Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

The Five College Certificate in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies enhances rather than replaces the more traditional major, minor or certificate available at the individual schools and can complement the student's major field of study.

Under the guidance of an appointed faculty adviser for the program at each campus, students design a sequential, coordinated and comprehensive course of study drawing on the faculty specialists and course offerings at the five campuses. The program is overseen by the Five College Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies Council, whose members include faculty representatives from each campus.

Any degree-seeking student is eligible to earn the certificate. Interested students must consult initially with an advisor for the program at their own home campus, to confirm their eligibility and plan out an appropriate course of study. The home-campus advisor for the program also determines whether a student has met the requirements, and recommends the award of a formal certificate, which is recorded on the student's transcript. Completed applications for the certificate must be signed by the home campus adviser, who will bring the application to the FCLACLS Certificate Program committee.

On This Page

Faculty

Lloyd Barba*- Latinx and Latin American Studies, Religion
Rhonda Cobham-Sander - Black Studies, English, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Sony Coráñez Bolton - Latinx and Latin American Studies, Spanish
Javier Corrales - Political Science (Chair) and Latinx and Latin American Studies
Solsiree del Moral - Black Studies (Chair), American Studies, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Rick A. Lopez - Latinx and Latin American Studies (Chair), History, Environmental Studies; Dean of New Students
Leah Schmalzbauer - American Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Latinx and Latin American Studies
Paul Schroeder Rodríguez - Latinx and Latin American Studies, Spanish, Film and Media Studies

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Roosbelinda Cardenas - Latin American Studies and Anthropology
Margaret Cerullo* - Sociology
Norman Holland - Hispano Literature (Emeritus)
Susana Loza - Critical Race, Gender, and Media Studies
Flavio Risech-Ozeguera - Law (Emeritus)
Monique Roelofs - Philosophy (Emerita)
Wilson Valentín Escobar - Sociology and American Studies

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Justin Crumbaugh - Spanish, Latino/a, Latin American Studies
Lowell Gudmundson - Latin American Studies and History (Emeritus)
Christian Gundermann - Gender Studies
David Hernández - Latino/a Studies
Lynn Morgan - Anthropology (Emeritus)
Dorothy Mosby - Spanish; Interim Dean of Faculty and Vice President for Academic Affairs
Eva Paus - Economics
Adriana Pitetta* - Spanish

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero - Anthropology
Ginetta E.B. Candelario - Sociology, Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Velma Garcia - Government
Maria Estela Harretche - Spanish
Marguerite Itamar Harrison - Spanish and Portuguese
Michelle Joffroy - Spanish
Elizabeth Klarich - Anthropology
Dana Leibsohn - Art, Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Malcolm McNee - Spanish and Portuguese
Javier Puente* - Latin American and Latino/a Studies
Maria Helena Rueda - Spanish
Lester Tomé - Dance

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Sonia Alvarez - Political Science
Luiz Amaral - Spanish and Portuguese Linguistics
Benjamin Bailey - Communication
Whitney Battle-Baptiste - Anthropology
Angelica Bernal - Political Science
James K. Boyce - Economics (Emeritus)
Laura Briggs - Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Mari Castaneda - Communication
Leda Cooks - Communication
N.C. Christopher Couch - Comparative Literature
Emiliana Cruz - Anthropology
Alexandrina Deschamps - Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Carlene Edie - Political Science
Gerald Epstein - Economics
Harley Erdman - Theater
Martin Espada - English
Stephanie Fetta* - Spanish and Portuguese Studies
Martha Fuentes-Bautista - Communication
Patricia Galvis Assmus - Art, Architecture, and Art History (Emerita)
Agustin Lao-Montes - Sociology & Afro-American Studies
Jennifer Lundquist - Sociology
Claudio Moreira - Communication
Michael J. Morgan - Communication (Emeritus)
Leonce Ndikumana - Economics
Jose Ornelas - Spanish and Portuguese Literature (Emeritus)
Daphne Patai - Spanish and Portuguese Literature (Emerita)
J. Mohan Rao - Economics (Emeritus)
Margara Russotto - Latin American Literature and Culture
Felipe Salles - Music and Dance
Heidi Scott - History
Millie Thayer - Sociology
Jacqueline Urla - Anthropology
Laura Valdiviezo - College of Education

*Certificate Advisor & Steering Committee Member

Certificate Requirements

To earn a FCLACLS Certificate, students must complete successfully a minimum of eight one-semester courses selected from five different areas; fulfill a specified language requirement; and achieve at least a grade of “B” in the minimum number of courses taken toward the certificate. Courses may be taken at any of the campuses but must be approved in advance by the student's home-campus advisor for the program. Completed applications for the certificate must be signed by the home campus advisor, who will bring the application to the Five College LACLS Council meeting in April.

Courses

Eight full courses or educational activities (each 3–4 credits or equivalent) must be completed within the following areas:

  1. A broadly based introductory course on the social and political history of Latin America or U.S. Latinos
  2. One course in the social sciences that focuses substantially on Latin America or U.S. Latinos (including courses in anthropology, economics, geography, political science, etc.)
  3. One course in the humanities that focuses substantially on Latin America or U.S. Latinos (including courses in art, art history, dance, folklore, literature, music, philosophy, religion or theater, etc. )
  4. Four other courses that should be more advanced and more specific in focus
  5. One upper-level seminar in Latin America and/or U.S. Latinos
  6. Those students who begin their studies during or after fall 2013 will be required to have, within all of their courses, at least one course in Latino Studies and at least one course in Latin American or Caribbean Studies
  7. At least one course must be taken at one of the institutions in the Five College consortium other than the student's home campus.

Language Requirement

Proficiency through second-year college level in an official (other than English) or indigenous language of Latin America.

Minimum Standard

To receive the certificate, the student must receive a grade of “B” or better in every course that qualifies for the minimum certificate requirement.

Study Abroad

The Council will accept relevant study abroad courses, as long as they are accepted for credit or equivalent by a student’s home institution. If no grade is reported on the transcript, the Council will waive the “B” grade requirement for courses taken abroad.

Courses

Many courses in addition to those listed below may be eligible for fulfilling the requirements of the Five College Latin American, Caribbean & Latino Studies Certificate. Students are encouraged to consult an LACLS Program campus advisor to identify courses that are appropriate for their interests.

Spring 2022 Latin American, Caribbean, & Latino Studies Courses

01
4.00

Paul A. Schroeder Rodriguez

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM

Amherst College
AMST-206-01-2122S
pschroeder@amherst.edu
LLAS-200-01, AMST-206-01

(Offered as LLAS 200 and AMST 206) In this course students will become familiar with the major debates that have animated Latinx and Latin American Studies, addressing a wide range of issues from the Conquest to the present. Each week students will focus on specific questions such as: Does Latin America have a common culture? Is Latin America part of the Western world? Is Latinx a race or an ethnicity? Is U.S. Latinx identity rooted in Latin America or the United States? Are Latin American nations post-colonial? Was the modern concept of race invented in the Caribbean at the time of the Conquest? The opposing viewpoints around such questions will provide the main focus of the reading assignments, which will average two or three articles per week. In the first four weeks, students will learn a methodology for analyzing, contextualizing, and making arguments that they will apply in developing their own positions in the specific controversies that will make up the rest of the course.

Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Schroeder Rodriguez. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
ARCH-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
ARHA-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Watufani M. Poe

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
BLST-226-01-2122S
wpoe@amherst.edu
BLST-226-01, LLAS-226-01, SWAG-226-01

(Offered as BLST 226[D], LLAS 226 and SWAG 226) This course focuses on Black Queer and Trans life and struggle as well as the cultural and intellectual contributions Black Queer and Trans have made to in numerous fields throughout the Americas (North and South). While for many years narratives of the lives of Black LGBTQ people have been silenced and erased due to stigma and intersectional oppression on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality, scholars and artists in the past four decades have worked to recover the stories of Black Queer and Trans communities throughout the diaspora. The Black Queer/Trans Americas will dive into works that highlight these cultural contributions, while also understanding the compounded systemic violence that Black LGBTQ communities have faced and continue to face. By the end of this course students will have a strong understanding of how systems of power work to restrict the freedoms of Black Queer and Trans communities, and how Black LGBTQ people have lived, organized, and created in spite of and in response to these oppressions. This interdisciplinary undergraduate upper level course will utilize academic texts accompanied by poetry, fiction, film, television, and visual art to understand Black Queer and Trans subjectivities. In addition to course materials, the class will also make use of presentations from local artists, activists, and community members in the local area to add to the course experience. Every week will focus on a different theme or field of study related to Black LGBTQ+ life. 

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Poe.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Russell Lohse

W 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
BLST-363-01-2122S
klohse@amherst.edu
BLST-363-01, HIST-463-01, LLAS-463-01

(Offered as BLST 363 [CLA], HIST 463 [AF/TC/TE/TS/TR/P] and LLAS 463) In this course students will consult, analyze, and employ a variety of sources, including the accounts of missionaries, journals of slave traders, the Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, and the few available slave narratives written by Africans. Students will be presented with the tools to write original research on topics including the involvement of Western African societies in the slave trade, the logistics of the Middle Passage, characteristics of the captives transported from Africa to the Americas, and the Africans' own experiences of the Middle Passage and adaptation to the slave régimes of the Americas. Students will write a series of short assignments leading up to a major research paper of 20-25 pages.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paul A. Schroeder Rodriguez

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
COLQ-461-01-2122S
pschroeder@amherst.edu
COLQ-461-01, SPAN-461-01

(Offered as COLQ 461 and SPAN 461) In this particular research tutorial we will ask how specific film practices help normalize racist vs. anti-racist structures of feeling. We will begin with a few key historical and theoretical texts on the long-term construction of racist and anti-racist structures of feeling in Latin America and in U.S. Latinx cultures, to then explore how these are reproduced or contested in a handful of films where racism and anti-racism are at the center of the filmic text, narratively and/or audiovisually. The selection of films will be made collaboratively, as will the subsequent research and the chosen end-product, for example an academic essay, a scholarly review essay, a digital resource for teachers, and/or media activism. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

This course is a research tutorial, listed in the catalog as colloquia for juniors and seniors, and is part of a tutorial series that engages Amherst students in substantive research with faculty in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. By exploring how different scholars approach a topic, students learn to frame a research question, develop research strategies, and identify and use sources. Students enrolled in these courses are guaranteed funding for at least six weeks of work during the summer following the academic year in which they take the course.

Open to sophomores and juniors. Limited to 6 students. Spring Semester. Professor Schroeder Rodriguez.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Ilan Stavans

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
EUST-233-01-2122S
istavans@amherst.edu

(Offered as SPAN 384 and EUST 233) This panoramic, interdisciplinary course will explore the concept of love as it changes epoch to epoch and culture to culture. Poetry, novels, paintings, sculptures, movies, TV, and music will be featured. Starting with the Song of Songs, it will include discussions of Plato, Aristotle, Catullus, and other Greek classics, move on to Dante and Petrarch, contemplate Chinese, Arabic, African, and Mesoamerican literatures, devote a central unit to Shakespeare, continue with the Metaphysical poets, and move on to American literature. Special attention will be paid to the difference between love, eroticism, and pornography. Multilingual students will be encouraged to delve into various linguistic traditions, in tongues like French, Russian, German, Yiddish, and Spanish. Conducted in English.

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Stavans.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Rick A. Lopez

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
HIST-263-01-2122S
ralopez@amherst.edu
HIST-263-01, LLAS-263-01

(Offered as HIST 263 [LA/TE/TR/TS] and LLAS 263) Latin Americans began their struggle for democracy during the independence wars at the start of the nineteenth century. Their struggle continues today. This course considers the historical meanings of democracy in various Latin American countries, with particular attention to the relationship between liberalism and democracy in the nineteenth century; the broadening of democracy at the start of the twentieth century; the rise and fall of military dictatorships in the 1960s–1980s and their impact upon civil society; and the current clashes between neo-liberal economic programs and the neo-populist resurgence of the left. Readings and discussions will focus on the ways broad economic and political shifts impacted individuals' lives; how each economic class experienced these shifts differently; the way race and gender have shaped peoples' experience with democratization and repression; and the personal processes of radicalization by which individuals became inspired to take risks in their struggle for inclusion and against repression. Because the approach is thematic and chronological, some countries and regions will receive more attention than others. Meetings and readings will draw on secondary studies, historical documents, testimonials, music, images, and film. Two meetings per week.

Spring Semester. Professor López.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Russell Lohse

W 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
HIST-463-01-2122S
klohse@amherst.edu
BLST-363-01, HIST-463-01, LLAS-463-01

(Offered as BLST 363 [CLA], HIST 463 [AF/TC/TE/TS/TR/P] and LLAS 463) In this course students will consult, analyze, and employ a variety of sources, including the accounts of missionaries, journals of slave traders, the Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, and the few available slave narratives written by Africans. Students will be presented with the tools to write original research on topics including the involvement of Western African societies in the slave trade, the logistics of the Middle Passage, characteristics of the captives transported from Africa to the Americas, and the Africans' own experiences of the Middle Passage and adaptation to the slave régimes of the Americas. Students will write a series of short assignments leading up to a major research paper of 20-25 pages.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lloyd D. Barba

MW 04:00 PM-05:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-130-01-2122S
lbarba@amherst.edu
RELI-130-01, LLAS-130-01

(Offered as RELI 130and LLAS 130) On the dawn of the quincentenary of the Protestant Reformation, the April 2013 cover story of Time Magazine heralded the “Latino Reformation.” After 500 years of religious contact, conflict, and conversions throughout the Americas, “Latino USA” is undergoing unprecedented religious transformations. Latinxs, now comprising the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, are largely responsible for the new expressions of Abrahamic religious traditions in the country. This course is a historical survey of the growing and diverse U.S. Latinx religious experiences. The chronology of the course will begin with pre-contact Indian religions and cultures, then follow with an examination of Iberian Catholic and Indian contact cultures, Catholic and Protestant migrations into the U.S., and the negotiation and representation of Latinx religious identities today.

