevant to the Spanish-speaking world, and prepares students to think more critically and in depth about those issues, with the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of the target cultures. Materials used in the class include visual narratives (film), short stories, poems, plays and essays. Prerequisite: SPN 200 or Spanish Placement Exam (https://www.smith.edu/aboutsmith/ registrar/placement-exams). Enrollment limited to 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michelle Joffroy

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
SPN-230dm-01-202201

Bass 103

mjoffroy@smith.edu
This course explores the realities and representation of women’s domestic labor from the thematic perspectives of precariousness (a condition and expression of subjectivity under globalization) and intimacy (understood as both an experience of affect and a condition of labor). This course uses short fiction, documentary and film from the Spanish-speaking world (the Americas and Spain) and the Portuguese-speaking world where appropriate, to explore the ways in which women’s transnational domestic labor has shaped new cultural subjects and political identities in the public as well as the private sphere. Students work on the theme of women’s domestic labor from the perspective of their choosing (for example, human rights, migration policies, racial and gendered labor regimes, neoliberal reforms and resistance). Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: SPN 220 or equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Estela Harretche

TU TH 1:20 PM - 2:35 PM

Smith College
SPN-240mj-01-202201

Ford 240

mharretc@smith.edu
In March of 2012, an initiative known as Women at Arts was launched in Buenos Aires. With a name based on the well-known phrase “men at arms,” it aims to use artistic innovation to initiate a debate over issues too often subject to an unbalanced approach. Mujeres de Artes Tomar dramatizes ideas related to gender, focuses on women as creators and explores art as an instrument of social transformation. The course will move thematically. Dramatic, musical, visual and poetic texts will be staged, each with a distinct focus and drawn from various disciplines. No previous acting experience needed. This course meets the writing requirement for the SPN Major.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Simone M. Gugliotta

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
SPN-299-01-202201

Seelye 206

sgugliot@smith.edu
FRN 299-01, POR 299-01, ITL 299-01, SPN 299-01
Offered as ITL 299, POR 299, FRN 299 and SPN 299. The course explores the issues in world language instruction and research that are essential to the teaching of Romance languages. Special focus will be on understanding local, national and international multilingual communities as well as theories, methods, bilingualism, and heritage language studies. Topics include the history of Romance languages, how to teach grammar/vocabulary, the role of instructors, and feedback techniques. The critical framing provided will help students look at schools as cultural sites, centers of immigration and globalization. Class observations and scholarly readings help students understand the importance of research in the shaping of the pedagogical practice of world languages. Prerequisite: At least 4 semesters (or placement to equivalent level) of a Romance language taught at Smith (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or French). Enrollment limit of 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Estela Harretche

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
SPN-375-01-202201

Ford 240

mharretc@smith.edu
This course has two principal aims: to develop public speaking and to enhance deeper understanding of repression, censorship and other forms of violence as they have made themselves felt in societies subject to dictatorship within the Spanish-speaking world. The objective is to give voice to that which has been silenced. Through multiple artistic means, visual and performing arts, including theater and music, we will reenact a past whose struggles remain unresolved, in order better to explain a conflicted present in today’s Spain and Latin America. For appropriate context, we will borrow from political science, history, sociology, and cultural geography. No previous activing experience needed. Enrollment limited to 12.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Heidi Scott

M W 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
15530

Integ. Learning Center N101

hvscott@history.umass.edu
General view of the cultural, economic, and political development of Latin America, 1492 to 1824. Topics include the Iberian and Indian backgrounds; Spanish and Portuguese imperial organization; role of Indians, Blacks, and Europeans in the New World; the coming of independence. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
22103

Integ. Learning Center N 111

General view of the cultural, economic, and political development of Latin America, 1492 to 1824. Topics include the Iberian and Indian backgrounds; Spanish and Portuguese imperial organization; role of Indians, Blacks, and Europeans in the New World; the coming of independence. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
22104

Integ. Learning Center N 111

General view of the cultural, economic, and political development of Latin America, 1492 to 1824. Topics include the Iberian and Indian backgrounds; Spanish and Portuguese imperial organization; role of Indians, Blacks, and Europeans in the New World; the coming of independence. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC
0.00

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
22105

Integ. Learning Center N101

General view of the cultural, economic, and political development of Latin America, 1492 to 1824. Topics include the Iberian and Indian backgrounds; Spanish and Portuguese imperial organization; role of Indians, Blacks, and Europeans in the New World; the coming of independence. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Joel Wolfe

M W 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15473

Integ. Learning Center N101

jwolfe@history.umass.edu
Lecture and discussion course examining the creation of modern Latin America, concentrating on the struggles over land and labor, the creation of nation-states, and the conflicts within those states over issues of citizenship and social justice. The course also addresses the contentious role the United States has played in the region. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
15474

Bartlett Hall room 109

Lecture and discussion course examining the creation of modern Latin America, concentrating on the struggles over land and labor, the creation of nation-states, and the conflicts within those states over issues of citizenship and social justice. The course also addresses the contentious role the United States has played in the region. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