Spring semester. Assistant Professor Barba.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paul A. Schroeder Rodriguez

TTH 03:00 PM-04:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-200-01-2122S
pschroeder@amherst.edu
LLAS-200-01, AMST-206-01

(Offered as LLAS 200 and AMST 206) In this course students will become familiar with the major debates that have animated Latinx and Latin American Studies, addressing a wide range of issues from the Conquest to the present. Each week students will focus on specific questions such as: Does Latin America have a common culture? Is Latin America part of the Western world? Is Latinx a race or an ethnicity? Is U.S. Latinx identity rooted in Latin America or the United States? Are Latin American nations post-colonial? Was the modern concept of race invented in the Caribbean at the time of the Conquest? The opposing viewpoints around such questions will provide the main focus of the reading assignments, which will average two or three articles per week. In the first four weeks, students will learn a methodology for analyzing, contextualizing, and making arguments that they will apply in developing their own positions in the specific controversies that will make up the rest of the course.

Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Schroeder Rodriguez. 

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Gabriel A. Arboleda

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-204-01-2122S
garboleda@amherst.edu
ARCH-204-01, ARHA-204-01, LLAS-204-01

(Offered as ARCH 204, ARHA 204, and LLAS 204) This course studies the theory, policy, and practice of low-income housing in marginalized communities worldwide. We study central concepts in housing theory, key issues regarding low-income housing, different approaches to address these issues, and political debates around housing the poor. We use a comparative focus, going back and forth between the cases of the United States and the so-called developing world. By doing this, we engage in a “theory from without” exercise: We attempt to understand the housing problem in the United States from the perspective of the developing world, and vice versa. We study our subject through illustrated lectures, seminar discussions, documentary films, visual analysis exercises, and a field trip.

Limited to 20 students. Spring Semester. Professor Arboleda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Carmen C. Granda

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-205-01-2122S
cgranda@amherst.edu
SPAN-205-01, LLAS-205-01

(Offered as SPAN 205 and LLAS 205) Heritage learners of Spanish are students who have grown up speaking, listening, reading and/or writing Spanish with family or in their community. Because of their unique backgrounds, Spanish heritage language learners (SHLLs) are bilingual and bicultural. They function between a Hispanic and an American identity. This fluid and multiple identity can bring challenges, as SHLLs try to fit into both groups. With this in mind, through meaningful activities that focus on students’ experiences and emotions, this Spanish language course will center on bilingualism, specifically through writing, as a necessary means for identity formation. Because in narrating our stories with others, we enact our identities, this course will connect students with the bilingual community in Amherst or Holyoke. Through this course, students will incorporate their personal experience as SHLLs into their coursework. Activities will foster critical thinking, and students will learn to analyze, read, discuss, write, and reflect on issues of language, culture, and identity. Using a student-centered approach, the course will include collaborative brainstorming, free-writing, developing topics of personal importance, and peer and group editing in order to develop students’ writing proficiency and to build community.

This course prepares Spanish heritage language students for advanced-level courses offered by the Spanish Department. Limited to 18 students per section. This course may be counted toward the Spanish Major. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish, though some assignments can be submitted in English. Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202 or placement exam.

Consent Required (students must identify as Spanish heritage language students). Spring Semester. Senior Lecturer Granda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Watufani M. Poe

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-226-01-2122S
wpoe@amherst.edu
BLST-226-01, LLAS-226-01, SWAG-226-01

(Offered as BLST 226[D], LLAS 226 and SWAG 226) This course focuses on Black Queer and Trans life and struggle as well as the cultural and intellectual contributions Black Queer and Trans have made to in numerous fields throughout the Americas (North and South). While for many years narratives of the lives of Black LGBTQ people have been silenced and erased due to stigma and intersectional oppression on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality, scholars and artists in the past four decades have worked to recover the stories of Black Queer and Trans communities throughout the diaspora. The Black Queer/Trans Americas will dive into works that highlight these cultural contributions, while also understanding the compounded systemic violence that Black LGBTQ communities have faced and continue to face. By the end of this course students will have a strong understanding of how systems of power work to restrict the freedoms of Black Queer and Trans communities, and how Black LGBTQ people have lived, organized, and created in spite of and in response to these oppressions. This interdisciplinary undergraduate upper level course will utilize academic texts accompanied by poetry, fiction, film, television, and visual art to understand Black Queer and Trans subjectivities. In addition to course materials, the class will also make use of presentations from local artists, activists, and community members in the local area to add to the course experience. Every week will focus on a different theme or field of study related to Black LGBTQ+ life. 

Limited to 20 students. Spring semester. Professor Poe.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Rick A. Lopez

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-263-01-2122S
ralopez@amherst.edu
HIST-263-01, LLAS-263-01

(Offered as HIST 263 [LA/TE/TR/TS] and LLAS 263) Latin Americans began their struggle for democracy during the independence wars at the start of the nineteenth century. Their struggle continues today. This course considers the historical meanings of democracy in various Latin American countries, with particular attention to the relationship between liberalism and democracy in the nineteenth century; the broadening of democracy at the start of the twentieth century; the rise and fall of military dictatorships in the 1960s–1980s and their impact upon civil society; and the current clashes between neo-liberal economic programs and the neo-populist resurgence of the left. Readings and discussions will focus on the ways broad economic and political shifts impacted individuals' lives; how each economic class experienced these shifts differently; the way race and gender have shaped peoples' experience with democratization and repression; and the personal processes of radicalization by which individuals became inspired to take risks in their struggle for inclusion and against repression. Because the approach is thematic and chronological, some countries and regions will receive more attention than others. Meetings and readings will draw on secondary studies, historical documents, testimonials, music, images, and film. Two meetings per week.

Spring Semester. Professor López.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Sara J. Brenneis

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
LLAS-301-01-2122S
sbrenneis@amherst.edu
SPAN-301-01, LLAS-301-01

(Offered as SPAN 301 and LLAS 301) This course provides an introduction to the diverse literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world over the course of six centuries, from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Students will learn the tools, language, and critical vocabulary for advanced work reading the canon of Hispanic literatures from Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean Basin, identifying aesthetic trends, historical periods and diverse genres such as poetry, narrative, theater and film. The syllabus will include a wide variety of authors of different national, political, and artistic persuasions and an array of linguistic styles. This course prepares students for advanced work in Spanish and for study abroad.

Requisite SPAN 202 or Spanish Placement Exam. Proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish are required. Limited to 20 students per section. Fall semester: Visiting Professor Porter.  Spring semester: Professor Brenneis.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-357-01-2122S
jsnaranjo@amherst.edu
SPAN-357-01, LLAS-357-01

(Offered as SPAN 357 and LLAS 357) Spanish is the second-most widely spoken language in the world. With more than 400 million native speakers, it has official status in 21 countries. In the United States more than 40 million people use Spanish in their daily lives. What exactly is the Spanish language? What do you actually know when you speak Spanish? These questions are at the heart of this course. By following a bottom-up design—from smallest to largest segments of language—we will understand the basic characteristics of human language and will examine the architecture of the Spanish language: how its sounds are produced and how they combine; how its words are constructed from their component parts; how its sentences are formed; how its meanings are understood; and how its use reflects aspects of our socio-cultural behavior. As an approach to the formal study of the Spanish language, we will explore actual and diverse language data such as texts, speech samples, and songs to grasp complex linguistic phenomena. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or permission of instructor. Limited to 18 students. Fall and spring semesters. Professor Sánchez-Naranjo.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Russell Lohse

W 02:30 PM-05:30 PM

Amherst College
LLAS-463-01-2122S
klohse@amherst.edu
BLST-363-01, HIST-463-01, LLAS-463-01

(Offered as BLST 363 [CLA], HIST 463 [AF/TC/TE/TS/TR/P] and LLAS 463) In this course students will consult, analyze, and employ a variety of sources, including the accounts of missionaries, journals of slave traders, the Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, and the few available slave narratives written by Africans. Students will be presented with the tools to write original research on topics including the involvement of Western African societies in the slave trade, the logistics of the Middle Passage, characteristics of the captives transported from Africa to the Americas, and the Africans' own experiences of the Middle Passage and adaptation to the slave régimes of the Americas. Students will write a series of short assignments leading up to a major research paper of 20-25 pages.

Limited to 18 students. Spring semester. Professor Lohse.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lloyd D. Barba

MW 04:00 PM-05:20 PM

Amherst College
RELI-130-01-2122S
lbarba@amherst.edu
RELI-130-01, LLAS-130-01

(Offered as RELI 130and LLAS 130) On the dawn of the quincentenary of the Protestant Reformation, the April 2013 cover story of Time Magazine heralded the “Latino Reformation.” After 500 years of religious contact, conflict, and conversions throughout the Americas, “Latino USA” is undergoing unprecedented religious transformations. Latinxs, now comprising the largest ethnic minority group in the United States, are largely responsible for the new expressions of Abrahamic religious traditions in the country. This course is a historical survey of the growing and diverse U.S. Latinx religious experiences. The chronology of the course will begin with pre-contact Indian religions and cultures, then follow with an examination of Iberian Catholic and Indian contact cultures, Catholic and Protestant migrations into the U.S., and the negotiation and representation of Latinx religious identities today.

Spring semester. Assistant Professor Barba.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Carmen C. Granda

MW 01:30 PM-02:50 PM

Amherst College
SPAN-205-01-2122S
cgranda@amherst.edu
SPAN-205-01, LLAS-205-01

(Offered as SPAN 205 and LLAS 205) Heritage learners of Spanish are students who have grown up speaking, listening, reading and/or writing Spanish with family or in their community. Because of their unique backgrounds, Spanish heritage language learners (SHLLs) are bilingual and bicultural. They function between a Hispanic and an American identity. This fluid and multiple identity can bring challenges, as SHLLs try to fit into both groups. With this in mind, through meaningful activities that focus on students’ experiences and emotions, this Spanish language course will center on bilingualism, specifically through writing, as a necessary means for identity formation. Because in narrating our stories with others, we enact our identities, this course will connect students with the bilingual community in Amherst or Holyoke. Through this course, students will incorporate their personal experience as SHLLs into their coursework. Activities will foster critical thinking, and students will learn to analyze, read, discuss, write, and reflect on issues of language, culture, and identity. Using a student-centered approach, the course will include collaborative brainstorming, free-writing, developing topics of personal importance, and peer and group editing in order to develop students’ writing proficiency and to build community.

This course prepares Spanish heritage language students for advanced-level courses offered by the Spanish Department. Limited to 18 students per section. This course may be counted toward the Spanish Major. The class will be conducted entirely in Spanish, though some assignments can be submitted in English. Prerequisite: SPAN 201, SPAN 202 or placement exam.

Consent Required (students must identify as Spanish heritage language students). Spring Semester. Senior Lecturer Granda.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Sara J. Brenneis

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
SPAN-301-01-2122S
sbrenneis@amherst.edu
SPAN-301-01, LLAS-301-01

(Offered as SPAN 301 and LLAS 301) This course provides an introduction to the diverse literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world over the course of six centuries, from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Students will learn the tools, language, and critical vocabulary for advanced work reading the canon of Hispanic literatures from Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean Basin, identifying aesthetic trends, historical periods and diverse genres such as poetry, narrative, theater and film. The syllabus will include a wide variety of authors of different national, political, and artistic persuasions and an array of linguistic styles. This course prepares students for advanced work in Spanish and for study abroad.

Requisite SPAN 202 or Spanish Placement Exam. Proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish are required. Limited to 20 students per section. Fall semester: Visiting Professor Porter.  Spring semester: Professor Brenneis.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Jeannette Sanchez-Naranjo

TTH 01:00 PM-02:20 PM

Amherst College
SPAN-357-01-2122S
jsnaranjo@amherst.edu
SPAN-357-01, LLAS-357-01

(Offered as SPAN 357 and LLAS 357) Spanish is the second-most widely spoken language in the world. With more than 400 million native speakers, it has official status in 21 countries. In the United States more than 40 million people use Spanish in their daily lives. What exactly is the Spanish language? What do you actually know when you speak Spanish? These questions are at the heart of this course. By following a bottom-up design—from smallest to largest segments of language—we will understand the basic characteristics of human language and will examine the architecture of the Spanish language: how its sounds are produced and how they combine; how its words are constructed from their component parts; how its sentences are formed; how its meanings are understood; and how its use reflects aspects of our socio-cultural behavior. As an approach to the formal study of the Spanish language, we will explore actual and diverse language data such as texts, speech samples, and songs to grasp complex linguistic phenomena. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or permission of instructor. Limited to 18 students. Fall and spring semesters. Professor Sánchez-Naranjo.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Ilan Stavans

TTH 10:00 AM-11:20 AM

Amherst College
SPAN-441-01-2122S
istavans@amherst.edu

A thorough, in-depth exploration of the life and works of Mexican nun Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), the most important Latin American writer and thinker of the colonial period and one of the region’s most influential figures overall. The focus will be on the three choices seventeenth-century colonial women faced: marriage, the convent, and the court. We will study churches, convents, and monasteries from religious, political, social, and dietary perspectives. There will be close readings of Sor Juana’s poetry, theater, philosophical disquisitions, autobiographical writing, and theological debates regarding Athanasius Kircher, Erasmus of Rotterdam, and René Descartes. Sor Juana’s afterlife as a feminist and contemporary pop icon will also be studied, as will similar Iberian and Latin American religious writers such as Santa Teresa de Jesús, Fray San Juan de la Cruz, Fray Luis de León, Juan Ruíz de Alarcón and Carlos de Singüenza y Góngora. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or consent of the instructor.  Limited to 25 students. Spring Semester: Professor Stavans.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Megan Saltzman

MW 04:00 PM-05:20 PM

Amherst College
SPAN-448-01-2122S
msaltzman@amherst.edu
SPAN-448-01, LLAS-448-01

(Offered as SPAN-448 and LLAS-448) With a historical and transnational approach, this course will explore bi/multicultural identities and communities in the Spanish-speaking world, primarily of the contemporary period: Mestizos, Korean-Argentineans, Afro-Peruvians, Latin American and Caribbean Chinatowns, Quechua-Castillian speakers, Spanglish-speakers from the United States to Gibraltar, Moroccans and West Africans in Spanish cities, “gallegos” in Buenos Aires, Filipino-Peruvian migrants in Tokyo and so on. Through a wide-variety of empirical, literary, and cultural texts (literature, film, music, graphic novel, photography, etc.), we will put diverse cases of ethnic and linguistic hybridity in dialogue with one another to study how communities and identities are represented, remembered, and demarcated; we will examine how they reclaim autonomy and space, and negotiate their personal and collective subjectivities amongst other communities and identities. Doing so will lead us to examine pressing socio-cultural phenomena that are increasingly global, rapidly-transforming, and interconnected: post/de/colonialism, bi/multiculturalism, transculturation, diaspora, immigration, exile, religion, borders, nationalism, nostalgia, capitalism, and structural in/exclusion. To help us study these issues and think of solutions, we will bring in theorists who have written on local and global hybridity (e.g., Bhabha, Spivek, Anzaldúa, Hall, Appiah). Inevitably, we will also discuss how these issues implicate us and our identities here in Amherst, MA in 2022. Students will have the opportunity to apply their knowledge as well as communicate personally with individuals who identify as bi/multicultural through a one-on-one interview project and invited speakers. Conducted in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 301 or permission of instructor. Spring Semester: Visiting Associate Professor Megan Saltzman.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Paul A. Schroeder Rodriguez