F 1:25PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
15475

Bartlett Hall room 109

Lecture and discussion course examining the creation of modern Latin America, concentrating on the struggles over land and labor, the creation of nation-states, and the conflicts within those states over issues of citizenship and social justice. The course also addresses the contentious role the United States has played in the region. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC
0.00

F 2:30PM 3:20PM

UMass Amherst
15476

Bartlett Hall room 109

Lecture and discussion course examining the creation of modern Latin America, concentrating on the struggles over land and labor, the creation of nation-states, and the conflicts within those states over issues of citizenship and social justice. The course also addresses the contentious role the United States has played in the region. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Kevin Young

M W 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15589

Bartlett Hall room 61

kayoung@umass.edu
Why have poverty and inequality proven so persistent in modern Latin American history? What strategies have people proposed to deal with these problems, and with what consequences? This course surveys the major periods in Latin American and Caribbean economic development, focusing on the last 150 years: the liberal export era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the state-led industrialization efforts of the mid-twentieth century, experimentation with radical alternatives to capitalism in Cuba and elsewhere, the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and after, and recent attempts to forge alternatives to neoliberalism. We'll look at the views of politicians, intellectuals, and businesspeople, but also at those of workers, women, indigenous people, migrants, and others typically marginalized in public debate. No prior experience with Latin American history or economics is necessary. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AA
0.00

F 9:05AM 9:55AM

UMass Amherst
15704

Bartlett Hall room 3

Why have poverty and inequality proven so persistent in modern Latin American history? What strategies have people proposed to deal with these problems, and with what consequences? This course surveys the major periods in Latin American and Caribbean economic development, focusing on the last 150 years: the liberal export era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the state-led industrialization efforts of the mid-twentieth century, experimentation with radical alternatives to capitalism in Cuba and elsewhere, the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and after, and recent attempts to forge alternatives to neoliberalism. We'll look at the views of politicians, intellectuals, and businesspeople, but also at those of workers, women, indigenous people, migrants, and others typically marginalized in public debate. No prior experience with Latin American history or economics is necessary. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AB
0.00

F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
15705

Bartlett Hall room 109

Why have poverty and inequality proven so persistent in modern Latin American history? What strategies have people proposed to deal with these problems, and with what consequences? This course surveys the major periods in Latin American and Caribbean economic development, focusing on the last 150 years: the liberal export era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the state-led industrialization efforts of the mid-twentieth century, experimentation with radical alternatives to capitalism in Cuba and elsewhere, the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and after, and recent attempts to forge alternatives to neoliberalism. We'll look at the views of politicians, intellectuals, and businesspeople, but also at those of workers, women, indigenous people, migrants, and others typically marginalized in public debate. No prior experience with Latin American history or economics is necessary. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01AC
0.00

F 12:20PM 1:10PM

UMass Amherst
15706

Elm Room 212

Why have poverty and inequality proven so persistent in modern Latin American history? What strategies have people proposed to deal with these problems, and with what consequences? This course surveys the major periods in Latin American and Caribbean economic development, focusing on the last 150 years: the liberal export era of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the state-led industrialization efforts of the mid-twentieth century, experimentation with radical alternatives to capitalism in Cuba and elsewhere, the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and after, and recent attempts to forge alternatives to neoliberalism. We'll look at the views of politicians, intellectuals, and businesspeople, but also at those of workers, women, indigenous people, migrants, and others typically marginalized in public debate. No prior experience with Latin American history or economics is necessary. (Gen. Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Young

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
15711

Herter Hall room 211

kayoung@umass.edu
Why have ordinary Latin Americans joined social movements, often at high personal risk? How and when have those movements achieved their goals, and what common obstacles have they faced? What factors have influenced the forms and strategies that movements adopt? This course surveys the history of Latin American and Caribbean social movements from the late nineteenth century to the present day, seeking to identify key patterns and lessons in the process. Some of the case studies will include labor movements in twentieth-century Chile and Cuba, peasant/indigenous movements in Mexico and the Andes, feminist and LGBTQ movements in Brazil and Honduras, mobilization against military dictatorship in Argentina in the 1970s, the transnational campaigns against U.S. intervention in Central America in the 1980s, and recent struggles in defense of natural resources and the environment. We will also consider some of the groups who have mobilized in opposition to these movements.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Justin Gross

TU 2:30PM 5:00PM

UMass Amherst
23159

Machmer Hall room W-22

jhgross@umass.edu
Latinos in the United States and the U.S. in Latin America. This course introduces students to the political history, identities, behavior, and activism of Latinx (Latino/a, Hispanic) populations of the United States, placed within the broader context of U.S. engagement with Latin America. We will consider distinct experiences of those with roots in different parts of Latin America and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, (such as, e.g., Mexico, Central America, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic) as well as historical and contemporary factors that have helped forge a shared identity for many despite their diverse backgrounds. Specific topics may include civic engagement and voting, ideology and partisanship, activism and mass mobilization, racialization of and discrimination toward Latinx communities, Latino/as and culture war politics, involvement in state and local politics, and the impact of demographic trends and multi-ethnic, multi-racial coalitions on political participation and power.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Priscilla Page