TTH 11:30 AM-12:50 PM

Amherst College
SPAN-461-01-2122S
pschroeder@amherst.edu
COLQ-461-01, SPAN-461-01

(Offered as COLQ 461 and SPAN 461) In this particular research tutorial we will ask how specific film practices help normalize racist vs. anti-racist structures of feeling. We will begin with a few key historical and theoretical texts on the long-term construction of racist and anti-racist structures of feeling in Latin America and in U.S. Latinx cultures, to then explore how these are reproduced or contested in a handful of films where racism and anti-racism are at the center of the filmic text, narratively and/or audiovisually. The selection of films will be made collaboratively, as will the subsequent research and the chosen end-product, for example an academic essay, a scholarly review essay, a digital resource for teachers, and/or media activism. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

This course is a research tutorial, listed in the catalog as colloquia for juniors and seniors, and is part of a tutorial series that engages Amherst students in substantive research with faculty in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. By exploring how different scholars approach a topic, students learn to frame a research question, develop research strategies, and identify and use sources. Students enrolled in these courses are guaranteed funding for at least six weeks of work during the summer following the academic year in which they take the course.

Open to sophomores and juniors. Limited to 6 students. Spring Semester. Professor Schroeder Rodriguez.

Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during all registration periods.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
116994
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116524,116994
A frame of mind typically refers to a mood or perspective. However, such dispositions also reflect a certain regulation of thought and thus behavior. In other words, something "frames" our minds in the first place. This course explores these ideas by interrogating the history of commonplace assumptions regarding issues such as freedom, race, prison, sexuality, government, and insanity. Authors include Giorgio Agamben, Wendy Brown, Michel Foucault, Friedrich Nietzsche, Edward Said, Ann Laura Stoler, and others.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116995
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116525,116995
This course will explore the history of Latina/o/x populations in New York City. Students will learn about histories of migration and settlement, urban inequality, community building, and urban transformation. The course will examine the many ways Latinas/os/x have transformed New York City and built vibrant communities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116997
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116526,116997,116724
What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116999
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116543,116999,116722,116572
This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

David Hernández

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
117139
dhernand@mtholyoke.edu
116527,117139
Critical Refugee Studies will address a unique and growing portion of the migration flow to the United States -- refugees and asylum seekers. The course will discuss the historical development of persons in flight from their home nations and the U.S.'s ability (and sometimes reluctance) to receive them. The course will address their legal and popular categorization, the various reasons for their displacement abroad, and overt and buried expressions of their identities based on their categorization and displacement.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Bianka Ballina

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM;W 07:15PM-10:05PM

Mount Holyoke College
116567
bballina@mtholyoke.edu
This course offers an overview of the history of sound cinema in Latin America, from its Golden Age to the contemporary period. We address key cinematic movements and aesthetic traditions, including Golden Age Mexican Cinema, Cinema Novo, Third Cinema, and New Latin American Cinema. The course also explores significant political, cultural, and economic changes that have altered the Latin American cinematic landscape in recent decades.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116572
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116543,116999,116722,116572
This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116460
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
116528,116545,116460,116948
This course addresses cultural relations between Latin America and Romance languages and cultures through the concept of vanguard: the Latin American poetic vanguardias of the early twentieth century and controversies with the Italian and Spanish vanguardias; the influence of the Négritude anti-colonial movement in Latin American decolonial thinking and the political avant-garde movements and guerrillas of the '60s and '70s; the intersections between French surrealism and Latin American magic realism; and the emergence of the Cinema Novo and New/Third Cinema (the vanguard of political cinema in Latin America) in the context of Italian neo-realism and the French nouvelle vague.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116724
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116526,116997,116724
What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116722
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116543,116999,116722,116572
This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116948
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
116528,116545,116460,116948
This course addresses cultural relations between Latin America and Romance languages and cultures through the concept of vanguard: the Latin American poetic vanguardias of the early twentieth century and controversies with the Italian and Spanish vanguardias; the influence of the Négritude anti-colonial movement in Latin American decolonial thinking and the political avant-garde movements and guerrillas of the '60s and '70s; the intersections between French surrealism and Latin American magic realism; and the emergence of the Cinema Novo and New/Third Cinema (the vanguard of political cinema in Latin America) in the context of Italian neo-realism and the French nouvelle vague.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
116524
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116524,116994
A frame of mind typically refers to a mood or perspective. However, such dispositions also reflect a certain regulation of thought and thus behavior. In other words, something "frames" our minds in the first place. This course explores these ideas by interrogating the history of commonplace assumptions regarding issues such as freedom, race, prison, sexuality, government, and insanity. Authors include Giorgio Agamben, Wendy Brown, Michel Foucault, Friedrich Nietzsche, Edward Said, Ann Laura Stoler, and others.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Instructor To Be Announced,David Hernández

MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
117125
dhernand@mtholyoke.edu
In Borderlands/La Frontera, Gloria Anzaldúa asserts that material change is impossible without changing the cultural imagery in our minds. Latinx Borderlands artists have effected such change through their cultural production. This course will introduce students to Borderlands literature and film, and will provide an overview of Mexican American, Chicanx, and other Latinx artistic production from the U.S- Mexico border region. The course will closely examine how these texts reflect borderland folklore, social issues, and "fronterizo" identities. Students will read multiple registers of artistic production, including fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, testimonio, and folk song lyrics.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116525
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116525,116995
This course will explore the history of Latina/o/x populations in New York City. Students will learn about histories of migration and settlement, urban inequality, community building, and urban transformation. The course will examine the many ways Latinas/os/x have transformed New York City and built vibrant communities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Vanessa Rosa

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116526
vrosa@mtholyoke.edu
116526,116997,116724
What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

David Hernández

M 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116527
dhernand@mtholyoke.edu
116527,117139
Critical Refugee Studies will address a unique and growing portion of the migration flow to the United States -- refugees and asylum seekers. The course will discuss the historical development of persons in flight from their home nations and the U.S.'s ability (and sometimes reluctance) to receive them. The course will address their legal and popular categorization, the various reasons for their displacement abroad, and overt and buried expressions of their identities based on their categorization and displacement.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Cora Fernandez Anderson

TTH 01:45PM-03:00PM

Mount Holyoke College
116854
canderso@mtholyoke.edu
The Americas have been characterized by the strictness of their laws in the criminalization of abortion. In some countries abortion is criminalized even when the woman's life is at risk. What role have women's movements played in advancing abortion rights? What has mattered most for a movement's success, its internal characteristics or external forces? Has the way the movement framed its demands mattered? How has the political influence of the Catholic and Evangelical churches influenced policies in this area? We will answer these questions by exploring examples from across the region through primary and secondary sources.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116528
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
116528,116545,116460,116948
This course addresses cultural relations between Latin America and Romance languages and cultures through the concept of vanguard: the Latin American poetic vanguardias of the early twentieth century and controversies with the Italian and Spanish vanguardias; the influence of the Négritude anti-colonial movement in Latin American decolonial thinking and the political avant-garde movements and guerrillas of the '60s and '70s; the intersections between French surrealism and Latin American magic realism; and the emergence of the Cinema Novo and New/Third Cinema (the vanguard of political cinema in Latin America) in the context of Italian neo-realism and the French nouvelle vague.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

TTH 10:00AM-11:15AM

Mount Holyoke College
116541
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
This transdisciplinary course is an introduction to Latin America through its cultural production (literature, film, music, painting, dancing, comics, performance, among others). We are going to address some of the most important moments of the continents' history: independence period, modernization, nationalism, Mexican Revolution, Latin America and the Cold War, Cuban Revolution, Literary Boom in Latin America, Southern Cone cultural production during dicatorships, politics of memory, popular media and mass culture. These cultural products and historical moments will also be interacting with some of the most relevant concepts of gender theory, cultural studies, critical race theory and human rights.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Antonio Illescas

MW 03:15PM-04:30PM

Mount Holyoke College
116542
illescas@mtholyoke.edu
The main objectives of this course are to consolidate the knowledge of the language, as well as to help both non-native and native speakers understand and explain how Spanish works as a linguistic system for communication. Topics covered in this course will range from a review of general goals and methods in Linguistics, to phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics, and language variation within the Spanish speaking world. The coursework will highlight those grammatical aspects that are typically problematic for learners of Spanish as a second language.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Justin Crumbaugh

TTH 11:30AM-12:45PM

Mount Holyoke College
116543
jcrumbau@mtholyoke.edu
116543,116999,116722,116572
This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Adriana Pitetta

T 01:30PM-04:20PM

Mount Holyoke College
116545
apitetta@mtholyoke.edu
116528,116545,116460,116948
This course addresses cultural relations between Latin America and Romance languages and cultures through the concept of vanguard: the Latin American poetic vanguardias of the early twentieth century and controversies with the Italian and Spanish vanguardias; the influence of the Négritude anti-colonial movement in Latin American decolonial thinking and the political avant-garde movements and guerrillas of the '60s and '70s; the intersections between French surrealism and Latin American magic realism; and the emergence of the Cinema Novo and New/Third Cinema (the vanguard of political cinema in Latin America) in the context of Italian neo-realism and the French nouvelle vague.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Dana Leibsohn

TU 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
ARH-280cv-01-202203

Hillyer 103

dleibsoh@smith.edu
How does conquest by foreigners change the ways that images, civic spaces and objects are created and used? What kinds of hybrids does colonization produce? Is it possible to describe what is “colonial” about art or architecture? Focusing on recent scholarship, this seminar addresses these queries, highlighting the 16th–19th centuries. Among the topics we consider are interpretive work in the field of “colonial studies,” the mapping and construction of colonial spaces, exchanges that brought people and objects into contact (and conflict) with one another, how colonialism can shape the meaning of objects, and the nationalist histories of colonial projects. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Lester Tomé

M 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Smith College
DAN-377sa-01-202203

Theatre 207A

ltome@smith.edu
This course is an in-depth exploration of salsa from theoretical and practical perspectives. Dance lessons familiarize the students with beginner to intermediate level salsa steps, targeting skills in bodily coordination, musicality, expressivity and improvisation, as well as in memorization of choreography and communication between partners. The learning of the dance is framed within and analysis of literature on salsa cutting across dance history, anthropology, musicology and cultural studies. Readings, documentaries, class discussions and research assignments situate salsa as an expression of Latino and Latin American cultures, but also as a global product through which dancers and musicians from Cuba to Japan perform notions of gender, ethnicity and nationality. No previous dance experience required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Dana Leibsohn

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
LAS-291-01-202203
dleibsoh@smith.edu
What does it mean to de-colonize a museum? How does such work happen, and who actually does the "decolonizing?" With these questions as guide, this class considers Latin American museums--of art, natural history, local and other histories--through comparative lenses. Decolonizing conversations are taking place in many parts of the world, and so this course addresses Latin American and Latinx projects in relation to those taking place in Africa and the Pacific Islands, in western Europe and North America. Independent research projects will figure prominently; recommended: at least one class in Latin American and Latino/a Studies, art history, anthropology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michelle Joffroy

TU 1:20 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
LAS-301ae-01-202203
mjoffroy@smith.edu
What do artists have to say to activists and scientists? Students in this seminar will immerse in case studies drawn from Latin American and Latinx geographies (1970s to the present) to explore the promises and pitfalls of cultural experiments across boundaries of knowledge-making in art, ecology and activism. We will work with a range of public culture technologies--including digital storytelling, social and print media--to illuminate these “activist ecologies” for diverse publics outside academia. Open to juniors and seniors of any major. Some background in the study of the Latinx/Latin America(s) required. Enrollment limited to 12. Juniors and Seniors only. Instructor permission required.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Marguerite I. Harrison

M W F 9:25 AM - 10:15 AM

Smith College
POR-111-01-202203
mharriso@smith.edu
A continuation of POR110. Development of conversational communication, listening comprehension, reading skills and cultural knowledge through music. Prerequisite: POR 110 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malcolm Kenneth McNee

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
POR-125-01-202203

Hatfield 206

mmcnee@smith.edu
A one-semester introduction to Brazilian Portuguese designed for speakers of Spanish, aimed at basic proficiency in all four language modalities: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Classes are in Portuguese and students’ individual knowledge of Spanish supports the accelerated pace of the course, with contrastive approaches to pronunciation and grammar. The course also provides an introduction to aspects of the cultures of Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese-speaking Africa, with discussion of authentic audio-visual materials and short texts. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisite: Spanish placement test or SPN 220 or its equivalent.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malcolm Kenneth McNee

M W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
POR-212-01-202203

Hatfield 206

mmcnee@smith.edu
POR 212-01, WLT 212-01
Introducing translated works by celebrated Portuguese-language writers, this course will explore
themes of resistance, including resistance to dictatorship, patriarchy, slavery, racism, and colonialism, but also more ambivalent postures of resistance toward authority assumed within particular forms of
expertise and knowledge production and deployment. Discussing fiction by Machado de Assis and
Clarice Lispector (Brazil), Mia Couto and Paulina Chiziane (Mozambique), Grada Kilomba
(Portugal/Germany), and Nobel laureate José Saramago (Portugal), we will consider historical contexts,
how their work resonates with our contemporary world, literature and fictionality as sites of resistance,
and the sometimes fraught dynamics they reveal between authorship and authority.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Simone M. Gugliotta

M W F 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
POR-215-01-202203
sgugliot@smith.edu
This course focuses on developing skills in both spoken and written Portuguese and is designed for students who have already learned the fundamentals of grammar. Topics for compositions, class discussions and oral reports are based on short literary texts as well as journalistic articles, music and film. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: POR 100Y, POR 110, POR 125 or POR 200, or permission of the instructor.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Marguerite I. Harrison