M W 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
22196

New Africa House room 3

pmpage@theater.umass.edu
This course will examine the landscape of American theater and its relationship to the politics of diversity in the U.S. We will study the theater work of Latinos/as in the U.S. to broaden our understanding of multicultural theater. In addition to studying the dramatic texts, we will also consider the political implications of the work and its relationship to social activism. We will also look at theater companies whose primary missions are to produce Latino/a theater and the history of the representation of Latinos on stage in this country.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Resources

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies (LACLS) has a long and distinguished history in the Five Colleges (the University of Massachusetts–Amherst, and Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges). For over three decades, the main goal of FCLACLS has been to promote the multi- and inter-disciplinary study of Latin America.

With respect to the individual programs, the University of Massachusetts–Amherst Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies offers an undergraduate certificate, a graduate certificate and a minor. The Mount Holyoke College and Smith College Latin American Studies Programs offer a major and minor. At Hampshire College, students may develop an area of specialization in Latin American Studies in conjunction with or in addition to their area of concentration. At Amherst College, students may design a major in Latin American Studies.

FCLACLS Certificate

The FCLACLS Council administers the Five College Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies Certificate. The requirements include the successful (a grade of B or higher) completion of eight one-semester courses selected from five different areas. The five areas are a broadly based introductory course on the social and political history of Latin America, a social science course, a humanities course, four advanced elective courses and an interdisciplinary senior seminar. Language training is crucial. Certificates are awarded only after having demonstrated proficiency through at least the advanced intermediate level in Spanish, Portuguese or an indigenous language of the Americas. Students are encouraged to take advantage of cross-enrollment opportunities at the other colleges.

UMass Undergraduate Certificate

The undergraduate certificate and minor at UMass allow students to develop a concentration in LACLS as a complement to their disciplinary major. The certificate program offers two options, one emphasizing competence (at the advanced intermediate level) in both Spanish and Portuguese, the other, one language and a greater number (six rather than four) of area studies courses. The area studies courses must be from at least three different disciplines. Both tracks require an advanced interdisciplinary seminar. The minor requires six area studies courses. Students may major in LAS through the Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration program.

Latin American Studies Minor and Certificate at UMass

Mount Holyoke College Major and Minor Programs

The LAS major at MHC requires a minimum of 10 courses of which at least half must be at the advanced level; the minor requires a minimum of five. Among the required courses is an introductory course in either Latin American cultures or economies, one advanced literature course and a course focusing on less studied Latin American social groups. The program requires a command of Spanish or Portuguese at the advanced intermediate level and recommends at least an elementary knowledge of the other language. At Smith, the LAS major is anchored by a core set of four required courses in literature and history that provide the foundation for in-depth interdisciplinary study. Students must complete an additional six courses at the intermediate or advanced level, with two of these in the social sciences and at least one in the arts. A proficiency in Spanish at the advanced intermediate level is required and reading knowledge of Portuguese is recommended. The LAS Minor requires six courses. At Amherst College students develop their own major in LAS by writing a senior honor’s thesis in consultation with three advisors. At Hampshire, which does not have majors and minors, students develop a concentration in Latin America by writing their required senior honor’s thesis on a relevant topic and through an appropriate selection of inter-disciplinary courses.

Latin American Studies at Mount Holyoke

The Graduate Program at UMass

The graduate certificate at UMass is intended to structure graduate study with a LAS focus, foster interdisciplinary scholarship and promote foreign language competence. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in a regular disciplinary or professional master’s or Ph.D. program. Candidates must complete a minimum of four graduate area study courses in three disciplines, demonstrate language proficiency at the advanced intermediate level, complete a thesis or dissertation on a Latin American theme and present their research results in the CLACLS Research Workshop.

Graduate Certificate in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies at UMass

Five College Libraries

The total size of the Five College Latin American collection is in excess of 225,000 volumes, placing it among the 20 largest LAS collections nationwide, a true gem for undergraduates. The Pauline P. Collins Collection at UMass numbers 200,000+ volumes, over half of these in Spanish and Portuguese. The four colleges have not enumerated their Latin American acquisitions, but an analysis of their Latin American holdings (by LC call numbers) in Latin American history and literature yields a total of 25,812 volumes.

Five College Library Catalog

The Lorna M. Peterson Prize

The Lorna M. Peterson Prize supports scholarly and creative work by undergraduate students taking part in Five College programs. The $500 prize is awarded annually based on nominations from Five College programs.

Contact Us

Council Chair:

Javier Puente, Assistant Professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies, Smith College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator

Connect:

Join our email list!