M W 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
POR-381fw-01-202203
mharriso@smith.edu
This course makes reference to the pioneering legacy of key figures in Brazilian filmmaking, such as Susana Amaral, Helena Solberg and Tizuka Yamasaki. These directors’ early works addressed issues of gender and social class biases by subtly shifting the focus of their films to marginalized or peripheral subjects. We also examine the work of contemporary filmmakers, among them Lúcia Murat, Tata Amaral, Laís Bodanzky and Anna Muylaert, focusing on the ways in which they incorporate sociopolitical topics and/or gender issues. Course conducted in Portuguese. Prerequisite: 200-level course in Portuguese, or the equivalent. Juniors and seniors only. Enrollment limited to 12.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Silvia Berger

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
SPN-220-01-202203
sberger2@smith.edu
This is a high-intermediate course that aims at increasing students’ ability to communicate comfortably in Spanish (orally and in writing). The course explores an array of issues relevant to the Spanish-speaking world, and prepares students to think more critically and in depth about those issues, with the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of the target cultures. Materials used in the class include visual narratives (film), short stories, poems, plays and essays. Prerequisite: SPN 200 or Spanish Placement Exam (https://www.smith.edu/aboutsmith/ registrar/placement-exams). Enrollment limited to 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Silvia Berger

TU TH 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
SPN-220-02-202203
sberger2@smith.edu
This is a high-intermediate course that aims at increasing students’ ability to communicate comfortably in Spanish (orally and in writing). The course explores an array of issues relevant to the Spanish-speaking world, and prepares students to think more critically and in depth about those issues, with the goal of achieving a deeper understanding of the target cultures. Materials used in the class include visual narratives (film), short stories, poems, plays and essays. Prerequisite: SPN 200 or Spanish Placement Exam (https://www.smith.edu/aboutsmith/ registrar/placement-exams). Enrollment limited to 25.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Silvia Berger

TU TH 4:10 PM - 5:25 PM

Smith College
SPN-246jl-01-202203
sberger2@smith.edu
This course will examine representations of the Jewish-Latin American experience through the study of 20th- and 21st-century texts and films. It will explore how recent authors and filmmakers present issues concerning this minority group's identity and belonging. Special attention will be given to images of Jews and Jewish history as expressions of current social and political concerns. Texts will be in Spanish and in Spanish translations from Portuguese. Movies, in both languages, will be shown with subtitles. Fulfills the writing requirement for the major. Prerequisites: SPN 220 or above. Enrollment limited to 20.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Michelle Joffroy

TU TH 10:50 AM - 12:05 PM

Smith College
SPN-260dl-01-202203
mjoffroy@smith.edu
This course offers critical perspectives on colonialism, literatures of conquest and narratives of cultural resistance in the Americas and the Caribbean. Decolonial theories of violence, writing and representation in the colonial context inform the study of literary and cultural production of this period. Readings explore several themes including indigenous knowledge, land and the natural world; orality, literacy and visual cultures; race, rebellion and liberation; slavery, piracy and power, and the coloniality of gender.  Prerequisite:  SPN 220 or equivalent.  Enrollment limited to 19.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Malcolm Kenneth McNee

M W 2:45 PM - 4:00 PM

Smith College
WLT-212-01-202203

Hatfield 206

mmcnee@smith.edu
POR 212-01, WLT 212-01
Introducing translated works by celebrated Portuguese-language writers, this course will explore
themes of resistance, including resistance to dictatorship, patriarchy, slavery, racism, and colonialism, but also more ambivalent postures of resistance toward authority assumed within particular forms of
expertise and knowledge production and deployment. Discussing fiction by Machado de Assis and
Clarice Lispector (Brazil), Mia Couto and Paulina Chiziane (Mozambique), Grada Kilomba
(Portugal/Germany), and Nobel laureate José Saramago (Portugal), we will consider historical contexts,
how their work resonates with our contemporary world, literature and fictionality as sites of resistance,
and the sometimes fraught dynamics they reveal between authorship and authority.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kimberlee Perez

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
27506

Integ. Learning Center N255

kimperez@umass.edu
This course looks at the ways race, racial identities, and interracial relations are formed through and by communication practices in present-day U.S. America. Though focusing on U.S. America in the current historical moment, the course takes into account the ways history as well as the transnational flows of people and capital inform and define conversations about race and racial identities. Race will be discussed as intersectional, taking into account the ways race is understood and performed in relation to gender, sexuality, class, and nation. The course will focus on the performance and communications of race, ranging from everyday interactions, personal narratives and storytelling, intra- and inter-racial dialogue, and staged performances.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Young

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
30380

Herter Hall room 225

kayoung@umass.edu
This course traces the history of Mexican society, politics, and culture from the late 18th century to the present. The first half analyzes the turbulent formation of Mexico, the legacies of Spanish colonialism, peasant uprisings of the 19th century, and the origins and course of the famous Revolution of 1910. The second half focuses on the century since the revolution, including the consolidation of a conservative one-party state, the so-called "Mexican miracle" of the mid-20th century, the adoption of neoliberal economic policies starting in the 1980s, and the ongoing political struggles of workers, peasants, women, students, and indigenous people. Equipped with this historical grounding, we will then try to make sense of the crises of neoliberalism, drug-related violence, and declining state legitimacy in the early part of this century. Previous Latin American history survey desirable.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Kevin Young

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
30378

Herter Hall room 225

kayoung@umass.edu
This class explores the long and contentious relationships between the United States and the Latin American nations. It focuses on the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, analyzing the Spanish-American war, upheaval in Central America in the 1920s, the place of Cuba within the growing informal U.S. empire, trade relations with the South American nations, the impact of the Cold War on the hemisphere, the role of the CIA in destabilizing and overthrowing popularly elected government, and the U.S. as both a supporter and opponent of Human Rights and democracy under various late twentieth-century presidents. We analyze these events through the lenses of political, economic, social, and cultural history.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Sonia Alvarez

TU TH 4:00PM 5:15PM

UMass Amherst
34029

Machmer Hall room W-27

soniaa@polsci.umass.edu
Overview of major approaches to the study of Latin American politics and survey of historical and contemporary democratic, populist, authoritarian, and revolutionary regimes. Special attention to local, national and global forces shaping development strategies and public policies; changing institutional arrangements and shifting discourses of domination; and, social movements and strategies of resistance among subaltern social groups and classes.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Sonia Alvarez

W 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
34103

Machmer Hall room E-10

soniaa@polsci.umass.edu
This course examines contemporary forms of political activism, participation, and protest. Drawing on select case studies, principally from Latin America, the U.S, and Europe, we will pay particular attention to the dynamic development of feminisms, anti-racist/Black mobilizations, anti-austerity and pro-democracy protests, and LGBTQ organizing.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Millicent Thayer

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
35335

Machmer Hall room E-33

thayer@soc.umass.edu
This class will serve as a gateway into the discipline of sociology. It examines Latin America using a sociological lens and helps students to grasp some of the basic concepts that sociologists use to understand the social world. At the same time, it takes an interdisciplinary approach drawing on history, anthropology, political science, development and education, as well as sociology.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Margara Russotto

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
35528
margheri@spanport.umass.edu
Discussion, guided conversation in Spanish on specific topics. Emphasis on further development of listening and speaking skills.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
3.00

Carole Cloutier

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
35536

Herter Hall room 209

cloutier@spanport.umass.edu
Discussion, guided conversation in Spanish on specific topics. Emphasis on further development of listening and speaking skills.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Stephanie Fetta

M W F 10:10AM 11:00AM

UMass Amherst
38362

Herter Hall room 211

sfetta@umass.edu
This is a course for students of Spanish heritage who speak Spanish but have not studied it formally. Students will formalize their Spanish skills through classroom conversation, reading texts based on contemporary topics, and argumentative writing. Grammar will be interwoven throughout these activities.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Emma Rivera-Rabago

TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM

UMass Amherst
35511
rivera@spanport.umass.edu
Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the beginnings to the end of the Romantic period. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: SPANISH 311 or consent of instructor. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

02
4.00

Emma Rivera-Rabago

TU TH 11:30AM 12:45PM

UMass Amherst
35555
rivera@spanport.umass.edu
Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the beginnings to the end of the Romantic period. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: SPANISH 311 or consent of instructor. (Gen.Ed. HS, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Emma Rivera-Rabago

M W F 11:15AM 12:05PM

UMass Amherst
35497

Herter Hall room 117

rivera@spanport.umass.edu
Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the end of the Romantic period to the present. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: SPANISH 311 or consent of instructor. (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Stephanie Fetta

TU TH 1:00PM 2:15PM

UMass Amherst
35521

Herter Hall room 118

sfetta@umass.edu
In this course students will think critically about the various "wild tongues" that have defined U.S. Latinx literature and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. Our analysis will center on issues of power as they are experienced by diverse U.S. Latinx populations. Specifically, we will focus on Latinx writers, performers, and scholars that push the boundaries of acceptable gender, sexuality, and racialization within U.S. Latinx cultures, focusing specifically on Caribbean and Chicanx populations in the United States. Students will be required to engage critically with primary texts, as well as reflect on the ways in which these issues exist in the world around us. Because Latinx thinkers often blur the boundaries of traditional literary and scholarly genres, we will consider pinnacle works of Latinx studies - such as those of Pedro Pietri, Gloria Anzaldua, and Junot Diaz - alongside other forms of cultural production, such as performance art and film. We will also try our hands at these art forms in an effort to find new, embodied ways to interact with expressions of Latinx culture. Course texts are written in both English and Spanish. Class discussion will take place in Spanish. All assignments must be completed in Spanish. (Gen. Ed. AL, DU)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
4.00

Patricia Gubitosi

TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM

UMass Amherst
36583
gubitosi@hfa.umass.edu
This course offers a critical view of regional and social varieties of Spanish language spoken in Spain and Latin America, with specific emphasis on situations of language contact and multilingualism affecting Spanish in those areas. We will pay close attention to varieties that are not considered standard or prestigious among Spanish speakers, and how this consideration affects people's lives and self-esteem. (Gen. Ed. SB, DG)
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

01
3.00

Margara Russotto

TU 4:00PM 6:30PM

UMass Amherst
36587

Herter Hall room 400

margheri@spanport.umass.edu
Curso/Taller/Laboratorio de escritura creativa en espanol. Dirigido a estudiantes con dominio del idioma, pasion literaria, e interes en desarrollar su propia escritura y capacidades creativas. Es un lugar de encuentro donde se practica la constante ejercitacion con las palabras mediante la escritura y la reescritura, entendiendo la creacion como un camino de conocimiento estetico y a la vez de autoconocimiento y autodeterminacion.
Instructor Permission: Permission is required for interchange registration during the add/drop period only.

Resources

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies (LACLS) has a long and distinguished history in the Five Colleges (the University of Massachusetts–Amherst, and Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges). For over three decades, the main goal of FCLACLS has been to promote the multi- and inter-disciplinary study of Latin America.

With respect to the individual programs, the University of Massachusetts–Amherst Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies offers an undergraduate certificate, a graduate certificate and a minor. The Mount Holyoke College and Smith College Latin American Studies Programs offer a major and minor. At Hampshire College, students may develop an area of specialization in Latin American Studies in conjunction with or in addition to their area of concentration. At Amherst College, students may design a major in Latin American Studies.

FCLACLS Certificate

The FCLACLS Council administers the Five College Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies Certificate. The requirements include the successful (a grade of B or higher) completion of eight one-semester courses selected from five different areas. The five areas are a broadly based introductory course on the social and political history of Latin America, a social science course, a humanities course, four advanced elective courses and an interdisciplinary senior seminar. Language training is crucial. Certificates are awarded only after having demonstrated proficiency through at least the advanced intermediate level in Spanish, Portuguese or an indigenous language of the Americas. Students are encouraged to take advantage of cross-enrollment opportunities at the other colleges.

UMass Undergraduate Certificate

The undergraduate certificate and minor at UMass allow students to develop a concentration in LACLS as a complement to their disciplinary major. The certificate program offers two options, one emphasizing competence (at the advanced intermediate level) in both Spanish and Portuguese, the other, one language and a greater number (six rather than four) of area studies courses. The area studies courses must be from at least three different disciplines. Both tracks require an advanced interdisciplinary seminar. The minor requires six area studies courses. Students may major in LAS through the Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration program.

Latin American Studies Minor and Certificate at UMass

Mount Holyoke College Major and Minor Programs

The LAS major at MHC requires a minimum of 10 courses of which at least half must be at the advanced level; the minor requires a minimum of five. Among the required courses is an introductory course in either Latin American cultures or economies, one advanced literature course and a course focusing on less studied Latin American social groups. The program requires a command of Spanish or Portuguese at the advanced intermediate level and recommends at least an elementary knowledge of the other language. At Smith, the LAS major is anchored by a core set of four required courses in literature and history that provide the foundation for in-depth interdisciplinary study. Students must complete an additional six courses at the intermediate or advanced level, with two of these in the social sciences and at least one in the arts. A proficiency in Spanish at the advanced intermediate level is required and reading knowledge of Portuguese is recommended. The LAS Minor requires six courses. At Amherst College students develop their own major in LAS by writing a senior honor’s thesis in consultation with three advisors. At Hampshire, which does not have majors and minors, students develop a concentration in Latin America by writing their required senior honor’s thesis on a relevant topic and through an appropriate selection of inter-disciplinary courses.

Latin American Studies at Mount Holyoke

The Graduate Program at UMass

The graduate certificate at UMass is intended to structure graduate study with a LAS focus, foster interdisciplinary scholarship and promote foreign language competence. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in a regular disciplinary or professional master’s or Ph.D. program. Candidates must complete a minimum of four graduate area study courses in three disciplines, demonstrate language proficiency at the advanced intermediate level, complete a thesis or dissertation on a Latin American theme and present their research results in the CLACLS Research Workshop.

Graduate Certificate in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies at UMass

Five College Libraries

The total size of the Five College Latin American collection is in excess of 225,000 volumes, placing it among the 20 largest LAS collections nationwide, a true gem for undergraduates. The Pauline P. Collins Collection at UMass numbers 200,000+ volumes, over half of these in Spanish and Portuguese. The four colleges have not enumerated their Latin American acquisitions, but an analysis of their Latin American holdings (by LC call numbers) in Latin American history and literature yields a total of 25,812 volumes.

Five College Library Catalog

The Lorna M. Peterson Prize

The Lorna M. Peterson Prize supports scholarly and creative work by undergraduate students taking part in Five College programs. The $500 prize is awarded annually based on nominations from Five College programs.

Contact Us

Council Chair:

Javier Puente, Assistant Professor of Latin American and Latino/a Studies, Smith College

Five College Staff Liaison:

Rebecca Thomas, Academic Programs Coordinator

Connect:

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